Thursday, September 25, 2014

ATTRIBUTES OF CHARACTERIZATION


Characterization is key to any novel, whether that novel be character-driven or plot-driven.




We all know to make our characters interesting, sympathetic, memorable.  We know to draw them with verve and vitality. We know to give a physical description. We know not to make them perfect (perfect is boring and allows no room for growth). 

But do we delve deeper into other attributes?
           
Moral compass.  What is your protagonist’s moral compass?  How does he react to a situation where he has a choice between right and wrong?
  
Image provided by Classroom Clipart

If he is honest to a fault, why is he that way?  If his honesty vacillates, why is he that way?  If, upon finding a wallet, does he look for identification to return it or does he rifle through it to take whatever money is in it?  If he chooses the latter, does he later feel remorse?  Or does he feel justified in taking the money, believing that if someone were foolish enough to lose his wallet, he deserves to lose his money as well?  

What is your character’s attitude about racism?  Will he stand up for the underdog or is he more likely to go along with the crowd when it comes to making fun of someone who is different?

Family background.  What is your character’s family background?  What is her place in the family?  Books have been written upon birth order in influencing one’s behavior.  The oldest child is frequently a leader, success oriented, determined to forge his own path in life.  The middle child is often a peace-maker, the baby of the family somewhat spoiled, even a show-off.  With five children in our family, I can clearly see the effects of birth order.   

Image provided by Classroom Clipart

Of course, these are generalizations.  Use them as a jumping-off point. Aside from birth order, there is the familial role. Have you noticed that returning to your parents’ home can trigger a reversion to the role you played as a child? My sister and I laugh (and sometimes cry) over the fact that we assumed the roles we had as children when we visited our parents.  Twenty, thirty years later, we still return to the roles we played, or those that were foist upon us, when we return home.

Social background.  Who are your main character’s friends?  With whom does she feel comfortable hanging out?  Conversely, with whom does she feel uncomfortable?  

Consider the example of a fifteen year old girl who has gone to live with her grandparents after her parents’ untimely death in a car accident.  She is plunged into a new town, a new school, a new life.  At school, does she choose to hang out with the nerds because those were her friends in her previous life?  Or does she go the other direction and find friends with the kids who cut class, experiment with drugs, shop-lift?  Does grief prompt her to choose such a vastly different social group?  Or does her grief send her into a shell where she refuses to involve herself with anyone, even her grandparents who love her?   

Image provided by Classroom Clipart


Another part of social background is that of socio-economic status.  Does your character come from a well-to-do home with all the advantages?  Or does she come from a home where the parents are barely scraping by to make a living? Are books abundant in her life or are they a scarcity?   Do you see how this connects with the attribute of family background?

Cultural influences.  Everyone has cultural influences, whatever they ethnicity.  I grew up in Washington, DC, but I count the south as part of my culture because my mother came from Tennessee and brought many of those customs with her.  The language, the cooking, the attitudes of the south colored our family and continue to pop up every now and then and make themselves felt in my writing. 

Image provided by Classroom Clipart

What are the cultural influences on your character?  Did he grow up in a family that emigrated from Germany as did my brother-in-law?  Do his father’s parents, who hail from Russia, live with his family?  These factors can have a profound effect upon a child and his thinking, from the way dinner is served to how holidays are celebrated.  

 Characters do not develop in a vacuum. Are you beginning to see how all of these attributes—and others—are connected?  A character’s moral compass is directly related to her family background. Cultural influences make themselves known in the social backdrop of her life.
*  *  *

Join Jane in celebrating her sale to Love Inspired Suspense!
  Keeping Watch is an October 2014 release,
 and someone in Seekerville will become the proud owner of a copy by just leaving a comment. Check back on Saturday and see if it's YOU!

Jane McBride Choate has been making up stories for as long as she can remember.  When she was in grade school, her friends asked her to tell them stories about themselves.  She complied gladly and told outlandish tales, complete with damsels in distress and the heroic princes who saved them. Now her stories are likely to include a kick-butt woman saving a prince ... and saving the day as well. Writing--and getting paid to do  it--is a dream come true.



Deputy D.A. Danielle Barclay has been threatened, but she is not impressed when her dad hires former Delta Force soldier Jake Rabb as her bodyguard. The stalker's threats continue, and it becomes apparent that there is a personal connection. Danielle is determined to survive and cannot imagine who hates her this much. Could it be related to her mother's disappearance four years ago? Just when they think they may have things figured out, they realize they may be wrong. Will it be too late? Choate makes a convincing Love Inspired Suspense debut. The strong-willed, independent heroine demonstrates that prayer is the ultimate protection.








84 comments:

Marianne Barkman said...

Welcome to Seekerville, Jane! Such a great post, and lovely giveaway. I hope I win it! Thanks

Lyndee H said...

Hi Jane!
I really needed this post right now! I'm very close to wrapping up a first draft WIP and as I read your post, I applied the info to my characters. I've already found areas I can improve in the second draft. YAY! Very helpful. Thanks!

Kav said...

Great spin on digging deeper into character. Just curious -- do you consciously think it all through before you even start writing? Or does it evolve as you go?

And guess what I finished last night? Keep Watch. I couldn't go to sleep until I finished. Awesome read. So don't enter me in the draw.

Cindy W. said...

I love books that are character driven. I also love it when the characters are flawed as it makes them more real to me. When I finish a book that the characters have pulled me into and held me there throughout the entire book I know that they will stay with me for awhile and I love that.

Thank you for the great post and I would love to win a copy of your book. I love the LI Suspense line.

Smiles & Blessings,
Cindy W.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Jane, well done! You've summed up in super readable form how to examine characters from multiple directions and then keep them in character. I love this!

Huge thank yous for being here today, you know the BOSSY ONES are all away, wining and dining in St. Louis, right???

And we've issued some FUN WRITER CHALLENGES here in Seekerville, to spur us stay-at-homes to working harder, faster, longer over the week to develop better writing habits! That's our goal!

So if some of your commenters talk about their word count... or their hunger for CHOCOLATE!!!! there's a box of chocolate going to ONE HARD-WORKING villager this week, courtesy of the Prize Vault because rewards for stay-at-homes ROCK!!!!

Helen set up the coffee pots to brew...


COFFEE IS HERE!!!!

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I'm tossing my .02 in for Kav's question....

I have an idea in the beginning, but I develop it deeper as I go, Kav. It usually takes me a few chapters before I really feel that I've got the character's internal and externals set, and that's mostly just asking myself "why?" If I want her to over-react to that situation, what's making her do it and then I put a note at the end of the manuscript to tie her reaction into something later in the book. So it can either be a current event or a memory... those reminders at the end of the manuscript are my cheat sheets to help me stay focused on the story goal.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Good morning, Jane and welcome back to Seekerville!

I absolutely love the premise for your book. Wonderful. Congratulations on your debut.

Of course not your debut, debut. You are a veteran!

I brought banana bread muffins. Truly yummy!

Tina Radcliffe said...

What are you working on next???

Rose said...

Good Morning, Jane.

You gave us many questions to consider when creating our characters.

I always ask myself these questions while I'm working on my synopsis. Occasionally they change during the development of the story.

Cara Lynn James said...

Welcome to Seekerville, Jane! Thank you for the fabulous post. It's a keeper and I just saved it for future reference.

You've added so many important questions to the list I use when making my characters' background. Background adds so much richness to the story.

kaybee said...

Thank you Jane.
I often think I have this "nailed," but then a critique partner or other reader will point a laser beam at an aspect of the character I hadn't realized. Also, when I layer in on multiple drafts, things come out about the character and go in to the WIP.
I think people in our century demand a little more from their characters, even in plot-driven books. Which is fine with me.
KB

Missy Tippens said...

Jane, welcome! And congrats on your sale to LIS!! Your book sounds fantastic.

Thanks for the great reminders of all the areas we can use while drawing our characters. I'm with Lyndee. This will be a great list to use while doing the second draft.

Missy Tippens said...

You know, flaws are interesting to me. Sure, we don't like perfect characters. But how much of a flaw will we, as readers, tolerate??

Maybe it depends on how well we motivate them.

Missy Tippens said...

Ruthy, I love your idea of a cheat sheet. Because I've found that in every book something just pops up as I'm writing--something I haven't planned. And then I have to figure out how to go back and work it in.

I usually make a little note and then highlight in yellow. But that list is a great idea! You can print it out and then check things off as you add.

Jane said...

Good morning, ladies. I apologize for being so late in signing on. My computer was giving me fits this morning. Thank you for being so welcoming. I'm glad you think this post is useful.

Jane said...

Good morning, ladies. I apologize for being so late in signing on. My computer was giving me fits this morning. Thank you for being so welcoming. I'm glad you think this post is useful.

Jane said...

Kav, Thank you for your kind words about Keeping Watch. It was a book of the heart but wouldn't have made it to publication without the help of a dear friend. It occurred to me that that is what Seekerville is all about, friendship and help. I think the Lord must be smiling upon you because that is what He wants from all of us--to help each other.

Jane said...

Kav, Thank you for your kind words about Keeping Watch. It was a book of the heart but wouldn't have made it to publication without the help of a dear friend. It occurred to me that that is what Seekerville is all about, friendship and help. I think the Lord must be smiling upon you because that is what He wants from all of us--to help each other.

Jane said...

I don't know why my comments are showing up twice. My husband always says (when I'm having computer problems)"It's most likely an operator problem." (Operator being me!)

Audra Harders said...

Good morning, everyone. I have been soooo MIA lately, I apologize all the way down to my toes.

Welcome back, Jane! I'm so excited whenever I can persuade Jane to join us in Seekerville. She is such a veteran in the romance novel world.

Congrats on your sale to LIS! I can't wait to hold it in my hot little hands and look forward to reading many more from you!!

Jane said...

Kav, I had to think through your question about whether or not I consciously think through my characters' attributes before I start writing. I wish I could say I always do. Frequently, though, those things evolve as I'm writing and my characters start talking to me.

I'm currently working on a sequel to Keeping Watch: Keeping Silent. It features the hero's (of Keeping Watch) sister, Shelley. Shelley has her own issues, including a botched Secret Service mission that led her to leave the Service and start her own security/protection agency. Please pray that I can do this right. I don't want to be a "one book wonder."

Audra Harders said...

KAV, to chime in your questions, my entire process per book is an evolve as you go. I've learned how to corral my thoughts into an outline --hallelujah-- but details and tidbits pop in out of nowhere.

Maybe someday I'll learn how to think it all through ahead of time, but I'm not holding my breath for that moment.

Audra Harders said...

Ruthy is giving away chocolate...

Missy Tippens said...

LOL, Jane! I'm laughing about the operator problem. :)

Audra Harders said...

The whole idea of cheat sheet reminders is so easy to incorporate since I've started using Scrivener. My mind wanders through a book --much like it does through life-- and keeping little notes in the side bar of each scene helps me go back and think if adding this new story vein was a good idea or not.

Did I follow through?
Did it move my story forward?
Did I drop the ball, and should I pick it up?

If the answer is no, I apply a tourniquet to the off-shoot idea and pull it out of the story.

Missy Tippens said...

Audra, I use Scrivener to plan scenes (the cork board). But I haven't tried it for the actual writing (I do that in Word). But that really is a great feature! Maybe I should try it on a proposal just to see how I like writing inside the program.

Jane said...

I've heard great things about Scrivener. For a chronically confused writer like me, it could be a real boon.

While I'm thinking of it, I wanted to invite you to drop in at my blogs: www.janemcbride.blogspot.com and www.janemchoate.blogspot.com.

The first is almost four years old, a daily blog called The Gratitude Project. The second is brand new and features letters to readers. Many thanks to a dear friend, Leslie Sartor, who set it up for me. (That writer helping writer thing again.)

April Gardner said...

Perfect timing for this characterization refresher! Thanks. And I adore a bodyguard hero. ;-)

Jane said...

April, I'm glad you found this helpful. Don't we all adore a bodyguard hero? My next book will have a bodyguard heroine? Isn't it wonderful how our thinking and expectations have evolved over the decades and are reflected in books? Gone are the days when the heroine could only be a nurse, teacher, or nanny. (I'm dating myself here!)

Myra Johnson said...

Jane, so glad you could join us in Seekerville today! I love your suggestions about how to dig deeper into our characters' personalities and backgrounds. We're all shaped by our pasts in some way.

I'm another of those writers who figure it out as I write, though. I have some general ideas about my characters as I begin, but as I "watch" them live out their own stories, I learn so much more! Sometimes it means I have to backtrack a little to layer in some details or foreshadowing, but the joy of discovery is so worth the effort!

Jennifer Smith said...

Thanks for this article, Jane! Better characterization is one of the things I've been focusing on in my writing lately.

Jane said...

Myra, I love your phrase "the joy of discovery." Isn't that what writing is all about? Discovering. We discover things about our charcters. We also discover things about ourselves.

Jane said...

Jennifer, I think we are all (or at least most of us) are looking to deepen our characterization. My dear friend Amanda Cabot has taught me much about this, to look beyond the obvious and delve into why a character behaves as he/she does.

Sandy Smith said...

Thank you for your post, Jane. I am getting started on my novel and working on my characterizations, so this is timely. Your book looks good!

Audra Harders said...

Missy, Jane, I love using Scrivener as my writing program. So many to-die-for features. Of course, it's been around a while now, it's just lately they created a version for PCs. I only use Word for the grammar check now.

I'll have to invite Gwen Hernandez back again to talk Scrivener.

Audra Harders said...

Jane, your post brings up details on characterization on so many levels. Like Amanda Cabot points out, WHY a character does what s/he does is such an important point to drive home. You've mentioned a lot of important points to consider.

I always need checks like this!

Myra Johnson said...

I love Scrivener! I'm sure there are lots of features I have yet to use as effectively as I could, but it sure makes it easier to track all the various aspects of my story. It's great to be able to save actual web pages right into my research tab, and to add photos to my character files.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Jane and welcome to Seekerville. What a great post and since i'm doing final edits on a novella, they are good points to consider. smile

Thanks again and have a fun day.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Ruthy, cough cough, did I hear you say ALL the bossy ones were in St Louis???? My, my, my, I thought you stayed at home this year.

Wilani Wahl said...

Jane, thank you for this post. I am looking forward to reading your book.

Rebecca said...

Thank you, Jane, for some great ideas on character. I have read of authors who do a very detailed interview with their main characters to help carve out the different aspects of their characters.
Congratulations on you new release!

Leslie Ann aka LA said...

Dear Jane,
I loved the post!! You brought up points that shamefully, hadn't occurred to me, but will now. I tend to find more connections to the past in my rewrites.

Thank you for the kudos, on the blog, it's a great blog and I'm excited that you're adding your writing articles as well.

As an author of what 33 books? You're not a newbie at this, but still LIS is a great feather in your cap and I'm so PLEASED Shelly's book is next.
Can't wait.

Hugs to one who always watches out for the other guy/writer/friend, you.

Leslie Ann Sartor aka LA Sartor

Audra Harders said...

Myra, doesn't that joy of discovery sometimes mess up our best laid plans for our characters? LOL. I do believe though that following the joy greatly reduces the hazards of episodic writing.

Leslie Ann aka LA said...

Audra and Missy,
Audra got me involved with Scrivener and I use it as first/second draft.
Then go to Word b/c my editor uses it.

I love the corkboard and really love their newest product called Scapple for plotting etc.

Can't wait until their App comes come and I can write on my iPad.

Thanks for the coffee, Ruth and the muffins, Tina.

Hugs
LA

Jane said...

Do you ever wonder why you chose writing? Or did it choose you? Sometimes I ponder that. It's sort of a chicken/egg thing. Which came first? I think story-telling is a desire most people have, but to make it come true takes a special kind of perseverance and perhaps a bit of obsession. It's so nice to connect with all of you who share that.

Vince said...

Hi Jane:

I love what you wrote about the military on your website. Is there a military suspense romance in your future? Debby Giusti should not have to carry the full burden for LI. : )

I have a project in Scrivener where I put the best posts. Yours is now safely saved under “Writing Resources Project”.

Your post made me think of a potential very useful Seeker post that perhaps Tina could assign to one of the plotters.

Assignment: Combine all your points as questions with the points mentioned in other Seeker posts and then craft a set of interview questions from all of them. With all these questions, an author could ‘interview’ each major character at the start of the story and have that interview on file for instant recall.

Pantsers could ‘conduct’ their interviews in an ad hoc way as the story progresses. These interview questions could cover what is usually found in traditional character bios so there would only be one combined source of character data to maintain.

Now for my main question: What happened to the poor lady on your cover art? I like the same statue on your website but the one on the cover art has a broken sword and something, I know not what, covering her face. It seems very odd. Is there some hidden message in that artwork?

BTW: I think you have a great tag:

“Love and Justice Served Up With Faith”.

I think that goes very well with Debby’s

”FAITH WITH AN EDGE . . . CROSS MY HEART!”

I’d like to see you and Debby do a dual Christmas novella. How about “Yule Never Know”? (About secret special forces operations the public can never be told about!)

Please put me in for a chance on your book. I specialize in debut books. : )

Vince

Jane said...

Referring to my last comment, I think that writing chose me. It seems I was always writing something--ridiculous short stories when I was a child, journals as I grew older, then writing for publication. For an introvert like myself, writing is a way of connecting with the world. Of course the rejection part of writing is painful and always will be. You'd think after 30 plus years of doing this, I'd be inured to rejection. Not so. Each rejection still hurts. How do you handle rejection? I'd say digest copious amounts of chocolate, but that is not a good solution for someone who receives as many "Thanks, but no thanks" letters and emails as I do.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Sandra!!!! I'M NOT BOSSY!!! I PREFER THE TERM SUPREME MICROMANAGER OF THE UNIVERSE WHEN GOD'S OTHERWISE OCCUPIED!!!

(sighs.....)

Jane, what a good point about rejection. I think lots of folks think that can't/won't/doesn't happen once you're published. Of course it does... but the lovely option of independent publishing is an amazing support and offshoot of traditional publishing. My indie books bring me new readers for my traditional books and vice versa.

I love it.

That way stories that might be too risky for a publisher to invest in can find their wings with readers and take off.

We are overwhelmingly blessed these days!

And I'm assuming everyone is working hard, right????? :)

Jane said...

How many of you are pantser and how many are plotters? I want to be a plotter but always end up being a pantser. Does anyone else share those feelings?

marilyn leach said...

Jane, I love the way your examples amplified the point you were making. Great article. Our character's moral compass, I've found anyway, can also produce great humor when they find themselves in a tenable position. By the way, I'm very much plotter. Thanks for sharing, Jane. Cheers

Lyndee H said...

My hand is in the air, Jane. I am a pantser, although I've tried really hard to evolve into a plotter!

And I have computer operator problems here, too, and nothing fries me more than when DH rides in on his white horse to save me with just one click! I'm always so sure I've deleted the entire WIP. How does he do that? Whew...

DebH said...

Jane
awesome post. i believe i am a pantser. i've always wanted to tell stories, but mostly through my drawings. i'd draw, then make up a story most of the time. guess that's what made me a pantser. get and idea and then sorta run with it.

RUTHY: almost spewed the afternoon cuppa Joe with the Supreme Micromanager of the Universe when God's otherwise occupied thing. Between coaching volleyball and taking care of the Gupster's sniffles this week, I've gotten nothing done *heavy sigh* Wish i could say i've been hard at work, but that isn't true. (no chocolate for me...*double sigh*)

oh, and Jane, please put my name in the draw for your debut LIS. The blurb is uber interesting.

Jane said...

Vince, thank you so much for your kind comments about the blog. I love writing about military heroes. I have a special place in my heart for those who serve our country. My father served in the Navy in WWII, wounded in a torpedo attack on his ship. He was offered the opportunity to return home (his mother had already lost two sons), but he refused, saying he wanted to stay where he was. He ended up writing the families of the men who died that day and became friends with many of those family members. Sorry. I get carried away when I think of the brave men and women who serve our country.

Jane said...

Vince, as I said, I got carried away talking about military heroes, in particular my father. To answer your question about the cover art, the truth is I don't know. I was just pleased that the cover art and the blog picture (courtesy of L.A. Sartor) matched so well. It was a complete accident.

Jane said...

Ruth,that's great that you can do both traditional and indie publishing. You must be an ultra-talented writer. Not all of us can make that cross-over. Ny dream is to make enough at writing that I can call it a "living wage." If our family had to live on what I made, we would be in a refrigerator box under a bridge!

Jane said...

I love it! We're a bunch of plotters and pantsers. I'm trying to come to peace with what I am (just as I'm trying to come to peace with the size of my thighs, but that's another problem. I think the Father wants us to always improve but to also accept who and what we are. After all, He created us.

Jane said...

Lyndee, I'm sorry that you have computer problems but relieved that I'm not the only one out there who suffers from the occasional "operator problem." My husband, BTW, is a mechanical engineer. Very left-brained. My poor right-brain struggles to keep up. That may also explain why I'm a pantser and not a plotter.

Jane said...

Marilyn, thank you for the comment about the "moral compass." And you're right--humor can result when our moral compass takes over. One time at the Post Office, I discovered that the clerk hadn't charged me enough. I went back, explained, and tried to give the money back. The poor clerk was so flumoxed that she didn't know what to do. She finally said that it would "mess up" her cash drawer something awful if I gave the money back. I left it at that, but I still remember the incident 24 years later. Can you tell that it still bothers me?

Jane said...

DebH, how wonderful that you can tell stories through your drawings. I do well to draw a stick figure and even that claim is questionable!

Audra Harders said...

Jane, I'm a diehard pantser who has learned how to outline! Please do not call it plotting...that give me shivers. BUT creating an outline helps me manage the little suckers of ideas that tend to derail my story before I type THE END.

Audra Harders said...

Lyndee! High Five!! I'm all over that "did I delete my entire manuscript???"

Jane said...

Unfortunately, I can relate all too well to deleting my entire manuscript AND not having a back up. Heartbreaking and terrifying.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I agree on the disappearing work syndrome....

Now I have Norton backup and I save to the cloud and the computer.... BUT!!!

I didn't know I had to initiate the Norton backup: OOPS!!!!!

Sigh. I call that Slow Learning Curve on Fast Road to Destruction.

But the work that disappeared for over a day, poured back into both the computer and the cloud....

How strange, odd and HAPPY!!!!

Jane said...

I know many of you have "day" jobs in addition to your writing. For those who don't have regular jobs, do you write other things to supplement your book writing income?
I'm always interested in how writers support themselves.

Missy Tippens said...

Leslie Ann, I've heard someone else recommend Scrapple lately. I need to check it out!

As for plotter or pantser…

I'm a pantser turned plotter who recently tried a novella without much plotting and am still not sure how that worked for me. :)

Missy Tippens said...

Oh, Jane! A whole manuscript lost??? The thought makes me want to cry.

Vince said...

Hi Jane:

My uncle was also sunk by torpedoes. He was on the USS Vincennes, a cruiser off Guadalcanal, in August of 1942. Four ships were lost to the very superior Japanese long lance torpedoes. He said they were fired from 10 miles away! He was in the engine room and was knocked out of the war with serious leg injuries but he survived and lived a long life. He just might have known your father. That really was a great generation.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Jane, money is always a good question.

When I was offered contracts with Love Inspired (which I love!) I knew the key to category growth is/was production. So I focused on that (with my day job going....)

Once I saw my numbers climbing with Love Inspired, and got beyond my FEAR!!!! I put out my first of three inspirational indie novels last year.

Between the two sales venues, yes, it's a livable income... and then this year brought more contracts, another indie book and some lovely novellas!

What a huge difference. The leap of faith was believing every author that said writing a good book... and then writing MORE... is clutch. With the indie market wide open to us, I knew I had several good books that weren't making the cut in CBA but I was convinced the public would embrace them. They did.

So if you're looking for the stability that comes from multiple income streams (that guards against losing income if we lose a contract or an editor) I highly recommend sticking your feet into the indie waters. Honestly, the water's fine!

:)

For almost a year I waffled... That was me being silly. It was one of the smartest moves I ever made and those cross-over readers are a true blessing.

E-mail me if you want to chat more, I don't want to take up your blog space!!!

Sherida Stewart said...

Jane, the blurb for Keeping Watch sounds fascinating! Congratulations on your debut! Thanks for your thought-inspiring post.....my mind is working on my characters' moral compasses. Hmmmmm.....Great!

Cara Lynn James said...

I think some character flaws are much more acceptable than others. You can be a reformed alcoholic, but not a reformed child molester, or adulterer.

Mean, vile people don't work too well either.

Valri said...

Interesting post today, Jane! As a reader I enjoy learning about all these things that writers think about as they write!

Leslie Ann aka LA said...

Jane and Audra,
Back ups. There is a post I do annually and I can't tell how relieved I am when I have a problem that BackBlaze is there for me:
http://anindieadventure.blogspot.com/2012/12/my-annual-reminder-this-could-be-one-of.html

Secondly, I'm a panster who is learning to do more plotting... by necessity.

Hugs
LA

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Jane, Your name sounds so familiar. Did we meet in Atlanta with Lia Brown? Is that where I know you from? I looked on your website to find other books you've written.

Looks like you've had a great day. Lots of great comments. smile

I think I better work more on the backup issue. I get lax sometimes.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Ruthy, Did I SAY you were bossy????

And are you SAYING you're not????

Oh my. Miscommunication. chuckle

Micromanager hmmmmmmm interesting. I wonder if that will work with my family. LOL

I totally get the "when God is otherwise occupied" thing. So wise.

Chill N said...

Haven't had a chance to read comments but thanks for such an informative post!

Nancy C

Jane said...

Ruth, you are truly inspiring with your "multiple streams of publishing." Good for you. I haven't been brave enough to try indie publishing.

Jane said...

Vince, how interesting that your uncle's ship was also torpedoed. My father also suffered injuries. I'm sure my mother (they were married right before he shipped out) would have wanted him to come home. As you say, that was the greatest generation. There was no sense of entitlement, only sacrifice and hard work.

Jane said...

Cara Lynn, you are absolutely right when you say that some flaws are more acceptable than others. It's a good thing to remember when we're "drawing" our characters.

Jane said...

Sandra, I think we did meet in Atlanta--at an Avalon party?

Jane said...

Valri, thank you for your kind words. This writer, for better or worse, thinks of all sorts of strange things when she writes!

Jane said...

Seekerville is always so welcoming and supportive. You are fortunate to have each other as support in this crazy business that we've chosen ... or that chose us.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Jane, I thought we had, but my old brain doesn't always remember like it used to ha ha. But I guess we did pretty good.

I'm so tickled that you found a home in LI. I think you will be happy there as all of the authors I know who write for them are really happy. Best wishes.

Happy writing.

Thanks again for joining us today.

Mary Preston said...

A wonderful post thank you.

Michelle said...

Sounds like an interesting book. I've read quite a few southern mysteries. I have been to Virginia and Kentucky (the northern part, just across from Cincinnati).