Thursday, February 25, 2016

Cooperative Working: Writing a Continuity With Other Authors

Ruthy here, introducing an author who needs no introduction! Cheryl St. John is the author of many books in multiple genres, and one of the ladies I run to when I want to hear advice and hear it straight! Cheryl is working with two other amazing authors on a historical continuity for Love Inspired Historicals, and with all the fun going on at Love Inspired Historicals right now, I knew you'd love to hear more about this! 

Take it away, Cheryl!


Cowboy Creek is Love Inspired Historical’s Spring continuity series set in a Kansas boomtown and featuring brides who come west to marry following the Civil War.

April: Want Ad Wedding, Cheryl St.John
May: Special Delivery Baby, Sherri Shackelford
June: Bride By Arrangement, by Karen Kirst

I truly enjoy writing these series books, working with other fabulous authors and following guidelines set up by the editors.

When the author is given a brief synopsis and character outlines to work from, their job entails making the story their own, through characterization, backstory and internal conflict, while staying on track with the outline and working with the other authors’ characters and ideas. It’s a challenge. There are hundreds of details to work out as well as facts, names, places, dates to stay accountable to, and all the stories must flow together.

I might seem pretty seat-of-the-pants, but I’m truly a detail person in this regard, so having the first deadline in the series, I drew a map of Cowboy Creek and enlisted Sherri and Karen’s help in placing businesses and homes. We shared a Pinterest board, so we could easily describe and identify characters we were sharing. You can see our board here.


There were so many characters to keep track of that this definitely helped our process.

For each story I write, I create a Pinterest board, which is handy for several reasons. It’s great reference when you want to remember what a character looks like or describe their clothing. As a group, we added to this board, so we had each other’s characters to reference as well. As soon as the book is finished (and often before the book is finished if it’s scheduled) the author is asked to fill out Art Fact Sheets. Having all of these character photos, plus scenery and cover ideas in one place is extremely helpful at this stage. LIH asks for the photos in a Word document, so you can gather them all on your board, then download and insert them in Word docs to send the art department. The better photos you send, the better cover you’re likely to get. It’s a good idea to find other comparable covers or photos you like to assure the cover you’d like to see.



To stay coordinated on a project like this, the authors must constantly update secondary character information, names, traits, businesses, jobs, etc.. This can be done with file sharing, like yahoo groups or google docs. We had a yahoogroup, where we asked questions of each other and kept track. A google calendar can also be valuable for keeping track of the months your story takes place. The key to a multi-author project is communication.

Like planning any other book, the author finds something that excites her within the period in history, has in mind the tone she wants to set, creates backstory and builds conflict and emotion to sustain the book to its end. I kept in mind the emotional wounds of the people and our country during this time. I wanted to show the bravery of the women who traveled to an unknown land in hope of a new and better life—sometimes out of sheer desperation. To keep a historical authentic it’s important to know and understand the political and social climates of our setting and time period. There are so many resources to help with this. We can read journals, diaries, cookbooks, travel logs, find photographs, study the politics, art and music of not only the year the story happens, but the formative years of our characters’ lives. People are a result of their history and upbringings. Events change people. War changes people and countries.


And because I write romance, I wanted to give my characters a new beginning and a second chance at happiness. Themes of forgiveness and second chances consistently run through my stories, because that’s what life is all about. That’s what Jesus is all about. I’ve had the pleasure of reading them all, and I believe you’re going to thoroughly enjoy these three stories.




I’ll draw from the comments for three copies of Want Ad Wedding. Mention whether you’d like a print copy or if you’d prefer a .mobi mailed to your Kindle address. 

NEWSFLASH VIA SHERRI SHACKELFORD! Sherri is also offering three copies of Special Delivery Baby either print (when they arrive) or a .mobi file mailed to your Kindle! Thank you, ladies!


And exciting news: Sherri and I are currently writing yet another Cowboy Creek installment, Christmas in Cowboy Creek for the Love Inspired Historical western Christmas anthology. Two more stories set in Cowboy Creek!



 Ruthy again! Cheryl, I'm so glad you were here, thank you!!!

I've got flapjacks on the griddle and a pot of fresh, strong coffee, some sweet tea, and some of my cousin's maple syrup from back East! Come on in, let's chat writing historicals and writing together... What do you think the toughest aspect of writing with a group would be?

I can't wait to hear what you say!

91 comments :

  1. Great post Cheryl! I've read a collection of novellas in the past written by different authors but there was continuity with both plot & characters. I was so pleasantly surprised and thought how can this be? Must be a lot of coordinating and good friends? Lots of meetings? Thanks for sharing this. It's amazing what authors can do with their technology and their innovations.

    Thanks for the giveaway and I'd prefer a print copy. Happy weekend!

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  2. Welcome, Cheryl! I just love continuities. Love, love them. And the cover of Want Ad Wedding is especially gorgeous!!

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  3. Thank goodness for yahoogroups, Just Commonly, because it's invaluable for communication on a project like this. I've done a lot of the Montana Mavericks series as well, which usually include 12 authors in each new series. Granted there are some who don't participate in the group, but I think the stories reflect that. I've been blessed to work with some great authors on these projects.

    Thank you, Tina! I love this cover, too. She's adorable and he's such a gentleman.

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  4. I would think the hardest part is keeping all the details straight when working with several authors! But I can see where Pinterest boards and file sharing on groups would be very handy & helpful. Since I consider myself a visual person, having pictures of people, places and things would help me get a better idea of the story, characters, and scenery. And I love perusing on Pinterest for pictures of various things....I've quite often gotten lost in there before...haha! :-)

    Ruthy, I'll come back in the morning for some fresh flapjacks, maple syrup and coffee as it's a little late in the evening when I am writing this :-) Thanks for the post Cheryl, it's always insightful to learn of the authors process of writing a story. I think it would be fun to work with a group and hash out details! I bet there are some great ideas that come out of them :-) Please add my name to win a paperback copy of "Want Ad Wedding". I just read the synopsis over on Amazon, it has my two favorite elements in a historical....mail-order bride and marriage of convenience...what a perfect combination! Thank you for the chance :-)

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  5. Thank you, Cheryl for a great post. I love long stories that have Getty characters, so continuity works great for me. Md I love series!

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  6. Lovely cover, Cheryl! I think I'd like someone plotting the book for me, but I'd probably flop trying to coordinate with other authors for a series, I change things last minute all the time, and not simple things like hair color, oh no, that would be too easy. And I love MOC's throw me in for a .... I don't know, paperback. :)

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  7. Obviously a lot of co-ordination and co-operation with a continuity series.

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  8. I enjoy reading continuity novels. I don't like having to wait for the next installment but it always is worth the wait.

    It truly amazes me how a continuity, in the end, tends to sound like one voice writing all the novels. I guess that is because the characters and settings are worked out pretty much together by all the authors.

    Blessings to you all today.

    Smiles & Blessings,
    Cindy W.

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  9. Cheryl, this is such a great look at the inside of how we put continuities together. And let me just say These Covers Are to Die For!!!!

    Oh my stars, I want them all, right here, right now! They are a combination of Western charm and holistic warmth.

    Absolutely captivating!

    Thank you so much for being here today!!!

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  10. Welcome back to Seekerville, CHERYL! Reading continuities is so much fun. I've only been a part of one series (with 5 other authors), so I know how much work goes into coordinating something like that! So many decisions that have to discussed and made as a group, and taking care not to have something happen in an earlier book that would negatively impact what a later book's author must to do to stick with the overall continuity plan.

    I love your cover!

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  11. Melissa, you're right.... When you're in the midst of one of these, you have to be careful what you change, but the one I worked on (Big Sky Centennial) the gals were awesome about staying in tune... but also there's plenty of latitude for the author as long as you maintain the story parameters. So it's like being in a box, but a box with wide sides and no interior walls.

    I remember the After The Storm continuity LI and LIH did several years ago. Cheryl, do you remember that? They incorporated historical stories.... and a contemporary continuity, didn't they?

    It was great fun to see the background that began the building of the town we met as a contemporary setting.

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  12. Hey, I've got the griddle on here! Flapjack batter is made and real New York Maple Syrup, fresh from the trees!

    Come on in, folks!

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    1. Be right there! Have been dreaming a griddle breakfast!

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  13. Please put my name in the cowboy hat for Want Ad Wedding. It looks like a great one both inside and on the cover. Thanks for sharing the process for the series. I think I would enjoy the challenge of working with an outline and other writers.

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  14. Hi Cheryl Thank you for giving us such an interesting post today. Your series sounds like fun and showing us the Pinterest board really got me interested. I've never thought of using a Pinterest board in that way and it is really a terrific idea. It helps to keep those characters in mind. I've done the same thing with a bulletin board, but with a pinterest board, you save space. Something I need to do in an RV.

    Thanks again for joining us and have a wonderful day here in Seekerville.

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  15. I had a great time working on this continuity! We didn't use dropbox or any of the filing sharing programs, but in the future I think I'd like to try using one of those. There were a lot of characters that were new/and or provided by the outline to keep track of :) Cheryl was amazing to work with - she had an eye for detail and structure that kept us all working together. Karen had the overwhelming job of wrapping up all the threads.

    I had a lot more fun working within the confines of the outline provided than I thought. I enjoyed the challenge of trying to make all the puzzle pieces work together.

    (Tina/Ruthy - if the winner would like a copy of Special Delivery Baby as well, I will throw that in the hat as soon as the books arrive--which should be this month.)

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  16. Cheryl, This was so helpful today, as I am hoping to begin a historical novel for LI. I will be looking for your book and the rest in the series.

    I would love a print copy of your book.

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  17. Sherri! Yes, they'd love that, sweet thing! Thank you for that offer! I'll add that right in!

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  18. Welcome Cheryl! And I see Sherri's been here, too! Always fun to hear from guest authors :)

    Being part of a continuity sounds like a lot of collaboration and detail coordination, but the idea of writing to suit parameters like that and seeing how you can still write a true-to-your-own-voice story still sounds like fun to me! It sounds like a challenge...which I enjoy a leeeeeettle too much sometimes:)

    I think I had to work on a continuity project like this (on a MUCH smaller scale, of course) once in school. It was interesting!

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  19. Oh, and please add my name to the drawing! I'd love a print copy :)

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  21. CALLING ALL JULIE LESSMAN FANS - I'm interviewing Julie on my blog today (scribblesandsomedays.wordpress.com), and there's a giveaway! The giveaway starts today and runs through March 2. We're sharing 3 copies of Isle of Hope!

    Come by and join the fun! All are welcome :)

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  22. Cheryl,

    I always love your stories and would love to be in the drawing for the print copy.

    I'm going to check out your Pinterest board. I use 'secret' boards for my stories to keep things straight. Do you also use your boards to boost sales?

    Thanks for sharing, and have a great day!

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  23. Cheryl, how exciting to be working on a series together! Thanks for sharing a little of the process. I think that would be so fun.

    Thanks also for sharing the Pinterest board. I keep meaning to do a secret board while writing my next book. This is a good reminder!

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  24. Hello Cheryl! As a reader I enjoy these peeks behind the scenes.

    Have a wonderful day!

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  25. Hi Cheryl, read your craft book last year (WON IT HERE), very helpful. And your post today reminded me that I need to get going on the AFS for the story I'm shopping around now. I also need to delve into the wonders of Pinterest instead of admiring everybody else's stuff. Thanks for some good tips.
    I would love to do a continuity once I'm established as a writer. It sounds like the making of a good stew -- the sum is greater than the parts.
    Please enter me in drawing for print oopy.
    Tks
    Kathy Bailey

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  26. OOPY? I think I meant "copy."
    KB

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  27. Hi, Cheryl! Glad to have you in Seekerville again! These are great tips for staying organized with planning and writing, continuities or otherwise! I have used Pinterest sporadically for collecting photos and other info related to my wips, but I could do better.

    I do agree it's smart to begin gathering character and setting photos from the outset so you're not scrounging around at the last minute to fill out those art fact sheets!

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  28. Cheryl - you have to tell the story of pinning the actor Branton Box to our pinterest board!

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  29. I've never heard of a continuity before. Thanks for sharing your experience of writing a continuity, Cheryl! I'm glad the three of you were able to figure everything out. It sounds like a lot of organizing work on the front end of the project! The stories sound intriguing. :)

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  30. Very interesting post, Cheryl. I love to hear how authors work together on these projects. I think the hardest part would be if any of the authors disagreed on how something should be. I imagine you have to be willing to compromise.

    I would love to be entered for yours and Sherri's book. Either print or electronic is fine for me.

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  31. Jackie, I think Pinterest boards can be an excellent sales tool. Whenever I use my own photos, I add my website address. My website address is also in my profile description. We always want to lead as many people to our website as we can, and have links to our books easy to find.

    I do a board for every story, and I mention it a few times from Facebook and Twitter, so readers can go check it out if they want to. Mine are not private. I want readers to find them and be intrigues by my descriptions. I label photos to explain who the character is or how the photo is used in the setting.

    I just plain love Pinterest, so it's not a hardship for me to use the boards as tools. I use them for fun and inspiration all the time.

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    1. I have used Pinerest for several of my plays in the past and think I will take your advice and set a board for each one!! Thank you! I also want to draw a map of the neighborhood but haven't figured out how to do that yet!

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  32. Sherri reminded me to tell this story: I added the actor Branton Box to the Cowboy Creek board, because I found a photo of him that looked like he would make a good villain. Branton sent me a message, thanking me for using his photo and said he was delighted to be our villain! I have no idea if he's met Kevin Bacon, but it is our brush with fame.

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  33. Cheryl,

    Thanks for sharing more on how you use Pinterest! Have a great day!

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  34. Welcome, Cheryl! A few weeks ago, I started a Pinterest class for authors and it's been quite helpful, as I knew nothing about the site. I've enjoyed building a board for my first book and I know it'll be helpful in preparing my Art Fact Sheet. I can definitely see where Pinterest would be a must while working on a continuity. I'm curious, do you prefer this form of writing? Thanks for stopping by. I'd love to be entered for a Kindle copy.

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  35. Sherri, such generosity! I'd love to be in the drawing for "Special Delivery Baby" as well...thank you! :-)

    Ruthy, thanks for the wonderful breakfast, I'm plumb stuffed!

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  36. I love reading books like this with three different authors and you three are so great together. I can't wait for all three to come out! I wondered when I read them how you can all keep the characters so 'together'. This answers alot. I know you are detailed orientated so this explains how you do it. As you know, I would prefer print copy so I can add to my special Cheryl collection. Thanks special friend.

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  37. Hi Cheryl!!! Loved your post! My current WIP is based during the Korean War so your blog is especially helpful to me, it even helped me with creating a checklist! Thanks so much for that! I loved what you said about war changing people. So true. I have never thought of doing a Pinterest board but what a great idea. I keep photos on my computer as I'm working to help me visualize.

    I think working in a group would be fun but I could see how it would be hard too. I see the characters or story in my head but I think I'd struggle sharing my vision with my group? I can definitely see how the pictures would help that.

    Please toss me in for the drawing - a print copy please. :)

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  38. Good morning, Cheryl! I love those continuities, and I love the group Pinterest board idea. Sometimes technology stinks, and sometimes it's a life-saver. :-) Do you keep the Pinterest board secret while you're building it, or is it public for your followers all along?

    Your stories sound exciting. Please enter me for the kindle version. Thanks!

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  39. Welcome back to Seekerville, Cheryl, and WOW, what a Pinterest board!!! It's so loaded with great things that I'll bet the stories practically write themselves. ;)

    We all know THAT's not true, however, but your process certainly sounds like it helps, so thank you!

    RUTHY ASKED: What do you think the toughest aspect of writing with a group would be?

    For me, the toughest aspect of writing in a group is that my ideas are often so much different than others' ideas, that sometimes it's hard for me to adjust. I've always been the type of author who works alone on everything -- from plotting and brainstorming, to cover ideas -- that fitting into a group is a new experience. Which is why being part of the Seeker novellas has been so good for me -- it's been a lot of fun and taught me I can do it.

    I once had a nun at our high school apologize to me when I was the chairperson for our class during Penny Queen because she didn't think I was a team player. You see, I ended up doing most everything myself, not delegating as much as she thought I should, but when she saw the job I did as solo campaign manager for a gal running for student council, she told me that she finally realized I was one of those people who work best alone. Maybe, but I've discovered that working together in groups is a lot of fun, too, so I'm hoping to do more of that. :)

    Hugs,
    Julie

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  40. Hi Cheryl, thanks for being on Seekerville.
    You're always a welcome guest.

    I've known a couple of people writing continuity series and it's a whole different ball game. Very interesting process.

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  41. Cheryl, writing a continuity calls for teamwork and communication. Thanks for sharing so many great tips on how to keep track of all the story lines, characters and setting/s. Love your use of Pinterest! I can see how that would be a treasured tool when working with other authors.

    Thanks for your generous giveaways today. Waving to Sherri, who also is offering her story. I know the continuity will be read and enjoyed by many.

    Ruthy, thanks for hosting. May I have a flapjack or two and a refill on my coffee?

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  42. This was my second time working on a continuity. I was impressed with how Cheryl jumped right in and got to work on organizing our information. The Pinterest board idea was new to me and so helpful! I hadn't written about this time period before, and Cheryl gave me great insight as to the country's climate and characters' outlooks. Sherri also had wonderful tips. It was such a pleasure working with both ladies!

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  43. Sharee, it's rare that I find the exact perfect photo of a character. I often come close and that has to be good enough. I prefer photos of people who aren't stars, because actors come with roles they've already played (maybe that's why?) and I want the people I have in my head. I don't know if that makes sense, but it probably does. I have an even worse time creating covers for my indie books because I'm never satisfied with the faces.

    xoxo

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  44. Julie, I appreciate continuities for those very reasons. I like the challenge. I believe I've grown and stretched because using the guidelines and working so closely with the other authors. I sometimes have to rethink the way I would do something, and that's not a bad thing. But one of my favorite things to do is brainstorm. I love hearing other people's ideas. It always blows me away when someone comes up with something I would never have thought of, and then it works!

    xoxo

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  45. Cheryl, thank you for this post and sharing your Pinterest board....I love smocking....and the sunflowers in front of the red barn...perfect for a Kansas story! You have inspired me to start boards for my story ideas, Fun! (Any bundt cakes in your book? That would be the tricky part to historicals....knowing when things came into use.) Thank you for all this great advice!

    Congratulations to all three authors on this upcoming collection.....and please put my name in for a print book. Being a lover of old trains, I especially like the depot setting on the cover of Want Ad Wedding! And I'm so excited for a set of historical Christmas stories. Yay!

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  46. Julie, you make an interesting point.

    I'm bossy.

    (Not at bossy as Tina, I do believe I've mentioned that before)

    But I have had to swallow my inner boss so often in adult life because I was a minor cog in bigger wheels, so I learned to feel my way. That's helped me so much with these things because while I still internally want my way (spoiled brat-itis) if I just hush up and let things evolve, everything works out.

    I've had to curb my natural tendency to want everything my own way, and honestly, when I'm working with a bunch of authors, editors, etc., that's been a saving grace.

    And it's made our business relationships absolutely delightful like 95% of the time. Who wouldn't jump on board for a 95% approval rating, right????

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  47. Deb, I've got a fresh pile of flapjacks right here!!!! And a new pot of joe!

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  48. I have a kid eating at the Loveless Cafe in Nashville right now.

    I am a tad jealous.

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  49. Ho exciting that your Pinterest board is open to the public and it inadvertently leads readers to your websites. It is also so cool that the one actor contacted you and thanked you for using his photo. How fun is that?

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  50. It's interesting Ruth & Julie - the most humbling factor for me was realizing that sometimes...just sometimes....not getting my way made things turn out BETTER. I remember early in my marriage being really, really set on something - and finally just giving in. A little bit of me was thinking, "Mm hm. He'll be sorry." Then...shockingly, humbling....the hubby's idea worked out better. That was a learning opportunity ;)

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  51. Not sure if I qualify because I'm not an author. Seem to have trouble understanding the rules. However, if I qualify as a reader, I would love a print copy of Want Ad Wedding. THanks.

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  52. Wow, I must have been asleep last night. I did not see those pictures of the other two books in this series. Karen and Sherri have lovely covers as well.

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  53. Frankly, I am terrified of starting a Pinterest board on my characters. Not that it isn't a great idea..but then I start looking at buttons and coffee and salted caramel. For me, shiny things are not good.

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  54. Sherri, I agree. It taught me to hush up and open my mind... the stop and think button I misplace at times.

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  55. Tina, you missed them?????

    How odd.

    (GRINNING!!!!)

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  56. I am with Tina on shiny things. I've got a smidge of crow in me, shiny stuff veers me off track.

    I use the written word which is crazy prosaic, but I stay focused.

    But I envy the peeps who can do the shiny objects and not fall under their spell!!!

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  57. Why are you grinning, Rufus. Were they NOT there last night? Is this a practical joke?

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  58. Awesome post today. The covers are gorgeous. I love reading continuity series. I am always impressed at how different authors can create practically seamless transitions from book to book. I am impressed with the amount of details involved.

    I would love to be in the draw for either of the books offered, although I am a sucker for doorstop baby stories. Many thanks to the generous Authors for sharing!!!!

    I'm with Tina, shiny things are dangerous... oh look... bunnies!

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  59. LI lines do continuities very well. There were several 5-6 book ones I read years ago, and I was amazed by how well they carried through.

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  60. Wonderful post! I am currently working on my first continuity series, and I am loving the challenge! Your tips are so helpful and timely!

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  61. Ruthy, will you slide a plate of flapjacks my way? I seem to have missed lunch today.

    I do have warm homemade brownies, though, so not all is lost. Toasty warm brownies, anyone?

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  62. I love my baby cover :) She's a cutie.

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  63. It wasn't there last night, Tina.

    So I slipped it in when I realized I hadn't posted the pic....

    But thank you for drawing attention to them (the covers) again! They are awesome!

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  64. Sarah, yes to the flapjacks, honey, and I've got my western apron on to do it!

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  65. Congrats, Erica, on your continuity. Is it for LIH?

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  66. Erica, congrats on getting a continuity!

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  67. LOL, Tina! Yes, I can see salted caramel items distracting me. hahaha I'll have to be careful. :)

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  68. Debbie Clatterbuck, we love readers too! You'll be entered as well. :)

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  69. Very interesting post, Cheryl! Continuities seem hard to me, but also fun to write since they're collaborative. I think you have to be extremely organized and flexible to do these books.

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  70. I visited a few of your Pinterest boards today, Cheryl. You inspired me to start a board for my latest wip. I made it private for now while I decide on images I want to save there.

    Cheryl, do you make your boards public before or after the book is released?

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  71. I love these books, the Love Inspired, mail-order bride and historical, you can't lose with those three things. Then when it's written by a great author you know it will be a winner.

    Thank you for the chance to win a PRINT copy of this book!!!!!

    wfnren at aol dot com

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  72. Oh Cheryl that cover of Want Ad Wedding is terrific! I can scarcely keep the details in my own stories straight, so working with other authors on the same series boggles my mind. I'm glad authors can do it, though, because it's always fun to revisit a place and 'see' characters I already know.

    Please enter me in the drawing for an ebook of Want Ad Wedding.

    Best wishes for your writing!

    Nancy C

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  73. I love your cover and title, Cheryl! I've had LIH readers tell me how much they love series and revisiting characters from previous books. I'm sure readers will be snapping this continuity up. Can't wait to see the books hit the shelves.

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  74. Keli Gwynmeister, I agree.... Like the old "serials" in magazines, I love that readers hurry up and wait for the next installment! I remember women doing that, back when I was younger....

    And I have lots of readers who wait until a whole series is out (even if it's two years), collect all the books and then binge read!!!

    I can totally understand it, even though I don't have the patience to do it!

    Revisiting characters is like going home. Lovely!

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  75. Great post - thank you! The books all look beautiful and sound interesting. Love the idea of compiling pictures of characters, houses, etc. on Pinterest. I found one picture so far -- a terrifying looking dog -- half Australian Cattle Dog and half Alaskan Husky. I actually searched "scary looking dogs" and his picture popped up. Love it!

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  76. Thoroughly enjoyed your post, Cheryl! I'm going to take better advantage of Pinterest and Google calendars in the future. Thank You!

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  77. I love reading collections like this, so interesting to learn how you make it happen! Cowboy historicals are among my favorite reads, I'll be looking for these. Thanks for sharing. If I win, you can send me a whatever format you like!

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  78. Sherida, you made me laugh! No Bundt cakes in this book. lol Hmmm.

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  79. Yay, Erica! I hope you enjoy the challenge! Don't you love how God give us what we need when we need it?

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  80. Myra, I make my boards public, unless it's a story that's really early in the planning stages. I have public boards for indie books I'm plotting and putting together that aren't published yet.

    I'm delighted to have inspired you! I hope you find it a useful tool.

    xoxo

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  81. Cheryl, thanks so much for this helpful post on how you use Pinterest and Google calendars while writing. Would love to win a print copy.

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  82. Reading collections always makes me wonder how so many authors can write such good stories on the same subject.. I enjoyed your post, such research and using Pinterest seems to be a wonderful tool!
    Please toss me into the hat.. I'd prefer paperback.

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  83. What a good use of Pinterest. I'm going to follow your board so I can refer to it while I'm reading the books. Will make for an interesting read by seeing the characters & places through the authors' eyes & not mine.

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  85. I have enjoyed this look behind the scenes. I have always wondered how you manage to work together from across the country. I would enjoy a mobi copy

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  86. I love these glimpses into the writing process! Thank you for sharing your talents, ladies! Please toss my name in the hat for a paperback.

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  87. Thank you for pulling my name out of the hat plus your interesting blogs and great giveaways!

    Wendy

    wfnren at aol dot com

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