Monday, May 9, 2016

Sharing Your Book: Choosing the Right Kind of Promotion for YOU

with Guest Laurie Schnebly Campbell


Sharing your light with the world is good, generous, and loving. Bragging is bad, thoughtless, and selfish.

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What about promoting your work? That could go either way.

Which might explain why very few of us splash ads all over Facebook saying "If you only read one book this year, read mine -- buy it immediately!"

Such promotion is cringe-worthy

And rightfully so. But does this mean we shouldn't promote our work at all?

Maybe we should just leave it up to God?

There certainly ARE things better left up to God, but promoting books is more like making the bed or washing dishes...one of those pesky chores where the best we can do is keep Him in mind while slogging our way through it.

So with that in mind, how do you navigate the difference between sharing your book and boasting about your book?

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After all, either way it's promoting. And choosing the right kind of promo is like choosing a best friend. Everyone has their own preferences and their own stories of success & failure -- often using the same techniques.

If your first thought is "I hate ALL kinds of promotion, but I know I've gotta do some if I want people to know about my books," good for you on recognizing the value of marketing. Given that it's my day job, I know how useful promo can be; but I also recognize it can be intimidating.

That's why it's important to find the type of promotion that best suits your personality. Because if it doesn't feel right for you from the very beginning, you need something you CAN feel okay about doing.

Otherwise promo will loom on the horizon as this gigantic chore that you'd rather skip in favor of writing other books (not a bad thing) -- or, even worse, it'll loom as this dreaded prospect which you'll wind up skipping and instead spend a lot of precious time feeling guilty (a very bad thing).

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So. Onto:

What works for you

Obviously that's going to depend on your own personality type. (No surprise there, right?)

We already know God has given each of us different gifts. Some people are great at honoring the beauty of each moment. Some people are great at making others feel loved. Some people are great at remembering what goes where when.

Some are good at making sour-cherry pie, which is a whole different topic.

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But you probably have an idea of where your gifts lie. Not that you go around bragging about it, except maybe to your very best friend...still, you've noticed things you're good at.

Writing is very likely one of 'em; otherwise you wouldn't be interested in Seekerville. You also might be gifted at coming up with healthy recipes, or singing in the choir, or knitting fabulous scarves, or dozens of other things.

Those gifts are easy to identify, because they're external. Just like external conflict in a book is easy to spot, because it's visible to anyone with a sky-cam.

Internal? Not so much.

It's your internal gifts, though, which set up the kind of promotion you're best at. Are you well-organized? Are you quick-witted? A good listener? A loyal helper?

Each of those personality types, not to mention 30-some others, will be better at a different type of promotion.

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Determining YOUR Type

There are all kinds of ways to do that, and you might've already done it in a psychology class or workbook somewhere. (After all, any of us writers who want to identify the personalities of our characters can easily use the same techniques on ourselves.)

Considering your type, what kind of "sharing" do you do?

Or, to put it another way: What are you good at sharing? Enthusiasm, time, plans, energy, memories, skill, tokens of appreciation? Whatever it is, it's something that comes naturally to you -- because, yes, it's part of your personality.

So when you think about promoting your book, keep in mind that your style of sharing will be different from anyone else's. Just like your style of writing is different from anyone else's -- no two of us would ever tell the story of, say, the fox and the grapes in exactly the same way.

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That means there's a lot of room for promotion that not only fits your personality, but is actually JUST right for you -- because it reflects who you are.

Who You Are is already reflected in your books, so it makes perfect sense to let that shine through in your promotions as well. And if you're still thinking "ick, no, I don't want to promote my books," that's okay.

You don't have to.

However, if part of you has occasionally thought "even though my work would touch more people if I could do some kind of promotion, it's just so HARD" -- here's a way around that.

Today's Prize

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If you answer the question below and random-dot-org draws the virtual slip of paper with your name, you'll get some extra help with a free class on Promotion For Your Personality next month. (And if you win after signing up at https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/PersPromo/info, you'll get a refund instead.)

This question is easy, because it won't involve any boasting about yourself and/or your books. Instead, share a few sentences about someone you admire.

What is it you admire about them?

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It's always uplifting to read such things. And keep in mind as you write yours that somewhere, someday, someone could be answering that very same question about YOU.

So, even though you won't be sharing their answer just yet, have fun thinking of what they might say!

Laurie, betting you won't be surprised at how much easier it is to talk about other people's good qualities than about our own


Laurie Schnebly Campbell was thrilled when Missy invited her to discuss promotion with Seekerville writers, because people who appreciate the value of humility often find it difficult to share their work...even knowing it'll touch people's hearts. With a day job in advertising and a master's in counseling, she'll be guiding writers who want "Promotion to Suit Your Personality" from June 13–24 in the email class offered as today's prize.

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134 comments:

Missy Tippens said...

Welcome, Laurie! The decaff coffee is on for us night owls. :)

Donna Hatch said...

I admire my mother because she is unselfish, kind, and never acts as if she knows it all. She has always been genuine and possesses quiet strength. I try to be like her.

Missy Tippens said...

How wonderful, Donna! What a blessing.

Tina Radcliffe said...

Welcome back, Laurie. I admire so many people here is Seekerville it would be impossible to choose just one person. But you certainly have given me lots to think about.

I was talking to someone just yesterday about promoting. We were of like minds. I won't brag about my work, but I certainly am willing to pay someone like Bookbub to do it for me. LOL.

That's the introvert talking :)

Tina Radcliffe said...

By the way...I took a trip to Sedona, Arizona for the second time since I moved here ...and I heard a rumor that you are related to the lady that Sedona is named after.

True???

Kathleen Rice Adams said...

Um... I admit to committing an "if you only read one [sub-genre of romance] this year, it should be this one" foul this weekend, and I'm still embarrassed. An author I admire the living daylights out of said that that very thing about one of my books, without prompting. Needless to say, I was thrilled. Once I got over the disbelief, I created a graphic containing the book cover and her quote, but sharing the graphic hurt. I can suggest readers pick up a copy of books I enjoy, but promoting my own is like cutting a vein.

The people I admire would compose a list longer than my arm, but among them are authors who have every reason to crow, yet remain humble and down-to-earth; folks who render aid to the suffering and never say a word about their good deeds; those who remain steadfast in the face of adversity; people who are genuine, not some self-made paragon.

Perhaps the best promotion is not hawking our books but simply being human, flawed like everyone else but genuine and humane.

Jackie said...

Hi Laurie, welcome to Seekerville!

What great advice. I know there are certain promotions I'm more comfortable with as I watch authors 'advertise' their books.

Thanks for sharing today!

Jill Weatherholt said...

Welcome, Laurie! Thank you for the terrific advice. Writers who jam my Twitter feed with ads for their books generally get an eyeball roll and a block.
Thanks for inviting Laurie, Missy!

Glynna Kaye said...

Welcome, LAURIE! Thank you for sharing your promotion experience and the conclusion that "one size DOESN'T fit all." So many factors weigh in -- personality, budget, available time, and opportunities that present themselves (or not), and an awareness that seasons in our life change. What we might not be able to do today promotion wise, we may be able to do tomorrow--and vice versa.

I've had the opportunity to attend your workshops at the Desert Dreams Writers Conference in the past (and have your book on "Believable Characters"), so it's especially delightful to have you here today. I think, too, I may have met you at a book signing at the "Well Red Coyote--Books on the Rocks" in Sedona years ago.

Missy Tippens said...

Tina, I love that quote about paying Book Bub do it. :)

I think it's definitely tough for introverts.

Missy Tippens said...

Kathleen, I think being open and honest about who we are (human, as you said) is a great way to reach out to others. I think readers like a peek into author's lives.

Missy Tippens said...

Good morning, Jackie. Glad you stopped by.

Missy Tippens said...

Jill, I agree on the blocked Twitter feed. :)

Meghan M. Gorecki said...

WOW was this timely for me as I relaunch my indie-pubbed book for its 2 year "birthday." On somewhat of a whim at that. Already despite my joy of the Lord totally being my strength I've already fallen into the comparison trap and getting overwhelmed with the marketing--especially because I *don't* want to market un-authentically or with no warmth like I've seen a few others in my acquaitance do. The ones though I do admire in more ways than their books/marketing? In a total God-moment like way--they are ones I can go to at any time to pick their brain, ask for prayer and get honest feedback from. And I am so, so grateful.

Missy Tippens said...

Glynna, I've loved Laurie's classes! My favorite so far was Plot Via Motivation. Love that one!

Carol said...
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Carol said...

Great article, Laurie! I hate trying to "sell" myself for my books, especially mass marketing. I'm better at one-on-one but that's tough to do. I'm all about the characters so maybe my approach should be "let me tell you about..."

Thanks for giving me something to think about!

Missy Tippens said...

Meghan, it's easy to get overwhelmed, isn't it? I seem to always feel as if I'm not doing enough. I think I'm still looking for my perfect way to do promotion.

Hope your relaunch goes well!

Missy Tippens said...

Good morning, Carol. Thanks for stopping by!

Ruth Logan Herne said...

Laurie, I love this! Thanks for being here today, and I want to say I'm in total agreement with what you're saying.

I think it's clutch to be ourselves, although possibly a better version of ourselves than our families see daily, LOL!

Readers can spot a con job fairly quickly, and who wants to pretend to be something they're not? I think learning what works for us, (and I'm still a big proponent of write, write, write, the more you're writing the less time you have to mess yourself up!) because your books are a direct reflection of "you"... and those books can be the arrow that points to how your promo efforts should go.

This is wonderful!

I made homemade frosted sugar cookies yesterday, with PINK frosting for Mother's Day, so I'm setting a platter of them on the shelf next to the entry forms for Laurie's giveaway!!!

:) (there are no entry forms, guys, come on... all you have to do is comment!!)

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I'm about to disagree with Missy and Tina, but in the nicest possible way because there are a lot of very successful introverted authors...

Two words:

Dee Henderson.

I don't think Dee has to do a lot of promo, because she just keeps writing books.

The more you write... the more chances you have to gather more readers.

When I did that post last month, about 95% of folks declared themselves as introverts. I think that probably goes for lots of authors...

But the more you write and produce, the less you have to worry about promo because the books are doing it for you.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Laurie who is one of my favorite people in the writing world. Well in the whole world. smile. Folks, Laurie is a wonderful friend. She has been in charge of the mentoring program at Desert Rose RWA for years. And she herself mentors many of us.

Its so wonderful to have you here today, Laurie and especially talking about a topic I have been stewing over lately. I'm so much the person who knows you need to advertise, but haven't found my voice or way yet. I think I'm going to sign up for your class. smile

Have fun today my fellow Arizonan.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Yes, Tina Laurie is related to Sedona. I think Sedona was her grandmother, but she'll tell you all about it.

I was in Sedona on Saturday driving through with friends to Flagstaff. Did we pass each other?

Sandra Leesmith said...

JUst so you know. Bookbub is one of the best places to advertise, but it is very difficult to get in. They generally take authors who are already popular. They want you to have a huge media presence already before they will advertise. And you have to give away free books with them to start with. However, it does get your name out there.

Stephanie said...

Hi, Laurie. What a great blog. I'm such a failure at marketing. Like you said, it's hard to brag on your own books. One person I'd like to brag on is one of my CBC RWA chaptermates, Amberly Smith. Amberly is one of the most upbeat and kind people I've ever met even though she has had scary health problems. She's so giving of her time and knowledge and she's a special friend.

Gina Conkle said...

Hi Laurie,

You dove into a tough topic and gave a great, balanced view. It really comes down to connecting with readers one person at a time.

Missy Tippens said...

Quote of the day from Ruthy: I think it's clutch to be ourselves, although possibly a better version of ourselves than our families see daily, LOL!

I love it! :)

Missy Tippens said...

And other quote of the day from Ruthy, which I totally agree with: But the more you write and produce, the less you have to worry about promo because the books are doing it for you.

Amen. I've seen that happen with some of the big sellers.

Marianne Barkman said...

Wow! I've been coming to Arizona for 19 winters and never even knew that Sedona was named for a person! Now I'll have to read about that! Dee Henderson hasn't even been as prolific a writer as, say Nora Roberts but her books sell.
Thanks for the post. It's interesting to read your thoughts on promoting yourselves.

Marguerite Hall said...

Excellent post and very thought provoking. I always find it difficult to determine the difference between promoting and spamming. I know I've unsubscribed from many groups and email lists due to excessive promotions. I know several people have found success by creating "street teams" that help spread the word. By creating a group and providing them with a few freebies, you can cut the workload when it comes to promotion

As for the person I admire, like a few others I admire my mother most. She is an eternal optimist and never fails to find the bright side to any situation, something I'm still trying to learn.

Myra Johnson said...

Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us, Laurie! It's so true--we're all different in what we're comfortable with, and I like your idea about figuring out our "sharing type."

Yes, it would be great to be so widely known for writing great books that promo becomes irrelevant, but I'm not there yet, so I need all the help I can get!

MsHellion said...

I'm not at a promotion stage yet by any means, but yes, the thought of it does break me out in hives. I'm apt to say I write funny books, but at the same time, I know funny is a subjective thing...so while I find my books funny, not everyone would.

Someone I admire.

You know, I really admire the Obamas. I think they're both classy, down-to-earth, loving spouses and loving parents, funny, thoughtful, kind, and spiritual. It's boggling to me that they're the First couple in that position in which one or the other wasn't a huge scandal in the making. No affairs, no cover-ups, nothing where you spent your time apologizing to friends from other countries who say, "Really? You elected that guy?"

rozdennyfox said...

Laurie, you always have such great blogs. And promotion, at least for me, is most difficult. It's probably good to have a newsletter, but I haven't done one of those since the days we mailed them to readers. What's effective changes so quickly it's really hard to keep up. I agree with so many of the comments that have said it's still hard to know what avenues are best.

Heidi said...

I don't know of anyone who really "likes" self-promotion -- even extroverts like me! I'm really great at talking up everyone else's books, not so much my own. However, I've been a part of a number of nonprofits over the years and learned to be better about this. I try to think of Author Heidi Hormel as not "me" but someone I'm trying to help get readers and notice -- I know it sounds a little weird but these mental gymnastics help!

Because I'm an extrovert and an amateur thespian, I have loved the opportunities to do book talks and appear on our local TV station :-)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MISSY, who put on the decaf late last night...
Wow, I wish I'd stayed up until midnight -- thanks for being such a welcoming hostess!

.
FOR DONNA, who admires her mother because...
she is unselfish, kind, and never acts as if she knows it all. She has always been genuine and possesses quiet strength.

That's SO impressive! And I see those traits in you, for sure; the way you've never been egotistical about your publishing success and found all the great things about moving up north.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR TINA, who found a good technique for introverts...
I won't brag about my work, but I certainly am willing to pay someone like Bookbub to do it for me.

Gotta love what works. :)

And you're right in thinking I'm related to the lady Sedona is named for -- Sedona Schnebly was my grandpa's mom. She was "the plain sister" whose beautiful sister Lily married the golden boy of their Missouri hometown, while Sedona was disowned for marrying the hardware store clerk. Their "mixed marriage" was so scandalous (she was Presbyterian and he was Methodist) that they had to leave town...but Lily's husband wound up doing time at Leavenworth for embezzlement, while Sedona's founded a town that immortalized her name. Happy ending!

Missy Tippens said...

Sandra, that's so cool that you are chapter mates!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR KATHLEEN, who suggested that perhaps the best promotion is...

not hawking our books but simply being human, flawed like everyone else but genuine and humane.

I love the blend of genuine and humane -- seems like that covers every possible base! Because genuine isn't always enough (some people are genuinely self-centered) and being humane to win brownie points isn't enough (because it's done selfishly, even though the hungry STILL do get fed). Put 'em together, though, and it leads to exactly the kind of people you admire:

authors who have every reason to crow, yet remain humble and down-to-earth; folks who render aid to the suffering and never say a word about their good deeds; those who remain steadfast in the face of adversity; people who are genuine, not some self-made paragon.

Love it!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR JACKIE, who knows there are certain promotions she's...

more comfortable with as I watch authors 'advertise' their books.

That's a great way of spotting what works for you; envisioning yourself trying various techniques you've seen. Sometimes the right choices just pop right out as "YES, that's for me." :)

.
FOR JILL, who's found a way to reduce annoying promotions...

Writers who jam my Twitter feed with ads for their books generally get an eyeball roll and a block.

Gee, now you've actually got me thinking I could stand to go back to Twitter -- thanks for a good tip!

Tina Radcliffe said...

Oh, wow. I love that story. What wonderful writing fodder.

Oh, those mixed marriages. I come from parents who were scandalous. An Italian girl marrying a Polish boy in the fifties. Egads.

Tina Radcliffe said...


"Writers who jam my Twitter feed with ads for their books generally get an eyeball roll and a block."

Oh my gosh. Is this true or what? Over and over and over and over. And it goes to my phone. Over and and over and over.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR GLYNNA, who remembers meeting at Desert Dreams and

a book signing at the "Well Red Coyote--Books on the Rocks" in Sedona years ago.

Wasn't that fun? Seeing your photo took me straight back there; I remember being impressed with you even back then! And I like your mention of

opportunities that present themselves (or not), and an awareness that seasons in our life change. What we might not be able to do today promotion wise, we may be able to do tomorrow--and vice versa.

Gotta love changing seasons, for sure. :)

Nancy K said...

Another fabulous Laurie blog! I'm not wonderful at keeping my name out there, even in a passive way. I'm not on every social media site, and tend to "favor" FB over the others just because I'm more familiar with it. I'd rather write than face another social media learning curve. However, this blog and the comments have me rethinking - yet again! - what I can and am willing to do to promo my books.

Thanks, Laurie!

Light,
Nancy

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MEGHAN, who admires the people...

I can go to at any time to pick their brain, ask for prayer and get honest feedback from. And I am so, so grateful.

Isn't that a wonderful gift? And all the more precious during a time like what you're going through right now, falling into the morass of second-anniversary marketing, which makes it all too easy to fall into

the comparison trap and being overwhelmed:

Even though we know better, it DOES sometimes feel like a constant battle. So knowing people like those you admire is a tremendous asset to have on hand...and, like you've done, to RECOGNIZE. Thanks for inspiring me to do that, too!

Patricia said...

Someone I admire very much is my sister Kathy because her go-to answer when I talk to her is to be understanding and uplifting and non-judgmental. She may not agree with me, but she doesn't argue, she's accepting of people's difference, and she's kind.

Laurie Schnebly said...

MORE COMING...

I'm loving all these comments -- Seekerville visitors write such great posts!

And, wouldn't you know, I have to get dressed and go to work at my day job...which I'm hoping will be very slow today so I can come back and enjoy more before lunch time.

Laurie, enjoying scanning all the names of people who've already visited because I know I'm going to love the read :)

Julie Lessman said...

Oh, LAURIE, are you speaking my language or what???!!

WELCOME TO SEEKERVILLE, and MEGA THANKS to Missy for bringing you here!

Like most authors, I DESPISE promotion and have actually stopped self-promotion for several months now, only promoting other authors, but I can see a decline in my own sales because of it, so your post is timely for me. The only promo I like doing is creating memes with quotes from my books or review quotes or excerpts and posting them on FB. But you can only do that so many times before it becomes a burnout for you and the reader.

YOU SAID: Share a few sentences about someone you admire. What is it you admire about them?

Well, the first person who comes to mind -- and to many peoples' minds, I'm sure -- is Ruth Logan Herne. I admire her because even though she was one of the last out the gate as far as Seekers getting published, she shot out like a drag-strip burnout, leaving everybody in a cloud of smoke with 43 novels/novellas in the time it took me to put out 16. And she did all this while working a full-time daycare, breeding/selling dogs, renovating her house, baking nonstop while still being a stellar mom to eight kids (?) and only God knows how many grandkids. My agent (who is also her agent) calls her the Energizer Bunny, and I would have to agree. :) She's amazing, but I realize now NOT the norm, so I stopped comparing myself to her a while back, which has helped my confidence A LOT! ;)

Hugs,
Julie

Missy Tippens said...

Stephanie, thanks for telling us about your friend Amberly!

Missy Tippens said...

Gina, thanks for dropping by!

Marianne, I'm interested in her ancestor story too!

Missy Tippens said...

I love how people are mentioning their mothers! Marguerite, thanks for sharing about yours!

Missy Tippens said...

MsHellion, I have to agree with you on breaking out in hives! I get anxious every time I post something to my FB author page because I know it's going to go automatically to Twitter (which makes me more nervous than FB). :) I fret over bugging people. Which, when I think about it, is kind of crazy. As long as I'm not overdoing it, I think people like to hear about books. I know I do when people tell me about theirs.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Great tip Heidi, I love the mental gymnastics of thinking of Heidi as someone else. I might try that.

Missy Tippens said...

Roz, I've mailed very few newsletters. I've found email newsletters so much easier once I got the hang of the sign-up forms.

Missy Tippens said...

Heidi, that's so interesting about extroverts feeling the same way. I love how you've addressed it, almost as your own promotion director. :) Love it!

Sandra Leesmith said...

Amen Julie Ruthy is amazing.

However, can't compare ourselves to others. In our productivity nor on the best seller list.

As Laurie said, we all have our own gifts.

smiling

Missy Tippens said...

Laurie, what a wonderful story about your great-grandmother!

Sandra Leesmith said...

Roz, I really love your author blogs on your Harlequin Heartwarming blog site. So fun and a great way to get to know all of you authors.

Haven't been there in awhile so this reminds me to hop back on. smile

Missy Tippens said...

Nancy K and Patricia, thanks for stopping by! And Patricia, thanks for telling us about your sister. Sisters are wonderful!

Michael Mock said...

So you're saying we shouldn't hide our writing under a bushel? 'Cause that was sort of my plan...

I'm currently feeling extremely grateful for/to my sister-in-law. We just had a Big Family Event this past weekend, with lots of friends and family and friends who might as well be family coming into town. SiL made it her job to get in touch with everybody, find out their travel plans, and coordinate things so that everybody had transportation and a place to stay. She also made a list of cell phone numbers and made sure that anybody who needed it had a copy. So I admire her intelligence and organization, because that was a lot to keep track of and her efforts made something that could have been a chaotic and disorganized weekend much easier for everyone. Mainly, though, I admire her foresight in anticipating the need for that kind of organization.

rozdennyfox said...

Missy, I used to pay my grandtwins to fold and send out my newsletter. That seemed so easy. But I really need to look into the e-version.

rozdennyfox said...

SandraLeeSmith, If you get to the Heartwarming BlogSpot, be sure to check out Melinda Curtis's last blog. It's so timely about something that happened to her with a bad caregiver for her father. A teaching tool for sure. Hope all is well in your corner. Thanks to Laurie for letting us get together here.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR CAROL, who mentioned being...

better at one-on-one but that's tough to do.

That's a great insight into your own personality, which shouldn't surprise me because you've HAD all my classes that deal with personality types! (Not that those are the only way to identify traits; they're just the ones I find easiest to use.)

So absolutely, going with that knowledge as a starting point will make it a lot easier to handle the marketing for your soon-to-come book...I can't wait to see the publicity AND the book in print!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR RUTH, who brought pink sugar cookies and a good insight...

the more you write and produce, the less you have to worry about promo because the books are doing it for you.

This sounds like a writer's idea of heaven, and isn't it wonderful? :)

Not being an especially fast writer myself, I admit to feeling envious of people who can do two books a year (sometimes even more) and keep producing consistently great work. Or even those few who do just one a year but have built up an enormous fan base, due in part to fabulous promotion from their publishers.

Gotta keep reminding myself they're the lucky minority, or I'd start to feel VERY self-pitying...sigh.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR SANDRA, my fellow Arizonan...

Oh, I envy you getting up to Sedona for Mother's Day weekend -- what a treat!

And how cool that I'll get to see you in class next month; I can guarantee you'll come away from there with all kinds of new insights on the best way to build your individual brand. I know you've worked in various genres over the years, and that's a strength we can start building on right from the start.

But, okay, I'll wait on that until June 13. :)

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I am laughing out loud, and will contend that my frenetic inner drive might seem disconcerting....

BUT....

1K/day.

One thousand words/day.

Even 500 words/day will get you a book in 3-4 months.

2-3 books/year.

And I will confess that I would probably rather write than do anything except grow things in the dirt and play with little kids.

I do love little kids and getting dirty, but after that, I love writing!!!!!

But Julie made a very good point, we can't do comparisons, except to show ourselves techniques that might work for us.

So if the 1K/day doesn't work for you, and you cut that in half, that might be perfect.

Or if you need to change up writing habits, go from morning to afternoon, etc.... that might help....

The promo thing seems so hit and miss these days, but that comes back to Laurie's wisdom: to find what feels right to you.

So for me, talking with people (speaking, radio interviews, facebook) works well because I rarely shut up.

It's an illness, I'm sure.

But if you're not a talker, then maybe developing a personal blog with a people-building message would be better?

Or loving the world on Instagram (I have self-limited myself to fb and twitter right now, because the writing goal always comes first.... If I mess that up, I mess up a lot of stuff!)

Finding our niche. Huge.

Barbara Fox said...

Laurie
Thank you for your post about promoting according to your personality type. What a relief! here are some kinds of promotion that I detest and would do almost anything to avoid. Nice to know it's okay.

I admire my daughter. She's a better daughter than I was. Plus she's smart, funny, exceptionally creative, and a superb photographer. Oh and brave. When she was 19 years old she went to England to attend a year long working student program in horsemanship without knowing a soul. She's really an amazing person.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR STEPHANIE, with thanks for sharing the story of someone you admire:

one of the most upbeat and kind people I've ever met even though she has had scary health problems. She's so giving of her time and knowledge

Isn't it a treat to know people like that? She's got that personable touch which you do, as well, and I'm betting you already know what a difference that can make in any successful marketing campaign. (Yes, including yours for Radio Rose!)

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I remember the Sedona story from the last time we chatted, and I waved to Sedona on my way to the Grand Canyon two weeks ago... such gorgeous, one-of-a-kind country!!!

I love that story, Laurie!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR GINA, who mentioned connecting with readers one person at a time...

You know, this can be a terrific way of doing promo. There are sure writers out there for whom this is a natural personality fit, and they can do really well taking this approach.

There are others for whom a more global approach works better, and that's equally effective -- it truly all comes down to what works for the kind of person you are!

DebH said...

hi Laurie
thanks for the post on self-promotion. my boss says I'm terrible at it. every year when we have to do year end evals for the company - he has to add/revise what I write because I (his words)"sell myself short". I probably wouldn't be too good at the self promo with my own writing. I definitely enjoy promoting others writing though. Go figure.
I got slapped down a lot when I was a kid for "bragging" because it I wasn't being humble. Not by my mom or family, but by church people and school teachers and well, other kids. I think that's where my wariness comes from.

As for person(s) I admire... ALL the Seekers because of their generosity of time, prayers, support, prayers, unconditional love they exude through Seekerville and again, prayers. I wouldn't be half the writer I am without the uplifting ministry they have provided.

Of course I admire my mom too. The older I get, the smarter/wiser she is/was. Amazing how that happens.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MARIANNE, who's been coming to Arizona for 19 winters...

and never even knew that Sedona was named for a person! Now I'll have to read about that!

It's sure an entertaining story. A lot of the bios cover all her biographical details, but tend not to mention that as a child she was called "that little bug-eyed Donie Miller" and that as an adult she was a diehard tee-totaler who, whenever the minister came to visit, would tell her kids to go down to the cellar and get him "some drink," which was clearly not the same thing as "a drink."

"Drink" was what she made with local fruits, in a barrel downstairs...apparently without ever knowing about the magic of fermentation. And the minister never enlightened her. :)

Missy Tippens said...

Michael, your sister-in-law sounds amazing! What a great gift to your family and friends.

Missy Tippens said...

Barbara Fox, thanks for sharing about your daughter! She does sound brave.

Missy Tippens said...

DebH, I'm so sorry you got smacked down for your young exuberance. I hope you find that again! Definitely don't sell yourself short. Listen to your boss! :)

Missy Tippens said...

I'm going to be away from the computer for a while. I'll fill y'all in later! Keep having fun with Laurie and I'll catch up later. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MARGUERITE, who has good reason to admire of her mother...

an eternal optimist and never fails to find the bright side to any situation, something I'm still trying to learn.

Optimism is a character strength, all right, with that classic making-lemonade-from-lemons approach -- that IS admirable!

Looking ahead to potential problems isn't always a negative thing, though, because there are times when that can make a difference. If something falls apart at the last minute, someone who's anticipated problems can usually fix it more quickly than someone who never expected trouble.

And of course, being able to see the bright side at the same time is frosting on the cake. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MYRA, who came up with a great description of a writer's dream...

Yes, it would be great to be so widely known for writing great books that promo becomes irrelevant, but I'm not there yet, so I need all the help I can get!

I suspect that's true for most of us, drat it. Although there IS always the approach of figuring "God will point the people who need my work in the right direction with no effort on my part," which reminds me of that classic joke about the guy who keeps praying to win the lottery until finally hearing the reminder, "you gotta buy a ticket."

Promotion is our way of buying a ticket. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR FRAN, who breaks out in hives at the thought of promotion AND admires a couple who's...

classy, down-to-earth, loving spouses and loving parents, funny, thoughtful, kind, and spiritual

That's a lovely tribute to the Obamas, and one I'll bet every family would like to see applied to themselves as well...no matter what their political party. :)

As for breaking out in hives, don't worry -- once you're ready to start promotion, you'll be amazed at how easy it can be with the right techniques!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR ROZ, who mentioned newsletters...

I haven't done one of those since the days we mailed them to readers. What's effective changes so quickly it's really hard to keep up. I agree with so many of the comments that have said it's still hard to know what avenues are best.

Part of what makes it hard is that there are so MANY venues to choose from! I miss the days when the only choices were to mail newsletters or place ads in magazines or newspapers that reached prospective readers...seems like things were a lot easier then.

Seeing something like 150 ideas for promotion bowled me over...it's clear a lot of people have given this a LOT of thought.

Debby Giusti said...

Laurie, thanks for being with us today!

I admire folks who promote their work seemingly without effort or angst.

Unfortunately, I am not a salesperson. I'd rather give a book away than ask someone to buy a copy. That's not good for a writer! :)

Ruthy's wagging her finger at me. :)

But I do love to mix and mingle with readers, and make new friends at events. If they get to know me, maybe they'll pick up one of my books. If they don't, that's okay too.

Perhaps I should follow Tina's advice and hire a PR person. LOL!

Debby Giusti said...

Sedona sounds delightful! Write her story, please! We all want more info. A hubby at Leavenworth. Oh my goodness. My son and dil lived in the town of Leavenworth.

The prison is ominous...and I just saw it from the outside, driving by!

Yes, Sedona's story needs to be told!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR HEIDI, who offered a great tip for introverts AND extroverts...

I try to think of Author Heidi Hormel as not "me" but someone I'm trying to help get readers and notice

Taking "yourself" out of the equation can sure make it easier to talk up a "product you like" instead! After all, we don't hesitate to post rave reviews for authors whose books we love, even if the author is someone we know personally. (Well, unless Amazon is on one of its cleanup phases.)

So taking that attitude toward self-promotion can be a handy exercise...which your "mental gymnastics" phrase describes beautifully. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR NANCY, who mentioned tending

...to "favor" FB over the others just because I'm more familiar with it

Isn't that the truth? We all tend to gravitate toward the areas that feel comfortable, and familiarity is usually a tremendous comfort factor.

Often that's valid -- there's nothing wrong with trying different types of social media and returning to the one which feels most satisfactory. The only down-side is if we never look at other types after having chosen one, which I admit I'm guilty of when it comes to using Mac instead of Windows. Windows probably has all kinds of wonderful features I'll never know about, because I've gotten so comfortable with Mac!

Pam Hillman said...

As someone else mentioned, I admire people who seem to effortlessly promote their work. And, generally, I've found that those same people tend to share others books in a generous and genuine way as well.

Ruth Logan Herne said...

I am just thrilled that you don't have a newsletter.

THRILLED, I TELL YOU.

I keep trying....

And failing.

I kind of hate myself every time I try and develop the list, and the time, and the whole thing!

I'm so glad I'm not alone, Laurie!!!!!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR PATRICIA, who has very good reasons for admiring her sister...

her go-to answer when I talk to her is to be understanding and uplifting and non-judgmental. She may not agree with me, but she doesn't argue, she's accepting of people's difference, and she's kind.

Talk about a wonderful tribute to a wonderful sister -- it's hard to beat that kind of unconditional love. And it sounds like she doesn't feel any need to "correct" you because you likely share some common bedrock values...you both know, way deep down, what the other one is made of. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR JULIE, who's been actively looking at the good/bad side of promo:

actually stopped self-promotion for several months now, only promoting other authors, but I can see a decline in my own sales because of it

Giving it a rest was a very smart idea! After all, how else would you know whether promotion really is effective? So now that you've made that discovery, good for you on looking at options including what you've already tried...

creating memes with quotes from my books or review quotes or excerpts and posting them on FB. But you can only do that so many times before it becomes a burnout for you and the reader.

You're in a perfect place for exploring new possibilities -- which, yes, are covered in my class but there are also a lot of great ideas popping up right here in today's comments!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MICHAEL, whose tribute to an admired sister-in-law is impressive...

a lot to keep track of and her efforts made something that could have been a chaotic and disorganized weekend much easier for everyone. Mainly, though, I admire her foresight in anticipating the need for that kind of organization.

Great organization and foresight are fabulous gifts, and ones that tend to be less common among "creative" types like, ahem, writers. (Yes, I totally appreciate your kinda planning to hide your writing under a bushel!)

Some of us are as incapable of good organization as we are of running a four-minute mile -- no amount of effort is going to change that. Others are perfectly capable but haven't felt much need to use that skill. So the trick is determining which you are: someone who'd like to develop a new skill, or someone who'd rather barter for it by using the skills you've already developed. Hmm...

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR BARBARA, who makes me wish I had a comparable daughter...

she's smart, funny, exceptionally creative, and a superb photographer. Oh and brave. When she was 19 years old she went to England to attend a year long working student program in horsemanship without knowing a soul.

Wow, you sure did a great job raising her! And of course part of her personality is nature rather than nurture, but even so you had a lot to do with the way she developed into such an amazing person. :)

Which ALL of us with great kids, whether sons or daughters, can be VERY proud of!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR DEBBY, who'd rather give a book away than ask someone to buy a copy...

Okay, maybe that isn't good for a writer FINANCIALLY, but there's a lot to be said for it EMOTIONALLY. There's nothing wrong with sharing your books by giving them away, unless it means you're taking food away from your children, but writers who aren't depending on sales to feed their family do have more freedom. :)

And sometimes sharing a freebie convinces the recipient "this is so good, I want more of the same!" -- which, yep, is a useful marketing strategy. If you ARE using it as such, then it makes sense to look at how well it's working for you. But, again, if it's an expression of joy in sharing rather than (or along with) a marketing tool, it's an absolutely lovely expression.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR DEB H, whose boss said she sells herself short...

I probably wouldn't be too good at the self promo with my own writing. I definitely enjoy promoting others writing though. Go figure.
I got slapped down a lot when I was a kid for "bragging" -- I think that's where my wariness comes from.

Isn't it amazing how much easier it is to "brag" about other people? Not fair, maybe, but definitely easier! And just looking at your comment about why you admire all the Seekers, it's clear you're good at finding the best in others...which, hmm, is definitely a clue to your personality when it comes to the most effective type of promotion. :)

Chill N said...

Most of the authors I know tend toward intovert but we don't have any trouble at all recommending and promoting (through word of mouth) the work of authors we enjoy reading. I gotta think about that ...

Also need to think more about your post, Laurie. Narrowing down what promotion I would be comfortable with will likely produce a very short list. Very :-)

Thanks for your post!

Nancy C

Sandra Leesmith said...

Hi Roz Thanks for the heads up about Harlequins's new Western Romances. And yes, the spotlight features quite a few Arizona authors. Here is the link spotlight on Western Romance

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR PAM, who admires people who seem to effortlessly promote their work...

And, generally, I've found that those same people tend to share others books in a generous and genuine way as well.

Some people -- and don't the rest of us envy them?! -- are instinctive promoters. They obviously don't go around promoting things they don't believe in, because that would be plain old hucksterism, but they find it easy and natural to share the word about whatever excites them...whether it's their own book or a book by someone else.

That's the seventh personality type, and it'd sure be convenient if every writer had that one! Although, shoot, then the world would be a FAR less interesting place because we'd all be good at the same things and bad at the same things. Ulp. Never mind.

Sandra Leesmith said...

Laurie Thanks again for joining us during your busy day. Must be lunch hour, smile. No need to respond. Just know we appreciate all of your input.

Thanks and have fun.

rozdennyfox said...

Laurie, Just asking if this is a subject you're going to explore further in a workshop at National this year?

Sandra Leesmith said...

Roz Are you going to Nationals? I will be there. Oooooh if Laurie is there also, won't that be fun.

Janet Dean said...

LAURIE, welcome back to Seekerville. Your idea to match personality with promotion styles is terrific! Thanks for offering to give an online class.

I write for Love Inspired and the short shelf life makes me feel pressured to get the word out. I'm outgoing and don't mind talking about my books, but I don't feel comfortable asking anyone to buy them. I rely on the listener's reaction to know whether she's interested. If she asks questions where to get the books, I pull out a bookmark to help her remember the title, find my website or my other books on Amazon. I often mention that my books are in the public library or the opening of my books can be read on Amazon, if she'd like to check out my writing before investing their money.

Janet

Laurel Greer said...

Hi Laurie,

Given the workload of promotion seems overwhelming it is encouraging to read there are ways to tailor it to be more effective.

I have been admiring my six-year-old daughter this weekend. She's been dealing with having her little sister in the hospital for dehydration, and has managed to stay her loving, cooperative self.

Best,
Laurel Greer

Janet said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Janet Ch said...

Hi Laurie,

I really admire this man; (The news story is from 2014 but I'm so impressed I'm still thinking about him)

"Stanislaw Kowalski, 104, from Swidnica, Poland, has become the oldest person in Europe to run a 100m race - smashing the record previously held by a 96-year-old."

It's incredible that he's 104 (saw a youtube video and he looks far younger) but to win a running race as well!!!! He's such an inspiration.
Janet Ch (UK)

Cara Lynn James said...

Welcome to Seekerville, Laurie! Thanks for the really helpful tips! Self promotion doesn't come naturally for all writers so this info is great.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR JANET D, who waits to see if someone seems interested and then...

I often mention that my books are in the public library or the opening of my books can be read on Amazon, if she'd like to check out my writing before investing their money.

What a great way of relieving any sense of "buy my book" pressure! The listener knows you care more about them having a good experience than about making a sale, and if that happens to make 'em think better of you ("hmm, a person who cares about me must write the kind of books I like to read") it's a nice bonus for you both. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR LAUREL, who has a new reason to admire her six-year-old daughter...

She's been dealing with having her little sister in the hospital for dehydration, and has managed to stay her loving, cooperative self.

How nice for you both! Talk about a great attitude for getting through a tough time -- she's making things easier on you for not having to worry about her, AND her sister who'll get more focused attention, AND herself for not letting her entire world get shaken up due to a temporary downturn.

All that said, I'll add you all to my prayer list right now...it'll be great putting this entire episode behind you!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR JANET C, who found an amazing source of inspiration...

Stanislaw Kowalski, 104, from Swidnica, Poland, has become the oldest person in Europe to run a 100m race - smashing the record previously held by a 96-year-old.

That's staggering. I'd be impressed if he were winning a 100m race at age 52, but 104 is even MORE impressive. And I like your thinking out of the box, because inspiration can come from strangers as well as from people we know. He sure sounds like a great role model for guts and determination. :)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR CARA, who pointed out a pretty big truth...

Self promotion doesn't come naturally for all writers

Don't you wonder if there's any kind of connection between people who like to write and people who don't like to promote themselves? There are always exceptions, but it seems like writers tend to be more comfortable telling OTHER people's stories -- making anyone other than themselves the star of the show (or in our case, the book).

Which is why we need tricks for promotion the same as we need 'em for anything else that doesn't come instinctively...like, for instance, eating a perfectly balanced diet without ever thinking about it. (Boy, don't I WISH that came easily!)

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR NANCY, who's already started thinking about styles...

Narrowing down what promotion I would be comfortable with will likely produce a very short list. Very :-)

That's okay. :) Finding something you're comfortable with is a VERY good way to start, because it introduces you to more readers who'll (at least some of them) discover they love your books.

Nothing says you ever have to move beyond that. But if you want to, there are all kinds of techniques that work for all kinds of people...some of which most of us have ever even thought of trying. Bet you won't be surprised to hear that's what we'll go over in the class, right?

rozdennyfox said...

SandraLee---yes I'm going. If you are, we must find time to get together.

Janet Dean said...

LAURIE, you're know how to encourage me! Guessing your personality test makes that very evident.

Thanks!
Janet

CMalone said...

Hi Laurie,

In answer to your question, I choose you. I had such a lovely time with you last August in the retreat in Monrovia, CA. You are a kind, gracious person and a fabulous teacher. I want to be you if and when I ever grow up. Thank you.

I'm taking a workshop right now about branding and marketing followed by launching a book campaign. All things I never thought I'd have to be involved in as an author. Don't we just write our books and let the paid people market? Guess what? I ain't got not paid people--I got me. I never actually thought of marketing and promo like washing the dishes, but now that you've mention that, I can get behind it. If there are small chunks of "Sharing about my books," then people don't feel as harassed as "BUY MY BOOK--NOW!!!" I can get down with learning what type of marketer I might be and working that way instead of following someone screaming, "YOU CAN HAVE 10,000 SUBSCRIBERS NOW!!!" I'm not a screamer. I'm a INFJ (I think.) I want to help people. I want to back sour cherry pies.

Thanks again. I hope to take your workshop in June.

Carol

Missy Tippens said...

I'm back!! Goodness, lots to catch up on! :)

Where I disappeared to... we're moving and buying our first home. Had to meet the home inspector today. :)

Missy Tippens said...

Nancy C, I suspect all our lists would be short! LOL

Missy Tippens said...

Janet, those are some great ways to reach out to readers that are not a hard sell.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR CAROL, who I'm betting reflects a lot of authors with her observation...

branding and marketing followed by launching a book campaign. All things I never thought I'd have to be involved in as an author. Don't we just write our books and let the paid people market?

Boy, those sure were the good old days! I remember when I was a spring chicken in the publishing world, and Harlequin/Silhouette did EVERYTHING. And I suspect publishers still do a whole lot for their top bestselling authors, which is certainly fun to fantasize about.

Meanwhile, though, you're right in thinking it's a lot easier when broken down into small chunks. (Maybe not quite as easy as baking sour cherry pies...) And, boy, you made my day with your choice of someone you admire -- thank you!

Missy Tippens said...

Laurel, I hope your daughter is better now!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MISSY, who's in the midst of a wonderful mission...

we're moving and buying our first home.

Oh, boy, congratulations! What a fun project to be involved with -- and, sure, a headache at times, but once you've bought your first home any others will be easier because you'll have experience to fall back on. Just like writing books, huh?

Thanks so much for having me at Seekerville today...this is a great bunch of people, and I've been enjoying all the comments! Kind of regretting tonight is prayer group, but I'll check in one last time when we get home, and since this blog is on Eastern time it'll still be shortly before midnight...whew!

Missy Tippens said...

Janet CH, that's amazing about that man!

Missy Tippens said...

Laurie, thank you for hanging out with us today! I'm sorry I was gone in the middle of it.

Yes, lots of stress, but lots of excitement, too. :)

Mary Connealy said...

Sorry to be so late for the party.
Great info, Laurie.
Thanks for being on Seekerville!

Tanya Agler said...

Laurie, Thanks for the info on self-promotion. I had the privilege of taking one of your classes last year and I still pull out my binder every time I'm getting ready to start a book to review your class material.

As someone's who's not published, I'm not totally focused on self-promotion yet, but I look forward to that day.

As for your question about commenting on someone I admire. Golly, that's so difficult because it's hard to narrow that down as there are people whose stories I've read and I greatly admire them, but I'm gathering from the examples that people are talking more about people whose lives personally touch their own. So I'll go back to my school days and pick my high school English teacher because she made literature come alive. She didn't just stop teaching when the bell rang. She chaperoned a group of us students on her own time to go see Evita at the Fox Theater, and the actor who played Che Guevara came, picked her up, and twirled her around, thanking her for her impact on him. I think the teachers whose names we remember and whose classes changed us are someone I'm happy to write about.

Thanks for the information. I look forward to using it when I am published.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MARY, who was sorry to be...

late for the party.

Not to worry! The good thing about blogs is they stay up forever. :)

.
FOR TANYA, who made my night with the mention of...

I still pull out my binder every time I'm getting ready to start a book to review your class material.

How cool to hear that -- thanks for letting me know! And, boy, I envy you having a high school English teacher who took you to see Evita; what a fabulous event that must've been. Isn't it a treat, remembering people like that?

Emma Leigh Reed said...

Such an interesting piece. I always admire Laurie and the way she puts things out there. She has been a wonderful teacher (I've taken numerous of her courses). I'm in the middle of switching to a new genre for my writing, but this information I will certainly keep on hand.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR EMMA, who's in the middle of...

switching to a new genre for my writing

Oh, wow, talk about an exciting change! And you're right in thinking promotional info will come in handy no matter what the genre.

Thanks for the courses endorsement, too. :)

Missy Tippens said...

Tanya, I keep Laurie's notes to re-use too! Actually, for the Plot Via Motivation, I made myself a file that I use to fill in the blanks each time I'm working on a new story. :)

Elaine Bedigian said...

Like Missy Tippens, I keep all the class notes because they work for me long after a workshop ends. I keep shared homework from classmates as well because there are are always terrific examples, differing from my own. Your classes have been invaluable and I'll keep taking 'em because you can never learn too much of a good thing.
Your Plot via Motivation series is one of the best tools I've ever acquired.
Thanks so much!

adite said...

Hi Laurie. It's always a pleasure to read your posts. Standing out of the crowd is so very difficult in these days when everyone has something to promote. LOL. But as usual you have given me food for thought. Cheers,
Adite

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR ELAINE, who keeps class notes...

because they work for me long after a workshop ends.

That's such a great thing to do -- like re-reading a book that provided some new insights, but it's even better when you brought about those insights through your own homework.

And I love your analysis of "can never learn too much of a good thing;" that's great!

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR ADITE, who's right on target in observing...

Standing out of the crowd is so very difficult in these days when everyone has something to promote.

Isn't it, though? Getting them to even SEE your promotion in the first place, then making it stand out among all the others, are both tasks that tend to seem daunting at first.

So I'm delighted you'll be in next month's class; we'll be rolling up our sleeves for sure. :)

maggie baillie shipp said...

Late finding this great article.

We're writers, we produce a product so we are running a business. And it's not like running a shop where you open your doors, put tables and chairs out, or flower pots, try and attract a potential customer with the seductive smell of roasted coffee, or a window crammed full of funky home-ware. Our book is drowning in an ocean of books; we have no option but market. But I dread the thought. Hate the thought.

Matching it to your personality seems to make it a little less intimidating Laurie.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MAGGIE, who created vivid images of both good & bad things...

We're writers, we produce a product so we are running a business. And it's not like running a shop where you ...try and attract a potential customer with the seductive smell of roasted coffee...we have no option but market.

I'll bet everyone who enjoys wearing a marketer hat is immediately thinking "hmm, the aroma of coffee...hmm, the flavor of my book...hmm, free samples...which scene should I feature..."

But you're absolutely right in thinking that's not part of every writer's personality! Which, fortunately for all of us, is okay -- because there are so MANY different personality types that we're not all stuck doing the same kinds of marketing. Whew!

Marion said...

Hey Laurie, your article is as usual insightful and very helpful in my journey as first-time author!

I admire my husband. He's the exact opposite of me - he can cook intuitively, I need to follow a recipe. He can clean a room within 30min, I can clean a drawer in 2 hours although the room will look as before :)

He's a great provider, sticking with a job he doesn't particularly like but is good at. He's not super-quick when learning new things but he doesn't give up until he gets it. He's great at time-management. Me, not so much!

He's pretty awesome, even after 25 years together! And I hope he won't read this or he won't fit through the door :D

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR MARION, who admires her husband for enviable reasons...

he can cook intuitively...clean a room within 30min...a great provider...doesn't give up until he gets it...great at time-management

You're lucky none of us has his address handy, because otherwise he'd be SWAMPED with invitations to inspire other husbands!

And even though he doesn't necessarily sound like the kind of guy who'd go around posting "why I admire my wife" on blogs, I'll bet he'd list all the things that make you opposites -- you bring to his life the exact same contrast / compensation / balance he brings to yours. Which might explain why you're still awesome together after 25 years. :)

Deanne Patterson said...

Yes, authors have followed me just to advertise their books as well. They have even had the nerve to send me personal messages asking me to retweet things to advertise their books. An author I know and respect, like Christian book authors I don't mid doing that for but someone I've never heard of it's a no go. Mary I'd love to do a little extra shopping on Amazon, please enter me for the drawing.

Deanne P.

Laurie Schnebly said...

FOR DEANNE, whose comment hit my box a few days late...

I'm hoping it's not too late for you to click on whatever blog link has Mary giving away shopping on Amazon -- it wasn't mine, so with any luck the right one won't have closed yet.

In any case, I agree that it's annoying to be asked for retweets except when the person asking is someone you already know and respect...and probably one reason we respect such people is that they DON'T capitalize on friendship for self-promotion!