Thursday, November 17, 2016

BE AWESOME! BE A BOOK NUT!


    “Be Awesome! Be a book nut!”  
 Dr. Seuss wrote this quote decades ago but it still rings true today. 

Jewell Tweedt
Hi, I’m Jewell Tweedt and I’m excited to talk about the benefits of reading today on Seekerville. 

Here’s a little about me- I am a full-time middle school teacher with a masters in Curriculum and Instruction. I write historical fiction and contemporary mysteries and I am a Grace Awards finalist. My latest novel is Lessons Learned-Grace’s Secret set in 1870’s Nebraska. It is the fourth book in the Back to Omaha adventures series.

As a teacher I know how reading can benefit people of all ages. So if you ever feel guilty about taking time to plunk down with a good book and a cup of tea then wipe that guilt away because reading is good for you and everyone around you. So here we go with five benefits of reading and quotations by some pretty impressive people. And thanks to lifehack.org for some of these ideas.



1.    Mental stimulation. If we exercise our bodies then we should also exercise our minds. Studies show reading keeps your brain active and engaged. It’s even been suggested that reading may slow down or prevent Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Hand me a book, quick!

Best-selling author Gary Paulsen writes “I owe everything I am and everything I will be to books.” His love of reading and a lot of hard work has earned him a very successful career and multiple opportunities to influence thousands of adolescents and adults. In my school reading is a top priority and time is built into each day’s schedule for students to read what they want to read. It works. Our test scores improve yearly.

 In Lessons Learned-Grace’s Secret, Grace Freeport is Omaha’s schoolmarm. Shocked to realize most of her children have no books at home she uses her own collection to set up the town’s first public library and the response is overwhelmingly positive. “Miz Freeport, this is a fine thing you’ve done for us.”


2.       Stress reduction and tranquility. In today’s internet driven world and too-busy schedules, a good book can transport you into another realm and reduce your stress.

"Reading is the sole means by which we slip involuntarily, often helplessly into another’s voice, another’s soul.” Joyce Carol Oates. 

Sure beats taking anxiety medication. Seriously, we all need to slow down and enjoy ourselves more and reading is a safe, fun way to do that. Lester Newman, a student in my novel, knows this.  “Eyes wide with anticipation he carefully selected Treasure Island opened it to the first page and began to read.”   


3.       Reading provides knowledge. The more knowledge you have the better equipped you are to succeed in life or at least understand why things happen the way they do. History is full of enthusiastic readers who made monumental changes that impact us even today. President Thomas Jefferson’s thirst for knowledge led to him having the largest personal library in the United States in the 1800s. After he read several volumes about the frontier he made the famous Louisiana Purchase doubling the size of the United States and then sent Lewis and Clark to explore it. Jefferson wrote “I cannot live without books.”  Neither can I.

Click to Buy
 In Lessons Learned Lester Newman is looking at his teacher’s collection. “Miss Freeport, I’ve never seen so many books. That’s how come you’re so smart.”   
  
4.       Vocabulary expansion and memory improvement. Being articulate and well-spoken helps in any profession and situation. When you are reading you are developing thoughts and memories that forge new brain synapses and strengthen existing ones. And you can take those books anywhere. Stephen King writes “Books are a uniquely portable magic.”

According to a study by the Pew Research Center adults still prefer paper over e-books. Sixty-five percent of readers surveyed had read a paper or hardbound book in the past year compared to twenty-eight percent who had read an e-book. E-book sales surged in 2007 but began leveling off about three years ago. Those who do mostly use a tablet or a cell phone like my students.  



5.       Better writing skills. Readers can learn to write better. By observing the cadence, fluidity and writing styles of authors readers can hone their own skills. As a teacher, I can often tell which of my writers are readers. One of the basic rules of being a writer is to read constantly. To quote Dr. Seuss again, “Be awesome! Be a book nut!”

  To celebrate the recent release of Lessons Learned-Grace’s Secret I will be giving away an autographed copy to one lucky person who leaves a comment here on Seekerville. To see other books in the series please visit my blog at tweedtjewell.blogspot.com. I can be reached at tweedtjewell@gmail.com. My books are also available on Amazon.com.

Thank you Seekerville ladies. And to all of you, your homework today is to keep on reading!

103 comments :

  1. WELCOME to Seekerville. I don't need an excuse to read, but I'll take it. I had the shock of my life one day when a young girl who wanted to be a teacher said she didn't like reading. Teaching is reading! And I loved Joyce Carol Oates quote, and I need to print that off. Thank you for joking us here, Jewel. I would love to be entered into the drawing, please

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marianne,
      I know a couple of teachers who don't read much and I just don't get it. Reading is one of the joys of my life.

      Delete
  2. Jewell! So nice to have you back here in Seekerville!

    Reading and writing go hand-in-hand, don't they? Where would we authors be without readers? It's the simplest of great relationships!!!

    Thanks so much for your wise words. I love the book quotes, and the thought of the teacher doing that for the town is sweet beyond words.

    I brought coffee!!!!

    Let's get this day started!

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    Replies
    1. Hey Ruth,
      Coffee sounds good and a cookie or two. Will Finn share?

      Delete
  3. I'm with Marianne, I don't need an excuse to read. If I couldn't read I would be totally bored. I have loved reading since I was very very young. My mom said she read to me in the womb as she read to my sister and brother. When people tell me they don't like to read, I cringe. All those beautiful words, worlds, and messages they are missing out on. Sad.

    I loved all the quotes. Thank you for sharing.

    I pray you all have a blessed day today.

    Smiles & Blessings,
    Cindy W.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cindy,
      There is nothing better than a good book and a cup of tea. Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  4. When I was raising 6 kids and working two jobs, reading was my reward time at night... when I got A, B and C done, I'd grab my book and read a chapter or two... I'd have loved to read more, but work and kids had to come first...

    The really good side of that is that it taught me self-discipline to make the best use of my writing time each day. To stay focused and get that done first... and then get on with the day.

    I think God gives us amazing ways to prepare for the times in our life/lives, and if we use those lessons well, things get easier because we've practiced for success...

    Now I'm making cookies to go with the coffee!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Read,sing,play,move! I love to read. Thank you Jewell for sharing your inspirational words about reading. We need to keep our kids and selves reading actual books so they don't become a lost Art...like bouncing a ball, singing, playing and moving with others.

    I teach music and have noticed over the years that the little ones no longer know nursery rhymes, children's songs, hand clapping games...all of which are very helpful in learning to read and write. This year my P. E. teacher and I discovered that our kinders are now coming to us unable to bounce a ball. The children can operate a video game with ease but are missing just being kids. Thank you technology.

    Ok, let me get off my rant. Your books sound great. Please put my name in the hat for the drawing. Have a great Thanksgiving everyone!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bettie,
      I will enter your name and I have noticed my students can't do the simplest things but yesterday one did fix my computer!

      Delete
  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. Jewel, welcome to Seekerville. I kept a few of my favorite childhood books to share with my children. Then I kept some of my favorite books I bought them, and now I pull them out for my granddaughters who love to look at them when they come over.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jackie,
      I smiled when you wrote you kept your favorite childhood books. I have all my Laura Ingalls Wilder books still . I keep them at school for kids to read.

      Delete
  8. Welcome to Seekerville, Jewell. I completely agree with all of your points. My 90- year-old aunt was always an avid reader. She often four or five books a week. Sadly, her eyes have deteriorated so she's unable to read, but her mind is sharp as a tack.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jill.
      Does your aunt have access to audio books? Just a thought. Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  9. RUTHIE - Cookies for breakfast?! I'm in! I recently bought the giant danish kringle from Trader Joe's and OH MY GOODNESS. Let's just say, I'm glad TJ's is a half hour away.

    I agree 100% with your points, JEWELL! (Great name, btw!) Jane Austen and Charles Dickens never took a creative writing class. They learned how to write novels by reading them.

    My husband is an English Lit teacher at our local high school so reading is a big deal in our house. All of our (5) nightstands are covered in stacks of books!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Josee
      You have a house filled with books! I am on my way! Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  10. Josee... what is a Danish Kringle???????? Tell more, please!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a great post, Jewell! I've always been a reader. Even when my eyes had trouble as a young girl, I loved reading. Now, I don't get reading time as often as I would like (two boys and a traveling husband will do that to a schedule), but I read with any moments I get. :) I love how you shared your advantages of reading. And, you're right. I'm learning so much about writing through reading great books.

    My boys have loved books since they were babies, and even at 12 and 13 1/2, they are avid readers. This mama couldn't be happier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jeanne,
      I am glad you liked my post. As a teacher I think reading is the best skill we can teach our kids. I can't imagine my life without books.

      Delete
  12. Jewell said: If we exercise our bodies then we should also exercise our minds.

    So I'm thinking my brain is ready for an Iron Man Decathalon.....my body? Not so much!

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  13. Is a Danish Kringle like Kringla?My husband is of Norwegian descent so every year I bake him kringla which are like a soft sweet pretzel.

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  14. Hello JEWELL! I'm grateful that my parents imparted to me a love for reading! I'm also grateful for the INCREDIBLE authors and soon to be published here in Seekerville.

    HAPPY FRIDAY EVE!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Caryl,
      Nice to hear from you this morning. Yea for readers!

      Delete
  15. The WORD became flesh and dwelt among us.
    Our names will be written in the BOOK of life.
    What better example?

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  16. The post makes me want to.......what's that word Tina used a while back about...okay got it.... deconstructing a romance novel.
    This makes me want to deconstruct Dr. Seuss and try to write a book in his poetic cadence.

    Oh the reading is fine
    But your bedtime is nine
    We can't close up that book
    without just one more look.


    Okay I'm quitting now. I

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary,
      There's your next challenge. A book of poetry ala Dr. Seuss.
      :)

      Delete
  17. Yes, Jewell! It is similar, I think. Trader Joe's only sells the sweet ones and the one I tried had an almond filling. I'm thankful I had a house full of relatives who devoured it otherwise I would have eaten half. It's pretty amazing.

    http://www.livingtraderjoes.com/danish-kringle-trader-joes/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds the same. I make mine with almond extract.

      Delete
  18. I love books. I have a Kindle, but I love the "heft" of a book in my hands. Library books knowing that someone else has also enjoyed them, yard-sale paperbacks that I can take to the beach and not worry about ruining them, the sweet surprise when I* open the mailbox to find a Seeker or Villager book that I won here. The first page and how the author hooks me in. Vintage children's books, especially the Little Golden Books illustrated by Eloise Wilkin. Recommending books to others. Also, they're the easiest gift ever to wrap. I'm just sayin'.
    Kathy Bailey

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    Replies
    1. Kaybee
      I agree. I share books with everyone and some of my favorites have been books people passed along to me. It's a great way to find new authors.

      Delete
  19. Good morning, Jewell! Middle school was the age I really latched onto books. As a teacher, your love of books influences your students in ways you might not even see right now. This is the age when so many foundations are forming for them. Thank you for your service to the community. You're making a huge difference.

    I remember my middle school teacher actually read to us out loud. It was awkward at first, but after a while we were all hooked and couldn't wait to get to class. Looking back, I bet there were many who hadn't had the privilege of being read to as children. There's definitely something magical that happens. Keep up the good work in teaching and writing.

    Your historical series set in Omaha sounds intriguing. History is my first literary love. I can't wait to read them. Thanks for dropping by Seekerville!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Renee,
      Nice to see you again. I love books. Middle school is a great time to hook readers. Happy reading!

      Delete
  20. Hi Jewell and welcome to Seekerville. Wow, you don't have to do much convincing to tell me to read. LOL. I'm a retired middle school teacher so I know what you are saying is very true. Reading is wonderful and thank you for teaching our children the wonders of a good book. Thank you also for such an encouraging post. Reading does improve the writing skills also. You need to read in the genre you want to publish so you'll have a sense of story that the publisher requires.

    Thank you again for joining us. Have a fun day.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sandra,
      Thanks for your kind words. Someday I 'd like to be a retired middle school teacher.

      Delete
  21. Ruthy are you sharing those cookies? I'll have some and I hope they're snickerdoodles. My favorite. smile

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  22. Hi Jewell! I loved your post.

    In the course of our last move, our adult children moved with us and lived with us temporarily. That temporary arrangement lasted four years. To make room, one of the things I put in storage was my collection of books. Twelve boxes of books.

    When my daughter got married last summer, I turned her bedroom into my office, and was finally able to unpack my books. As I opened the boxes, I almost cried. All of my friends! I had missed them so much!

    I know I can open up like this here...my husband doesn't really understand this part of my life. :)

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  23. Jewell, My mother always told me to read, read and read. I love the library and am a supporter of the Friends of the library. I'm currently an officer on the board of our local library. Books are my passion and maybe that's why I decided to write. As a writer I sometimes feel guilty reading when I should be writing. I love your reasons why. They actually give you permission to do so. I like the analogy of looking at it as exercising your mind. Good point. Thanks for sharing.

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  24. Love to read! I have bookcases of books. But sadly not enough time in the day. I have the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys collections I was going to share with my kids. They didn't like those books, so they are being saved. My hot wheels collection was enjoyed by my son and has now reverted back to me since he's too "old" to play with them. I don't know what that means. When I decorate for Christmas I pull out the legos and lincoln logs and hot wheels too. Doesn't everybody? lol. I discovered Goosebumps so am working on that collection. And all my Love Inspired books. Can't have too many of those! And my signed books collection. That is my favorite. I have a couple of books that have my great grandmother's signature in them. Keeping them to go with the genealogy stuff I do. I've commissioned my son to watch over it. Nobody else cares. One day someone will and appreciate it. Going to read now!

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  25. Jewell, Finn is happy to share with you! We've got some with sprinkles... and some without.

    What's your pleasure and Finn and I will serve you!

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  26. Sandra, not snickerdoodles today! Homemade sugar cookies, with homemade butter icing... and sprinkles!!!

    I'll bring snickerdoodles to the next retreat. Promise!!!

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  27. JEWELL, WELCOME BACK TO SEEKERVILLE!!

    And trust me, my friend, you had me at "books" because reading is perhaps one of the few therapies I allow myself, which is why I read approximately 6-8 books a month.

    Granted, those reads are mostly in transit while hubby is driving, at restaurants when he goes to the restroom, waiting for doc appts., in the powder room throughout the day, and at night in bed, but I still enjoy every single moment. Sometimes TOO much, which eats into my writing time here and there. Like once, when I was reading one of Tamera Alexander's books, I literally couldn't stop, so I pushed my laptop aside and read for a good part of the day. Of course, that's only happened once because I can't afford to deplete my writing time, no matter how beneficial/enjoyable reading is for me. :)

    Obviously I'm a pretty fast reader, although not as fast as I once was. You see, I took an Evelyn Wood speed-reading class in my 20s and actually read The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck in ten minutes with something like a 90% comprehension level. But I wouldn't recommend that for pleasure readers because obviously you miss a lot of the emotion and beauty of a book with that.

    Hugs!
    Julie

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    Replies
    1. Hi Julie,
      thanks for your comments. I also gave to push myself away. My hubby gets annoyed because I read and watch television at the same time!

      Delete
    2. Wow, Julie! My best friend in grade school could speed read. My dad would give her a book, have her read a few pages, time her and then ask her what it was about. It fascinated him, as it did all of us.

      Delete
  28. This is a great post. I love to read an have been scolded for reading and writing so many reviews. the sad thing is they have not learned to relax by reading. I have come to the conclusion I am not going to let them control my life. I will continue to read and write. The air quality is better today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Wilani,
      Keep on doing what you do. We need readers and reviewers. Bless you.

      Delete
  29. Sally once years ago, in a cleaning fit, I gave away an entire set of Trixie Belden books. I regret VERY LITTLE that I've thrown away in my life. But that was a mistake.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh I loved Tricia Belsen books. I haven't heard that name in years.

      Delete
  30. JEWELL, welcome to Seekerville! Thank you for this encouraging post on the benefits of reading. You've nudged me to carve out more time to read.

    Thomas Jefferson sold his collection of books to The Library of Congress after a fire destroyed most of its books in the War of 1812. Then later he sold another collection to pay his creditors. Books were part of him. It had to hurt to part with them.

    Janet

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    Replies
    1. Poor TJ ! I !d hate to sell my books. My favorites are my Mary Connealy signed ones. I read them over and over.

      Delete
  31. Jewell it might be fun. I don't do much writing outside my own genre and fiction.

    But that really would be cool. Did I ever tell you I once wrote a country western song? I called it, "I've Got Bambi On My Hands: An Ode to Buckskin Gloves"
    I've never tried to sell it.
    In fact I don't have it anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  32. And now that I think of it, I might've just written the title.

    No, there was definitely a song.

    Hmmmmmm

    ReplyDelete
  33. JULIE, I didn't know you took a speed reading course, but I'm not surprised by the number of books you consume. I'm a slow reader. Sometimes if I love a sentence I reread it just for the sheer pleasure of savoring the words.

    Janet

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  34. LOL The Good Earth in TEN MINUTES??? Julie! way to go. 90% comprehension. Wow. Double wow. This has to be some kind of monument to speed reading.

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  35. MARY, I was processing the loss of your Trixie Beldon books, feeling bad for you, then you got me laughing at your country song. Poor Bambi!

    Janet

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  36. I do feel bad about Trixie. :( My granddaughter would read them right now. And they don't seem to be available on Amazon except as used books. I wonder why they are being reprinted.

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  37. I read The House of the Seven Gables in about three hours. But it wasn't speed reading and I doubt my comprehension level would impress anyone. It was just so BAD I figured out pretty fast I could read the first paragraph and the last paragraph of every chapter and get the story....the rest was just filler. The man was obsessed with a flock of chickens (I get it, it was about inbreeding and the chicken flock deteriorated along with the family....or something like that--heck I might've missed nuances!!!)
    When I finally read like the whole last chapter it had a kind of interesting wrap up and all I could think was, "Huh, who knew this book was going to have a plot."

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  38. My mother in law made such delicious snickerdoodles.
    She was the best, Ruthy.
    She made an apple pie so perfect that I swear if she'd been ambitious in that way, she could have parlayed apple pies into a run for the governor and won.
    You're very good, too, Ruthy. And all this talk of Kringle and cookies added to an unfortunate picture I saw earlier has made me seriously consider driving ONE HOUR this afternoon to find and eat one of those chocolate lava cakes.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I could make my own chocolate lava cake. I have a recipe called Hot Fudge Pudding Cake.

    But My Cowboy would growl about calories, while he gobbled down his share.

    Better I should drive the hour.

    It's for family harmony right? I'm always am generous that way.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Welcome, Jewell! I love all these great reasons for reading, and your post is the perfect follow-up for Tina's recent blog on comfort reads. There just aren't enough reading hours in the day for all the wonderful books I'd like to read. Very seldom have I put a book down because it didn't grab me right away, but for the sake of time I've had to get much more selective. As the old saying goes, the cream rises to the top (of my TBR pile).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Myra,
      I have one of those piles too and I keep adding to it. :)

      Delete
  41. Oh MARY! I feel your regret. My set didn't make it somewhere along the line. I've tried to collect them again, but couldn't find them. I loved Trixie Belden. I'm thinking I let someone borrow them that was supposed to return them, but who never did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish I could have back all the books I have loaned out. Maybe those people cherished the books so much they couldn't bear to part with them.

      Delete
  42. Julie, freshman at Nazareth Academy were required to take a speed reading course when I was 14... it has been a huge help to me ever since. I've often wondered why other schools don't see the importance of that as they prep kids for life... Oh my gosh, I can still use those techniques today. And it's been THIRTY YEARS!!!!!

    (STOP LAUGHING, CONNEALY!!!!)

    Jewell... Yes to almond extract. In the cookies and the frosting. This is why we could be good friends. We know good stuff.

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    Replies
    1. I go through Almond extract like it's water. I add it to everything, including coffee and hot cocoa.

      Delete
  43. Jewell, thanks for giving us all permission to read!! I've been a voracious reader since I checked out my first library books before I started school. I firmly believe it helped shape me as a person, offered me an escape when I needed it, improved my writing ability, increased my vocabulary, acted as a stress reducer, sparked my imagination, allowed me to become a world traveler while remaining at home, and so many other wonderful things. My husband used to say we needed a second U-Haul truck just for my library everytime we moved.

    It's hard to find the time to read during the day now, but I spend an hour or two after bedtime to immerse myself in another novel. Unlike some people, I never read a book twice. There are too many books to read and so little time. :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Barb,
      I am always glad to hear from passionate readers.

      Delete
    2. Who else only reads a book once?

      Delete
  44. VINCE!

    "How to Read a Book" changed my reading life, too! Fabulous. Just fabulous.

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  45. I am curious now. I will have to check into that book.

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  46. Hi, I'm a full time high school student, part time college student, part time writer, and all the time reader. I couldn't survive without books, and frankly I'm not sure if I would want to.

    Please enter my name in the drawing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will be happy to. Good luck with all your studies.

      Delete
  47. I actually have to read "How to Read a Book" for school, but I find it the most boring thing in the world (after the economics and government books that I have to read for school too). Why do I have to read about how to read a book anyway?

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  48. Jewell,

    You must truly be!
    That you do so much - MG teacher, author and not afraid to assign homework. <3 ya already. :)

    Great points about reading today, and how very important it is.

    (By the way, I taught 5th back in the day, and now write MG series about a K9 Spy! And we do school visits too. :) Love da kidz...)

    and to Nicky's question above ^^^

    Well, I've taken lessons on how to study the Bible and found it quite worthwhile. There are things to know to make reading not only easier but to increase comprehension. I'm unsure if the book you're reading will help you, but it might!

    Y'all have a wonderful day.

    Thanks for being in Seekerville, Jewell. Enjoyed your post!

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    Replies
    1. Hello May the Spy and thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  49. Jewell, I love this post! You know, I've learned a lot about history from reading historical romance novels. And I know reading really improved my vocabulary. I can even tell a different in my kids' vocabularies--the one who is a reading nut has always had a larger vocabulary.

    And of course, I love to escape in a good story.

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  50. TYPO ALERT! I can't stand not being able to correct it. LOL I meant to say I can tell a DIFFERENCE in my kids' vocabularies. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Missy,
      Reading does make a huge difference for students and adult readers.

      Delete
  51. Julie, that's amazing that you could read so quickly! I can remember a class in high school where they tried to teach us some sort of speed reading method. I never could do it!

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  52. Jewell, I don't know why, but I've never been a big reader. And when I do, it's like I read several books in a row and then that brings me down--almost depressed. I don't know if it's because I must resurface and enter reality again or what.

    Also, the more books I read the less it takes for an author to annoy me. I get bored quicker. Does that make sense?

    So I tend to read 2-3 books and then not pick up another one for several months. I wished I could read 2-3 chapters every night and just enjoy reading like Ruthy used to do.

    My kids enjoy reading though. One of my sons broke the school record in AR points in 7th or 8th grade. That's got to give me some kind of brownie points.

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  53. I hope someone got my Trixie Beldens and cherished them.

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  54. Jewell you CHERISH my books? Okay, now I'm kinda weepy.
    Thanks so much for that. I love your books, too!!!!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mary! Now that is an endorsement.

      Delete
  55. What I'm LAUGHING about Herne is you slipping memory. It's been more like....uh, c'mon...45 years????? Okay 50!!!

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  56. Hi Jewell, sorry for my tardiness. I had to get my naturally brown hair, touched up.

    Welcome back. Always fun to have you Nebraska folks here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand. I have been doing the same. I think it's time to quit!

      Delete
  57. Fun post, Jewell. I absolutely love to read and I always make time for it, usually at night before I go to sleep. I would love to win your book.

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  58. I will put you in the drawing Sandy. Thank you for commenting.

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  59. Jewell, I love, love, love your post. Great info about the benefits of reading. As if we needed an excuse. I'm excited to learn that more people prefer REAL books...written on paper, with pages to turn. :)

    Also you've given me a reason to stop work and spend time reading...even in the afternoon! :)

    Usually I read at night, although often my eyes begin to droop too soon. Pausing in the afternoon to read sounds decadent!

    Thanks for being with us today!

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    ReplyDelete
  60. Very, very late to this post, but I am a book nut! Love,love,love to read. always have. Got in trouble many times in childhood for reading all night because I didn't want to close the book. My mom learned quickly that sending me to my room wasn't punishment.
    I hope my son learns to love reading. Right now, it's a bit of work for him.

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  61. I am also a book nut. Have been since I learned to read when dinosaurs roamed the earth. I've been doing more e-reading because I have no room in my home for the number of books I read each year. I still read a lot of paperbacks too. My goal of late is to try and instill the love of reading in my grandchildren. Which is difficult when tablets are glued to their hands or their watching TV. Even education TV can't replace a good book. I homeschooled my children. Two are avid readers. The other three not so much. All of them read to find out what they don't know. But only one of them has my love of fiction. My second son tells his teen son not to waste too much time reading fiction but rather go do something more useful. Not sure how video gaming is more useful. LOL! He would prefer to see him outside involved in sports or reading for knowledge sake. Stress is a big factor for teens and reading is a much more relaxing escape than gaming. But then again I'm old.
    My granddaughter struggles with reading. The public school doesn't have a strong phonic program. I keep encouraging her that reading will unlock many doors for her for whatever she wants to do in the future. Talking about the action in the books she reading is beginning to inspire her to keep pressing in to improve her reading skills. Love to see this enxt generation fall in love with reading.

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  62. Hi Jewell. I so enjoyed your post and, yes, I confess to also being a book nut. One joy of being such an addict is being able to share that gift with my grandchildren. For one in particular, reading was a struggle. She was very slow in school and hated, hated (how could that happen?) to read. All subjects were suffering. They live close by and I asked her parents if I could work with her at least two evenings per week. Oh, what joy when that light bulb illuminated. A few assigned reading books warmed her up as we sat together and brought those stories to life. But after she started reading "Little House in the Big Woods" (also assigned), I have been blessed to see the joy she is now getting from her reading. The togetherness is a plus, but her reading is improving by leaps and bounds and I'm not sure who is enjoying it more. Reading is the base of everything. She pulls out her children's Bible and sounds out the word...and smiles when the message sinks in. God bless you for teaching!

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  63. Updating Vince's post:

    Hi Jewell:

    "Great books are a gateway into great minds."

    My biggest reading regret is all the books I read before I read "How to Read a Book" -- a book which really should have been titled "How to Read a Great Book".

    This book shows how to read a book on many different levels at the same time. For example: how to read Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" as history, psychology, philosophy, social commentary, political science, business management, salesmanship, drama, literature, etc. It shows how to interactively read a book; how to question an author; even how to have a 'dialogue' with an author who lived thousands of years ago.

    After reading "How to Read a Book" I saw for the first time why books I didn't think were that great (when read on just one level) really were works of genius! And why Shakespeare may be the greatest writer of all time.

    Do this type of reading for a while and layering will become hardwired on your brain. This will also help in writing in layers as well.

    If you are going to spend a lifetime reading books, I suggest reading "How to Read A Book" as soon as possible.


    Please enter me in the drawing for "Lessons Learned" and keep up the great work with kids. If you can give children the gift of a love of reading, then you have made them lifetime learners.

    Vince

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