Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Lazy Website Syndrome

with guest Matt Jones of Jones House Creative.

“My website is lazy.”

It’s an odd sentiment. Kind of like calling your car lazy for sitting in the garage. But then again, it’s not, is it? Your website, for all intents and purposes, is like a 24-hour store. Always open and ready for business. You’re like the store’s owner, and the site is your team of employees. Each part of your site, each page, is like a different department of your store, offering something unique to your customers, whether it’s information, a product, entertainment, instructions…whatever. 

But, what if your employees are lazy? What if they aren’t giving people what they want or offering them the information they need to make the decision to buy from you? What if the way your employees look is making people not want to be around them? What if the employees are giving people outdated or incorrect information? Or, worse, what if your employees are misrepresenting you and people are leaving your store because they have the wrong impression of you and your product?

Yikes. 

What then? Well, it may be time to get into your store and clean house a bit, because your website can, and should, work diligently night and day for you, and, with a little bit of effort, it will. But first, you need to have an idea of what your website should do for you and what you should do for your site.

What is my web site is supposed to do for me?  

I like Shrek. He’s got layers…like an onion. And, like Shrek, your site’s purpose is layered, too. 

The first layer of that purpose is what I’ll call The Broad Picture: to give a clear representation of who you are, what you have to offer, and how your site visitors can get what you have to offer. Plain and simple. You have something to offer that you want people to buy, and your site’s job is to help people find what you’re offering and buy it.

But there’s a second layer, a little deeper and more psychologically interesting layer. It’s called The Proof. You have to answer your customers’ question, “Why are you an expert? Or, in the case of authors, ‘why are your stories worth my time and money?” This is where you dig deep and present yourself to your readers in a more personal way, showing them that you have skill and passion to provide them a meaningful, impacting journey through your writing and through interaction with you in your website.

A third layer, and probably the most important, is what I’ll call The Core. It answers the question, “How will you meet my need?” Another way of labeling it is “the takeaway.” Think about it: what are your site visitors most concerned about? Themselves. No, not in a negative way, but the simple fact that they are online, visiting websites, more than likely with a cup of coffee in their hand and wearing pajamas, means that in that moment, they aren’t thinking about how they can help the world. They’re looking for something that will do them good or meet a need THEY have. What will your site give them as their takeaway?




What should you do for your website to keep it from being lazy? 

The question isn’t really, “Why isn’t my website doing much for me?” I kinda think that that’s a backward way of thinking. If we’re honest, we know the real question we have to answer is “Whose responsibility is it to make my website work?” It’s yours. 

Think about this: if you haven’t changed the oil in your car, can you blame your car for breaking down and not getting you to the airport on time? Nope. If you don’t put gas in it, will it operate properly? Nope. If peanut M&M’s roll across the dashboard and fall into the defroster vents…you get where I’m going. In short, it’s important to put thought and effort into your website if you want it to run properly. You have to give your “employees” the right tools, the right uniform, and the right training so they can offer the best experience to your customers. How does that translate into action you can take? Well, it’s pretty straightforward: 

1. update content regularly (blogging helps), 
2. keep imagery fresh, and,
3. when necessary, overhaul the whole thing with a new look and features.

Money Talk…

Now, I’ve been posed with the question before, “If my website isn’t doing much for me, why should I pay a lot of money to have a new one built?” This question is a tad more difficult for me to answer without sounding self-serving, so I’ll try to just illustrate (sans-flannelgraph).

Imagine you’re running your dream business; for the sake of this story, we’ll say it’s a flower boutique. You come to work one morning and find your air conditioning units have stopped working. So what do you do? You jump online and look up repair companies. (HINT: the ones with the best SEO, or Search Engine Optimization, will come up first…something to think about…) 

You click www.JacksQualityAir.com simply because it’s the first result within ten miles of your shop and…the website is a blank white page with one photo of a repair guy, presumably ‘Jack’, standing in front of a dirty, nondescript wall. The words “Jack’s Quality Air” are written way off on the right in Comic Sans font, and the huge, red words “COMING SOON” sit in the middle of the page right above a phone number. You click your back button as quickly as you can, hoping the image of Jack isn’t burned into your retinas.

You click the next result, www.DavisandSonsAC.com, and, lo-and-behold, a clean, professional-looking site pops up. The colors are cool and inviting. There are pictures of smiling faces. There are several clearly-placed logos from air conditioner manufacturers you recognize. Right there in the colorful image slider at the top of the page are the words, “Did your air conditioner just quit? We can fix it. Call 470-blah-blah-blah and our team of professionals will come fix it today.”

Do these websites ACTUALLY tell you anything about who will do a better job? No, but the professionalism and pleasing aesthetic of Davis and Sons won you over. Without even thinking about it, you were influenced by the site that engendered a feeling of professionalism and trust simply based on its presentation. Did Davis and Sons pay more for their site? Without question. But their return on investment far outstripped the cost of the site. They get business while poor Jack doesn’t.

This is a great illustration of what your website should be doing for you. It should be engendering trust and confidence in your site visitors so that they view you in the way you want them to. I’m not suggestion that anyone misrepresent themselves, but I strongly encourage everyone to remember that, as a writer or a speaker or even a business owner, your website is your first impression to much of the world. People will see your books in a bookstore and immediately try to find www.YourName.com. What they find when they arrive at your site will, whether fairly or unfairly, influence them in their regard for your writing. Your website is your resumé, your Sunday best, your fireworks show, and your little black dress all in one. It has to wow people and leave them wanting more. 

Tips on how to evaluate if your website is doing its job

So, how do you determine if your site is doing its job? Here are a few tips:

1. Track. Your. Site. Website stats aren’t nearly as mysterious as some people think. Knowing the first few steps and then being willing to get your feet wet will go a long way to understanding and maintaining your site. A few stats you’ll want to track are how people are finding your site, what pages in your site are most popular (and which ones aren’t), how long people stay on your pages, and what links get clicked the most. Use that information as leverage to improve pages people don’t stay on very long, place popular links on more pages, and put “Call to Action” (like “Buy my book!”) on pages people visit most and stay longest.

2. Work on your SEO (search engine optimization). Place content in your site that, when indexed by the big search engines, will help your site climb up in search results. A simple Google search on “SEO for my website” will give you tons of great information and tools to help your site. If you use a content management system like Wordpress, Typepad, Joomla, or Drupal, you’ll have loads of plugins and add-ons available that can help you prep your SEO, too.

3. Get feedback. I’m not a big proponent of using polls on your site, simply because that isn’t why people came to your site, but sometimes, a little bit of  customer feedback can help. If you blog, use a blog post and its comments to connect with your visitors and find out about their experience on your site. NOTE: giveaways help. :)


So, what do you think? Do you have a lazy website? What help do you need? If you don’t, what are some tips you have to keeping your site working for you?



Matt won't toot his own horn, so we'll do it! 

Here are just a small sample of the Seekers and Friends of Seekerville who have websites designed by the Jones House Creative Team.

Pam Hillman

Myra Johnson

Dan Walsh

Elizabeth Goddard

Melissa Tagg

Leave a comment today for an opportunity to win a $10 Amazon gift card. Winner announced in the Weekend Edition.


All about Matt Jones of Jones House Creative:

With nearly thirteen years of experience in graphic and web design, Matt is still the first to admit he is constantly learning. “In a field where progress and change is a daily activity and innovation is key, I have to keep learning, keep expanding, and adding new techniques and knowledge to my arsenal. The good thing is, I love it.”


While he enjoys the satisfaction of seeing a well-thought-out design come together, Matt also enjoys all kinds of creativity. A professional bass-player and budding writer, Matt spends his free time enjoying music, hanging out with his amazing wife and three kiddos, and trekking across country in search of beauty and adventure.



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86 comments:

Mary Preston said...

I must say that I do enjoy visiting author websites.

Cindy W. said...

I visited several of the websites Matt has designed and they are absolutely beautiful. I especially loved Pam Hillman's with the western theme.

Smiles & Blessings
Cindy W.

Tina Radcliffe said...

WELCOME, MATT.

We have a manly breakfast loaded onboard Seekerville today. Sausage and biscuits!

Rawhide!

Tina Radcliffe said...

Oh, my. My webpage is laying on its back snoring.

I think the concept of knowing what you want is important too.

Hard to tell a design person what you want if you don't know what you want!

I'm with you, Mary Preston. I love visiting author sites.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Question for you Matt.

With many people using phones and iPads for web trolling these days, is FLASH out of vogue?

Tina Radcliffe said...

I'll tell you my pet peeve about author web pages. Inability to find the CONTACT for the author.

Makes me insane.

Jackie said...

Hi Matt,

I met you a few years ago at an ACFW conference. (Maybe a James Scott Bell class?) I remember you were super nice and so smart.

Thanks for sharing with us today. When I sail off unpubbed island, I'll be coming to you for help. For now people tell me a blog is all I need. Do you agree?

Thanks!

Matthew C Jones said...

Blogs are great platforms for building, well, a platform, getting your expertise out there, and building community. But theu army for everybody. Some authors have the gift for it while others would rather just write. A website can help those authors have a place online for people to find out about their books, their personality, etc. Having your blog or site hosted on your own domain name is my strongest recommendation, whether you blog regularly or not.

Matthew C Jones said...

Not as much and definitely not as intricately as it used to be. It's a massive resource hog, and with Apple devices no longer supporting it, loads of users will never see Flash content. And, a big deal these days is that Flash isn't always mobile friendly.

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks Cindy! Pam's was a lot of fun to create, but I have to admit, she had a big hand in her site's look! She's a creative one, she is.

Matthew C Jones said...

Sounds perfect! Grabbing my coffee...

Jeanne T said...

Matt, I loved this post, and the helps you offered here. I don't have a website, but I do blog. I'm trying to make sure I do the best I can, but I'm not as knowledgeable as I'd like to be. So, this post is helpful.

Do you have suggestions for helping blogs that aren't currently attached to websites? I'm in Jackie's shoes. Not quite ready to start a website, but wanting to make my blog as friendly and searchable as possible.

cathyann40 said...

I love visiting authors sites.

Kav said...

I love visiting author websites too and my pet peeve is when they don't keep up to date with their book releases. Drives me crazy. I'll read a book, love it and rush over to the author website, pen in hand, ready to write down every book they've ever written only to find that the last book listed was published four years ago and they don't even have the current book I've just read listed on their site. Gah!

And I love when they list what's coming soon -- even if they don't have a book cover. So if I'm reading a series, I can go to the author site and find out when the next book is going to be released. That's such a bonus.

Matthew C Jones said...

Hi Jeanne, great question. I think you just have to ask yourself the question, "Where do I see this going?" If you think you'll eventually want your own domain name, why not register it now? It's typically only $10-15 per year, and it sets you up for people to start following your blog from your own domain rather than hosted on another blog platform. As for being searchable, I just encourage bloggers to use categories and tags well so their posts are easy to search and able to be indexed easily by search engines.

Marianne Barkman said...

Good morning! I love visiting authors pages, too! You do a fantastic job, Matt! I'm with Jeanne and Kav....
Thanks, Tina for having Matt here today

Cynthia Herron said...

Excellent tips and insight, Matt! *waves* And I WILL toot Matt's horn. Matt's managed my website for years, and he's a wonderful go-to resource for all things social media. JHC responds quickly to my questions and concerns, even the silliest ones. :) It's great to have a tech-savvy, Christ-oriented social media team who sees the big picture and can guide me as I move forward in my career.

Another thing that's a plus with a social media/website team like JHC is their willingness to help you refine your brand and showcase who you are in the best possible light.

AND for those who may not know--Matt's a previous Genesis winner. :)

Matthew C Jones said...

Wow, thanks Cindy. I think I'm actually blushing :) We definitely love working with you and all our clients!

Rachael Koppendrayer said...

I love author sites, since so many have something extra (more historical information on their books, cover reveals, chapters that didn't make it into the final book, etc). As I'm not on Facebook, it's the best way for me to keep up with what the author is doing. So yes, I also much prefer up-to-date sites.

Connie Queen said...

Good morning Matt.

I'm unpublished so I don't have a website either. I have checked out website names, and I wished ConnieQueen.com wasn't already taken. This is tacky, but I really wished that lady would forget to pay her renewal fees. :)

I don't look up author websites often, but I agree that is you're going to have one, keep it up-to-date and make it professional. You're ac example is perfect.

Myra Johnson said...

Welcome, Matt!!!! So great to have you as our guest in Seekerville and to learn even more about the important ways a website should be working for us!

Yes, Matt did my newly redesigned website, and I am SO happy with it! He also gives great tutorials to help his clients get familiar with the inner workings of their sites so they can make simple updates themselves.

I'm proud to say I've known Matt for several years, back when we were in the same ACFW chapter in Tulsa, OK. The members' first real taste of Matt's design talents were the absolutely gorgeous one-sheets he created for several ACFW members--OH WOW!!!!

And . . . if I may recommend one more spectacular website Matt recently redesigned, it belongs to my very dear friend Carla Stewart. Matt is really great at creating websites that match each client's tastes, personality, and (for authors) genre.

Barbara Scott said...

Hi Matt,

Your post made me realize how much I DON'T know. I have a unique situation. Lots of people in the CBA market know that I was an acquisitions editor and that I still edit on a freelance basis. Here's my online footprint:

Facebook Friends: 1,401 (www.facebook.com/Barbara.Scott01?ref=hl) and (www.facebook.com/BarbaraJScott01)
Twitter Followers: 1,145 (@BarbaraScott01)
Website: www.heartlandeditorial.com
Book: www.sedonastorm.com

And I used to blog...operative words "used to."

Now I've leaped back into the author pool after a 20-year hiatus, and I'm clueless how to leverage all that into an author website and other social media. Can I just redesign my Facebook pages? I've tried to snag BarbaraScott.com, but you can imagine how unavailable that is. I might as well be named Jane Doe.

Any tips? Please, I need a lifevest soon.

Thanks!
Barbara

Dan Walsh said...

Really like mine. Matt nailed it (got exactly what I was hoping for). And one of the best parts is, he combined the website and blog onto 1 site. Also, I can do 95% of the text updates myself.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Now, that's what I like! One stop shopping. Blog and website in one!

Tina Radcliffe said...

Cynthia Herron! Must visit your site next!!

Ruth Logan Herne said...

These sites are beautiful! Well done! They make me smile, just looking at them.

I brought strawberry rhubarb pie today, a festival pie for Memorial Day weekend. Homemade, because that's how much you guys are L-O-V-E-D. :)

Matt, can you ballpark cost for us?

Ruth Logan Herne said...

And great job creating reflective websites for individuals. I love that, Matt!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks Connie. And you can usually find appropriate variations on domain names, perhaps ConnieQueenBooks.com for example.

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks Myra!

Pam Hillman said...

Welcome to Seekerville, Matt. Great tips on keeping a clean house. In spite of having an awesome website designer :), deadlines have gotten in the way of a bit of housekeeping on my part.

I have about 3 books with links I need to upload.

Hey, that's a good thing, but they need to be there for the customer to see them. :)

Sandy Smith said...

Interesting post, Matt. Don't know if I'll ever need a website, but it is fun to read this. I agree with some of the others that being able to easily find updated information is
crucial. One of my pet peeves about any website is when you have to do too many clicks in order to find basic information. The other thing that drives me crazy is when it is difficult to find contact information.

Please enter me for the Amazon card!

Matthew C Jones said...

Hi Barbara, wow, I feel your pain :) Social media is great, just be sure you're going where people are. You have to find your fans on the networks they go to. As for your site, people seem to like being able to visit their favorite author's "home" as opposed to their booth at the local swapmeet. :) Featuring your social media on your site is a very viable way to link those channels and keep people coming to you online.

Sherida Stewart said...

Matt, the websites you have created are motivating.....beautiful.

My website does need more attention. Recently I learned I need to make it mobile-friendly, so a major update is needed. In the future I plan to sell something, but right now I have fun blogging about books authors have asked me to promote along with occasional inspirational thoughts.

Your post is a keeper with great points to make my website work better. Thank you!

Matthew C Jones said...

I love strawberry rhubarb :) Give us a call and we'll ballpark for you.

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you Ruth!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks Dan!

Pam Hillman said...

I see some of you are in the same boat I was for a while.

Long before I was contracted, I created a website using a blogging platform that looked a lot like a website. I don't recommend this! :) Wordpress is SO much easier, but I don't think that was available back then. I know just enough about website design and maintenance to be dangerous, but the good news is that by trial and error, I learned a lot of what I did like and what I didn't.

Even though it wasn't perfect, it served my purpose until had an idea what I needed on a professional website. And, as Matt said, even back then, I bought my website domain and had it pointing to my blog masquerading as a website. I also had a separate blog in blogger, but it wasn't very active, and i wasn't too worried about losing visitors when I decided I needed a professional website.

Three things I wanted on a new website was Buy Widgets, an integrated blog, and to be able to maintain it myself. Well, and I wanted it to be rustic, charming, and pretty!

And even though content is king, us visual folks concentrate on the aesthetics first. (ie. I look at the lines of a new car, the color, the leather seats; my husband wants to pop the hood. It's just the way we're wired. :) Matt was very patient as I tweaked the visual aspects of my website, even when I didn't have a clue if what I was asking for could be done.

My site reflects me, my books, and my rural, country-girl lifestyle. I can upload a video of our baby calves or a couple of bulls fighting, and it will fit right in with the theme, my books, and ME.

I can only be me. :)

Donna said...

Matt, the examples of your work are great! They are truly a work of art!

I hope to need your services one day!

Cheryl St.John said...

Great websites! I need an overhaul too.

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you, Sherida!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you Marianne!

Elaine Manders said...

OMG, my website is on life support. I got it through Wordpress to build my platform, but it's just sitting there, and the platform wouldn't support a hummingbird's tailfeather. Let me see if I can juggle the budget to do something about this.

BTW, those sites you did for the seekers are gorgeous.

Walt Mussell said...

Was updating my website this weekend, as I hadn't looked at it three months. Posted a new post. Made changes to one page. It still looks tired though.

Lyndee H said...

Hi Matt,
Guess I need to tend to my website again. I stopped blogging when one of my dogs died three years ago on the 4th of July. My website featured my writing and my dogs. I just lost heart when she was poisoned. A website revamp would probably help me resolve that loss. Never thought about that until now!

Everyone that know me knows I'm not a techie. I literally have to take out a notebook and follow step-by-step instructions to do things like updating the site. It's just not intuitive. Apparently, I need professional help!

Thanks for the informative post and great examples of your work!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you, Elaine!

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Lyndee, that's actually a great idea and great therapy!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks, Lyndee! If there's anything we can do, just let us know.

Barbara Scott said...

Great advice, Matt. Thanks! I've been thinking of combining my two Facebook pages. I can't seem to keep up with both. Love the analogy of the booth at the local swapmeet. LOL

Janet Dean said...

Matt, welcome to Seekerville! Thanks for providing the lens to look at my Web site. It definitely needs to be refreshed. I sometimes feel like that myself. LOL

I'm impressed with the web sites that Jones House Creative Team created. Do all your web sites allow authors to do update themselves? If so, is this generally more expensive?

Janet

Heidi Robbins said...

Great article! As a reader I'm turned off by author websites that haven't been updated with their current releases and information. My favorite author websites are the ones with a blog that I can follow on my RSS feed reader (I prefer Feedly) so I can be sure to not miss anything :)

Matthew C Jones said...

Hi Janet, on the whole, we build our clients' websites using Wordpress as a content management platform. It makes updating the site much easier and, with so many people using it and developing add-ons for it, it has loads of support online. We do our best to empower our clients as much as we can but always make ourselves available to help as much as they need.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Count me in as someone who will be calling for that ballpark$$ It's time to renovate!

Tina Radcliffe said...

Do you need to know html to update or is it like a wordpress blog?

Matthew C Jones said...

Using Wordpress as your website's framework gives you almost the exact same dashboard as when using a Wordpress blog. There are just a handful of differences. Knowing HTML is a big help, but it isn't a requirement by any means.

Jeanne T said...

As I read Pam's comment, it got me thinking of another question.I purchased my domain name a few years ago. Pam mentioned attaching her domain name to her blog. Did I read that right? And if so, how do you do that? :) Or is that too technical? I'm just wondering. :)

Matthew C Jones said...

If you use Blogger, there are some simple settings you can change to have your blog show up on your domain. Sometimes it depends on your domain's host, so check with them or just do a quick Google search for hosting your blog on your domain.

Jackie Smith said...

I love visiting authors' websites! Enjoyed your post, Matt.
Count me in for the Amazon card, please.

Janet Dean said...

Matt, cool that you're there if your clients hit a snag.

I noticed in your bio that you're also a budding writer. What genre?

Janet

Matthew C Jones said...

Janet, I've finished a historical novel (that's the one that won the Genesis for me a couple of years ago), and I'm working on a contemporary...ahem...romance.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Matt, we love romance here!!! You are among friends!

Sarah Claucherty said...

Tina, a Wordpress website is very similar to a Wordpress blog. I used Wordpress to build my personal website recently, and I found it surprisingly easy, especially if you're already familiar with Wordpress. (Note: almost no programming skills here ;)

Matt, how did you get into website design? And have you been published anywhere yet?

Would love to win the gift card!

Matthew C Jones said...

Sarah, I haven't been published yet, but I love writing so I hope to change that eventually. I've always enjoyed art and graphic design and got into web design working for a ministry about 15 years ago.

Janet Dean said...

Matt, historical novels are my favorite to read and write. Belated congrats on the Genesis final. Stand proud on writing romance. Female readers will be dying to get your perspective.

Janet

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you, Janet! I appreciate your encouragement.

Tina Radcliffe said...

When I did paid blogging I used the customer's Wordpress blogs.Hopefully those brain cells are still around.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Stop by Seekrrville Friday, Matt! We have some critiques up for grabs!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks, Tina!

Myra Johnson said...

I can vouch for the fact that once Matt gets your website up in WordPress, the dashboard is pretty easy to navigate. There are areas I don't know enough to venture into, but for basic content updates, it's pretty straightforward.

And it's great to know he's just a phone call or email away if I have questions. BTW, Matt also took care of transferring my domain registration from my previous web server and now hosts my site, so it's all taken care of in one place by someone I know and trust! Can't ask for more peace of mind!

Missy Tippens said...

Welcome, Matt! Thanks for advice on websites. I do my own, so I know I need to step it up and make it nicer and more user friendly. I can't wait to check out the websites Jones House has worked on! I know I've been impressed by Myra's and Pam's!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks again Myra!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thank you Missy. If there's anything we can do to help, just let me know.

Chill N said...

Super post, Matt. Lots of usable information!

Several years ago, I found a writer new to me even though she had been writing for many years. I went to her website and was delighted to find a downloadable list of her books. Something frustrating: not being able to easily locate where I can subscribe to the writer's newsletter or blog.

The websites are lovely -- as individual as the writers :-)

Nancy C

Tina Radcliffe said...

I don't think I ever mentioned I lived in T town for 17 years. Worked at City of Faith hospital and was Director of Nurses at University Village. Of course back then Jenks was just a small town. :)

DebH said...

whoa, Tina. I was at ORU from 1986 -1990. Doubt if we'd ever have crossed paths though. I pretty much stayed on campus and didn't venture to COF too often. Never really met anyone who worked there...

DebH said...

Matt
as a graphic artist still trying to get feet wet for web programming and stuff, I really appreciate your skill-set. always cool to see how other graphics minded people do things (and be successful at it as well. YAY!)

thanks for posting with Seekerville today. I love it when graphics stuff gets a turn.

A.J. Cattapan said...

I like to *think* I'm doing a good job with my website, but I have to admit that it's just me and a little old WordPress template.

I do watch my stats fairly closely. What I've noticed is that I get the most traffic when I blog while traveling. Therefore, I'll definitely be travel blogging as I head off to Italy and Spain this summer!

Matthew C Jones said...

Thanks Deb!

Tina Radcliffe said...

Well I was on campus often so we might have run into each other. I was in Tulsa until 1993.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Matt, sorry I'm late today but thank you for joining us in Seekerville today. Great analogy of the website to a store with employees. I go in spells. Most of the time I'm right on, but there are periods where I get lazy. Well I don't like to call it lazy. I call it distracted. There are so many things to think of these days in this business. Not that I'm complaining, but sometimes this old brain just doesn't keep up. LOL

Thanks again for being here and I hope you had a terrific time with us.

Mary Connealy said...

Okay, I'm getting my website updated. I hear you!

Tanya Agler said...

Dear Matt, Thank you for the great post on the reasons to maintain a website. As an unpublished author, I often hear people say make sure you have things up and running before you get published. You've given me several excellent reasons to think about investing in a good website. I've never thought of websites in those terms before but there have been times I call one place over another because of the company's website.

Thank you for the suggestions. It's amazing when a lot of people address an issue all around the same time, you start listening a lot more closely. Websites have been coming up a lot lately in terms of marketing and self-promotion and you've added layers on top of the discussions. And you've certainly given me a lot more to think about. Thanks.

Julie Lessman said...

MATT!!!!

OH. MY. GOSH!!! I cannot believe I am late on Matt day!!! Please forgive me, my friend, but we are in the process of downsizing from two houses with almost 40 years of accumulation to a tiny place with almost NO STORAGE in TEN DAYS, so I have been CRAZY with pitching and packing.

GREAT blog and also very eye-opening. I'm pretty sure I have a lazy website because I haven't touched it in a long while and I even forgot to blog this week on my usual Friday -- a first for me, so that shows you how nuts I've been (okay, more "nuts" than usual, I guess).

One of these days, Mr. Jones, you will hear from me when I have the time to update because you are THE BEST!!

Not only at websites, but at videos too. You just flat-out ROCK!!

Hugs,
Julie

Deanna Stevens said...

Some great information, I only do reviews but I can see where I could improve my lazy site..
toss me into the dish please..

Janet Kerr said...

Great information, Matt. This will help when I get going.
Thank you,
Jan

ohiohomeschool said...

Thank you! I am afraid I am falling into this with my business blog.
Please enter me in the contest.
Becky

Anna Weaver Hurtt said...

Great tips, Matt! I'm always looking for ways to make my website better.