Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Comfort Reads


Comfort reads are like an old friend we see once a year. Oh, the format may vary from hardcover to paperback, to an ebook, but inside they're exactly the same. And we're grateful. We count on them to provide us with the same promised reading experience.

Reading the same story more than once delivers a guarantee multiple times  Why does a toddler want the same bedtime book read over and over? They want the promised emotional response again and again. Don't dare change a word, an expression or a character voice-over. 

Comfort reads. Incomparable. Absolutely unforgettable. Magical.

We become lost in a world that generously takes us in and feeds us good words, and fellowship. They promise to always be there for us, day or night. They promise to never change.

It's we the reader who changes. Our outlook, needs, and expectations change. 



One of my very first comfort reads was a book I read many times as a teen in the late sixties. It was about a teenage couple in the fifties. It's a classic, with a 4.26 rating on Goodreads though it's relatively unknown and its yellowing pages have a copyright date of 1955. That's over sixty years old! When it was borrowed and lost, I was  devastated. It took decades for me to find an original edition on eBay. I don't actually read it anymore, as my comfort reading has changed, however simply looking at the cover brings me joy.

My needs have become...complicated, as I face birth and death and everything in-between.

Often times I find myself empty of a much-needed emotional response because my reservoir is empty. On other occasions, I have particular books I pull from the shelf to simply to reassure myself that joy, happiness, humor, purity, love and honor still exist. 

As a writer, I also read because I love words. I love the way certain words roll off my tongue. Like truncated, babble or glistening. I love the way two words come together and explode into a sensory delight. One of my favorite word combinations is from the Bible- "hot displeasure." Powerful imagery, right? 

I'm mesmerized with how certain authors string together the same words that I do and but produce different and wondrous results. I read to remind myself that this is the magic I long to create. I believe that if you read amazing works you will eventually produce amazing works.





 And isn't it true that every time you step into a comfort read you find something new? Surely that wasn't there last time? 





What are your comfort reads? Have they changed over time? Just how many comfort reads do you have? We won't tell. Any particular one or two, or three, that you'd like to tell us about?

Leave a comment for an opportunity to win a Comfort Read Surprise Giveaway package that includes a lovely pillow cover. Winner announced in the Weekend Edition. 









This post has been brought to you by the Queen of Comfort reads. Before she left Colorado for Arizona, she had so many comfort reads that they shifted the floor in her office making it impossible to close the door.

Do stop by to like her author page on Facebook (Tina Radcliffe Author), and follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and Bookbub. You can sign up for her newsletter here.

205 comments :

  1. Must go read a few pages of tonight's comfort read before bed. Help yourself to the pumpkin or cinnamon bagels. Coffee pot is set to brew. (Where is Helen? Did we fail to give her a raise??)

    Talk to you in the morning.

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  2. My comfort read of all time....God's word. I especially savor the book of Psalm, they bring comfort & reassurance. They're my go-to scriptures in my time of need, God always speaks to my situation in them, ALWAYS! It's amazing that no matter what life throws at me, there is a scripture perfectly fit within the book of Psalm :-)

    While there are many great books out there and I've enjoyed my share over my life, nothing is more comforting than being in God's Word.... it's life and health to the soul!

    P.S. I need that pillow because it's what I say every night :-)

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    1. I overslept so am embedding comments. This should make you and Ruthy smile. HA. I like your style lady!!! The Bible is a great choice.

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    2. Tina...please know I was giving you a hard time and meant no disrespect about the comments. I do know it's not everyone's preference so it's really okay. If it got taken the wrong way, I do apologize for that!

      Also, I'd love to be in the draw for the comfort read surprise giveaway, thanks!

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    3. P.S. I meant to add, I've really been thinking about this for a few days and have been convicted in my heart. Sometimes I feel I go overboard with my teasing and it really is innocent. It's hard to tell that when you can't talk face-to-face with someone. Please know, I never mean any harm, I always have good intent behind my words.

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    4. I'm monitoring homework and saw embedded comments and WEPT OPENLY!!!!! WHAT??????

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    5. Oh, Trixi, bless your heart!!!! Your comments were fine, we tease each other all the time... and we're used to it!

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  3. Hi Tina, I do have some comfort reads. Never called them that but the name fits. smile. I have someof Janet Dailey's first books. Touched By the Wind is a favorite. I have Rebecca by Daphne DuMurier and of course, Gone With The Wind is always a favorite. I loved Exodus by Leon Uris and I also have some of James Mitchner's books I love to reread.

    Thanks for sharing this. Maybe I should go dig one of those up. LOL

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    1. I do remember when I had the entire JD collection in my little starter house when the kids were all little. Such great comfort reads, Sandra!

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  4. Hi Tina:

    For me a comfort read need not be comforting. It only needs make me feel comfortable. Perhaps I just like what the author is trying to say. Maybe the book just brings me back to a time that was less complicated and thus more comfortable. It could even be a book I didn't understand the first few times I read it but now, many years later, I see the wisdom and even the humor in the writing.

    There was a time, a brief one month period, when my two brothers and I shared a bedroom and during the time my father read one chapter a night from the "Wizard of Oz". This is the only book he ever read to the three of us. Today anything "Wizard of Oz" is comforting to me.

    Today I can think of two comfort reads: 1) the "Sisterhood of the Dropped Stitches Quartet" by Janet Tronstad and 2) "The Great Cycle" by Tarjei Vesaas.

    Please place me in the drawing for the pillow case which in itself I find comforting.

    Vince

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    1. What a lovely story about your dad, Vince! You are entered. Thank you for sharing.

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  5. A comfort read is like having a conversation with a good friend. I have a number of comfort reads. Books that I re-read for the sheer pleasure. No one genre or author. Just books that resonate with me. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry comes to mind.

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  6. My comfort read is Pride & Prejudice. Just reading a couple chapters will have me smiling. I several books I can pull off my shelf depending on my mood, but in the end it's all about the escape. Paired with coffee I'm all the more happy.

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    1. Samantha Hite, Welcome to Seekerville. Yes, it does depend on the mood. I pick a certain book when I want to travel to a specific emotional destination. Coffee!!!!

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  7. What a great post Tina! My first comfort read was when I was in fourth grade.That book was Junket by Anne H. White, and it was a story about a junkyard dog. I loved it and it helped get me through some tough times. Later on I fell in love with Mrs. Mike by Benedict & Nancy Freedman. I haven't read it in several years but that was the book that helped me through my teenage years. Right now, my comfort books are more my comfort authors, when I find an author I love, I find their books speak to me and give me comfort. Also, my main source of comfort comes from reading my Bible.

    Many blessings to you all!
    Cindy W.

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    1. Thank you for sharing, Cindy W. I actually picked up Mrs. Mike because so many of the Seekers and Villagers recommended it. It's on my TBR. Thank you for sharing.

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  8. My first comfort read was Stuart Little. It was the first book I remember purchasing at the local bookstore with my allowance on a cold, rainy Friday night. Gone With the Wind remains one of my adult favorites along with Jesus Calling.

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    1. See how you remember the entire experience of purchasing that first book. So many visceral memories, Jill. That's why we are now writers.

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  9. Comfort read - so much better (in calorie count) than comfort food!


    I love the idea of a comfort read, but I can't call to mind any current ones. Most of my "comfort reads" would be older books associated with the feelings at the time. In that case, my all time best comfort read would be THE HAPPY HOLLISTERS. All I have to do is look at those childhood books on my shelf to remember how reading has always been such an important part of my life.

    These days, any book that can pull me out of my writer's head and lose me in the story is a book I cherish.

    Wishing you all time with a comfort read today.

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    1. "These days, any book that can pull me out of my writer's head and lose me in the story is a book I cherish." That's a part of it, Cate. And as writers these books are harder and harder to find.

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    2. Pam Hollister was my favorite character in fourth grade. I loved The Happy Hollisters. Guilty true story. When I first got my Kindle, I downloaded several Happy Hollisters books and reread them.
      Whenever I see someone else knows who the Happy Hollisters are, I always try to respond because I loved those books.

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  10. I love to read romances and find comfort in my favorite authors. I also find comfort in the Sister Chicks series, and of course when I need real serious comfort I turn to Psalms.

    When I started deconstructing novels, I started to read again some suspense stories by Lynette Eason, and it was like getting together with an old friend.

    Thanks for this great post, Tina!

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    1. Jackie! You are welcome. Isn't that funny, I find deconstructing novels comforting as well.

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  11. Hmmm...I've never thought about "comfort reads." I guess when I was a teenager, Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys books were my comfort reads. I could get lost in those books for hours, and the best part was when I finished a book I knew there was another one with the same key characters. Maybe that's why I'm drawn to series type books. Reading about all the people in a small town and getting to know their stories is comforting. I think it's time to go find a new comfort read series...good thing I get the entire week off next week!

    LOL..Mary Curry! No calories...I love it! Another reason to love reading!!

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    1. Rhonda, I love a series for that reason too. I know on my favorite reads, I avoid THE END. I simply do not want it to be over.

      OFF AN ENTIRE WEEK!!!! WOOOT!

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  12. Cindy, I re-purchased a copy of "Mrs. Mike" several years ago... one of my teen favorites and such a beautiful love story, but also a wonderful template for life... when Kathy came back to Boston and no one would give her a drink of water and she saw how jaded life can be... when there aren't big problems to deal with, petty things increase in size. I think of this often, when I see folks get bent out of shape for such little things...

    That stellar example in that book helped me to learn how to weigh things and work on what's truly important. It's such a great story!

    Great post, Tina. My comfort reads have been usurped by rocking babies and wiping grubby faces, so it's a new kind of comfort... but sweet, nonetheless!

    I brought eggnog to go along with the scheduled comfort!!!

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    1. Can't wait to read Mrs. Mike, Ruthy, since everyone recommends this book.

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  13. Comfort reads . . . What an interesting thought. Mine are The Little Princess and Secret Garden from Francis Hodgson Burnett. Loves those as a little girl and still enjoy reading them today. I also love Sherlock Holmes. Great stories. Thanks, Tina. I enjoyed this discussion.

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    1. The Secret Garden resonated with me as well Kelly Bridgewater!

      Thank YOU for dropping by. (Go Broncos!!)

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  14. Well, one of my comfort reads is fairly new, but I do try to read it every year at Christmas time. A Season of Gifts by Richard Peck. One minute you are laughing, the next it's hard to read for the moisture in your eyes.

    I have 'liked' your author page. I'm trying to get to 500 likes on my page and stalled at 489. Let me know if you have any secrets to get more!

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    1. Oh, I haven't read Peck. Adding to my list, Rose. Will go and like you too.

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  15. CINDY, I haven't thought of Mrs. Mike in years, but I read it as a teen and loved it!

    CATE, I also loved the Happy Hollisters. A few years ago I bought a set of them from an Etsy shop and have them in my office now. I also loved Trixi Belden, Nancy Drew, Encyclopedia Brown, etc.

    Like several others here I love Lonesome Dove (although I have to read some parts with my eyes closed, LOL) and I always enjoy reading To Kill a Mockingbird. Sometimes a quote from that book (or the incredible screenplay by Horton Foote) will pop into my head and just that little bit will bring comfort. This is one of my favorites: “Neighbors bring food with death and flowers with sickness and little things in between. Boo was our neighbor. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies, and our lives. But neighbors give in return. We never put back into the tree what we took out of it: we had given him nothing, and it made me sad.” HARPER LEE

    ROSE, how do I find your author page?

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    1. Laura, just Google-Rose Ross Zediker Facebook and it is the first link.

      I LOVE To Kill a Mockingbird. Must reread. Thank you.

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  16. Hi Tina, Your column today is so comforting. I've been under a lot of stress recently and I plan to take an hour today and read one of my comforting books because of it. My all favorite is "Rebecca", but I'm drawn to another in my pile, "The Pilots Wife" by Anita Shreve. The emotional journey of the main character and her story strikes an inner cord and I lose myself completely inside the author's words. The first time I read it I didn't see the ending coming. My first book love was The Wizard of Oz as a child. I took it out from the library over and over. In fact I have both the old child's book and the new version of Wicked. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Funny you mention The Pilot's Wife, as I have used it as an example of an opening that draws you in on many occasion and have not read this book. I must rectify that.

      The opening proves you can break the rules...if you do it well. She does it well.

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  17. Tina, I forgot to tell you I saw saw pumpkin spice gum yesterday.

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    1. Pumpkin Spice gum sighting. Okay was it Extra gum? Must go on the hunt today.

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  18. Tina,
    I enjoyed this comforting post and like you my need for comforting reads has changed over the seasons of my lie.

    My comfort reads now are more a type of book than any specific one. I love the feeling I get when I read stories about Christmas, or books that have that as their setting. Those feelings you talked about, joy, happiness, humor, purity, love and honor can always be found in one form or another at Christmas.

    I know I've read more than a hundred Christmas setting books but it never gets old. I've been known to settle in with a Christmas story in the sweltering heat of July, it's not the time of year that matters, it the feelings of love and giving that draws me. They're the books I can't let go of when I'm trying to whittle down my bookshelves.

    And of course, the greatest Christmas story ever told, the birth of Jesus, stirs my heart with all those feelings, joy, love and giving too.

    I think I'll pull down a few favs and read them for the pure joy of it, thanks for all the comfort today!

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    1. You are welcome, Tracey. Your response made me smile, because of course, you get it. It's about the emotional response. Sometimes simply fingering the pages and reading a random page is all we need. Sometimes it's necessary to settle in for the long haul.

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  19. CATE My family had a subscription of some kind to the Happy Hollisters. We were very poor and big on the library so these books were close to all the books we owned. I think my mom tried repeatedly to cancel the subscription but could NOT get them to stop coming. She'd refuse to pay the bill and they'd still come and then sort of threatening bills would come and she's finally get the books stopped and then pay, and then THE BOOKS WOULD START COMING AGAIN.
    Maddening for her, but I loved them!!!!!!!

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  20. I have so many books I read over and over and over...it's just weird. I mean maybe a rotation of 200 keeper books.
    But I don't know if they qualify as comfort reads.

    I do have a few Louis L'Amour books I really love out of all his books, of which I am an avid reader.

    But they two that I really love are Down the Long Hill about an 8 year old boy who is stranded in the wilderness with a 3 year old girl.

    He's traveling to reach his father. His father realizes something happened and is traveling to find him. It tugs at my heartstrings, that father and his fear and hope and pride in his son, believing he can survive, hang on and know his father will come.

    The other one is Flint. It's about a wealthy NY Business man who's wife hires a killer to shoot him.
    And about that same time learns he's dying of cancer.
    So he came from the west but headed east because he was a little too tough at too young an age and knew he'd end up a gunfighter if he stayed in the west, and figured he'd die young.
    Now he sets up his estate so his wife gets nothing and vanishes. Planning to die somewhere in secret, an old hideout from his youth.

    And then there's trouble and a beautiful woman and he ain't got time to die.

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    1. Of course keeper books are comfort books, Mary Connealy. Unless it's for research. I'm the same. I have whittled it down to a lesser amount due to all the moves I have made, but those keepers are my comfort.

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  21. For Laura Conner Kestner

    https://www.facebook.com/roserosszedikerauthor/

    Thanks, Laura!

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  22. Thanks, ROSE, I found it. If anyone else here has an author page I would be glad to "like" it and offer support however I can.

    MARY, Flint sounds fascinating, I need to look for that one.

    TINA, thanks for such an interesting post!

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    1. It's a great book, Laura! Yay I lured someone to read Louis L'Amour. LOL

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    2. Mary....My dad was a HUGE Louis M'Amour fan! He also liked Zane Gray. I guess you could call him a HUGE western fan....TV, books, movies, etc. Maybe that's why my favorite theme in books is also western :-)

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    3. You gotta love auto-correct!! ARGG, it misspelled Mr. L'Amour's name...so sorry!

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    4. Trixi my father-in-law was a western fan. I think he liked Zane Grey better than L'Amour....the dork. :D A nice dork. LOL

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  23. What a great post with Thanksgiving coming up, TINA. And I needed to reflect on some old Favorites amidst the hecticness of getting ready to leave the farm for winter. LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE was probably my young girl comfort. The. Came Janette Oke LOVE COMES SOFTLY. Now that I review books, I haven't had much time to think about rereading any Favorites. I found a book MARYA on my bookshelf, I haven't read that in about ten years but there for awhile I read it every year or two, and need to again. Thanks again for taking time out of NANOWRIMO for us. Please enter my name in the draw. YOU GO GIRL!!!

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    1. Marianne! You are entered. Sometimes we have to stop to smell the dusty pages!!!

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    2. Marianne, I love the LITTLE HOUSE series. I was thrilled when my daughters read the stories. Now my granddaughter is enjoying them! That brings comfort! :)

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  24. Besides books for the really young, I didn't have any comfort books from my childhood because I didn't read. (After I got past the Blaze books...)
    My older sisters always went to their room to read and me and my brother have a lot of good memories of knocking their door open and then running for our lives.

    Like Mary, there are a couple of Louis L'Amour books I could read over and over. Reilly's Luck is one of my favorites. It's about a lady who orders her four-year old son to be left in a blizzard to die, but the child winds up getting left with a gambler instead w/out the mother's knowledge. The gambler raises him, takes, him to Europe and all. And of course, my favorite part, is when the son meets his mother again.

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    1. Oh, my goodness, what a story, Connie Queen. Now lie down on the couch and I will psychoanalyze you and Mr.L'Amour and that book. That for sure is a HEA in a twisted way.

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    2. That's all familiar, Connie, but I haven't read it in a while. I'm definitely digging that one up. We own a LOT of Louis

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    3. Okay, back from the library. I got Reilly's Luck. I didn't even hunt through my stack of L'Amour books. This was easier!

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  25. Aw, this post was all warm and fuzzy! Love it. Thank you, TINA. I can't say I re-read many books...but for comfort, there's nothing like The Bible, specifically, the Psalms and the Gospels. I recently found my hard-cover collection of Nancy Drew books my mom bought me when I was my son's age (12) and read "The Hidden Staircase." It had me smiling ear-to-ear!

    "Pride & Prejudice" or anything by Jane Austen is comforting. Actually, classics, in general are great comfort reads. That's a fun pillow cover, BTW!

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    1. When I was working at the Glendale and Avondale libraries and saw all those Nancy Drews, I was in heaven. Those are comfort reads. A safe place where a happy ending was guaranteed. I agree Josee.

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  26. Hi Jackie Like you, when I truly need comfort, I go to the Bible. But a comfortable read to just relax is a treat also. smile

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  27. A wonderful reminder of all the good books we cherish, Tina--thank you!

    The books I have read again and again are Tolkien's The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy. I just love escaping to Middle Earth!

    Another favorite from my youth is Little Women. Maybe it's because I don't have sisters and always wanted one. So then I was blessed with two daughters, except they fought all the time. I used to tell them they'd better try to be friends because someday they would only have each other to recall the good times from their childhood. I'm glad to say that as adults they have become friends, even though they don't always agree.

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    1. I would have never taken you for a Hobbiter, Myra. Wow.

      Yes. Little Women is a comfort read for me as well.

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  28. Mary C. I'm worried about you. LOL FLint??? You are tooooo funny.

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    1. Maybe they don't fit in the COMFORT reads blog. But I do love that book. I think I like them because, though I love what Louis L'Amour does, these are a little off what he does and so very memorable. Ride the River by L'Amour, a GIRL SACKETT! I love that one, too.

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  29. Ha ha Myra, I had a sister. Be thankful.

    I love her dearly, but she was so spoiled.

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    1. Now I want to hear Sandra's SISTER's version of this, LOL! Remember Cora from Downton Abbey? "Sisters! You think it's going to be "Little Women" and they're at each other's throats all the time!" I laugh every time I think of that!

      Sisters can be so different... or amazingly alike. It's a strange world of women!!!

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  30. TINA, I love your post! Thanks for the reminder that comfort reads are so special. Those keepers on the shelf that make us feel or let us escape. As a kid, I loved Black Beauty.
    All of LaVyrle Spencer's historicals--and most of her contemporaries--are comfort reads for me. I've read them many times. Gone with the Wind and Jane Eyre are two old friends. Most of Susan Elizabeth Phillip's novels are keepers. She makes me laugh and feel. I keep Michener's Centennial and would love to read it again. These days my TBR pile is high so I don't get around to reading these great books again. I plan to remedy that.

    Janet

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    1. Several SEP books are comfort reads for me too, Janet. They do bring me to that happy place fast.

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    2. When I pick up a keeper, I get this feeling of anticipation that puts me in the frame of mind to savor every word. That happy place you speak of, Tina. I think writing a book that can have that impact is a gift we writers all strive for.

      Janet

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    3. My SEP books definitely made the move to our new house. :)

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  31. Ahhhh ... comfort reads! Just the very name relaxes me!

    I'm with Sandra and Jill on Gone With the Wind, obviously, although I haven't reread it in years. And like Jill, Jesus Calling gives me a warm feeling inside just seeing the cover, which is why it's a must-read for me everyday.

    I actually don't reread books, but there are a number of books that I own that I truly WANT to reread and those are Liz Curtis Higgs Scottish Lowland series (A 1700s Scottish allegory of Jacob and Esau/Rebecca and Leah that is sooooooo good!!), Francine Rivers' Mark of the Lion Series, Laura Frantz's Love's Reckoning and The Colonel's Lady, and Joann Bischof's The Cadence of Grace series (book 2 being the only book I ever had to take a sleeping pill after to even get to sleep, it was THAT compelling!!).

    And I know this may sound pretty narcissistic, but I used to reread my own books from the beginning of the series every time a new one came out. It started with the O'Connors family saga because frankly, I got so attached to those people that I could totally lose myself in their world. In all honesty, other than for God, I wrote those books for myself and my tastes, so I think that's why they comfort me so much -- it's like revisiting the family and the past I wished I had had as a child.

    Really cool post, Tina, and very unique. Just like you! :)

    Hugs,
    Julie

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    1. Okay, Julie, guilty. I reread my own books. Because yes, I too think they are real people. Aren't they? A part of US??

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    2. I re-read my own books sometimes. I just went through a ... bout of that.

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    3. I reread my books, too. It's hard to let go of the characters so it's my way of reconnecting. And I'll admit, seeing if the story works. Sometimes I'm so closed to a story by the time I turn it in that I've lost my objectivity.

      Janet

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    4. Hurrah!! Enjoy your Kindle Fire!!

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    5. OH. MY. GOODNESS!! Do you guys have ANY idea how good that makes me feel??? I thought everybody would think I was crazy for rereading my own books, but I guess I'm normal, huh? Don't answer that!

      And, yes, Tina, they ARE part of us, so for me, it's like reconnecting with family. :)

      Hugs!
      Julie

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  32. The Psalms are definitely comforting when life is scary or tough. Jesus Calling is a devotional I have read many times. Has anyone read Young's Jesus Always? Max Lucado's devotionals resonate with me.

    Janet

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    1. I read Jesus Calling and my Bible daily as well. I have not read Jesus Always. Have you, Janet?

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    2. No, but I'm thinking about asking my family to give it to me for Christmas. Can't have too many Sarah Young devotionals.

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    3. Janet, someone just gave me Jesus Always for my birthday, and I love it! I read all three of them every day -- Jesus Calling, Jesus Today, and Jesus Aways -- but I will admit my fave is Jesus Calling. It's as marked up as my Bible, and I actually read the daily Scripture chapters in full as my Bible reading for the day, so I like it a lot. :)

      Hugs,
      Julie

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  33. Other then the Bible and especially the Psalms and the book of Philippians, I have a couple of Grace Livingston Hill books I have read over and over as well as some from Francena Arnold another great Christian Fiction author from the 1950's. My problem now is that I have well over 100 books waiting on my to be read pile so I don't have time to go back and read any at the moment. Although I am going back and reading the Left Behind series in order and weaving the Left Behind kids where they fit in with the other series.

    I hope everyone is well. I am enjoying my time with my parents and I am beginning to feel better so hopefully I will get caught up on Nano by the end of the month.

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    1. There is something so charming and captivating about Grace Livingston Hill, Wilani. I love her books. Glad you are feeling better.

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  34. Ahhh.... Comfort reads. Well, Seekerville, for one. :-) Because you encourage, motivate, and tell us the hard truths to make us better writers.

    Additional comfort reads? Tennyson and Frost, of course. The Seekerville authors. Anything by Debbie Macomber. A book I read as a child, The Peculiar Miss Pickett, about a very special nanny. Since I'm a big Waltons fan, I'd love to read Earl Hamner, Jr's stories if I one day have time. I understand he was quite prolific.

    Of course, I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the hope-filled promises of the New Testament.

    Ohhh...I could go on and on. :-)

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  35. A comfort fan for sure, Cynthia. I must look into some of your reads. Thank you for sharing.

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  36. ...And side note: Thank you, Seekerville! I received my new Kindle Fire (from the October birthday bash) last week! Yaaay! Thank you, again, for a wonderful party and congratulations!

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    1. I'm glad it got there, Cynthia. That thing does LOTS more than be an ereader. My daughter lets her kids watch movies on it on long car rides.

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    2. So thrilled, Mary! I'm still experimenting! I'm somewhat tech-savvy, so how hard can it be? LOL Thank you!!!!

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  37. After a car accident and illness in the past 2.5 weeks, I've got comfort reading down pat! I have first editions of Mary Stewart's early Gothics such as "Nine Coaches Waiting" and "My Brother Michael" which are my go-to's for comfort reads. I also love anything by Daphne du Maurier and wish I could find some first editions of "Jamaica Inn" and "Frenchman's Creek". Both of these authors were master (mistresses?) of suspense and romance. And as my life's been upended this month, the Psalms are my best friend right now.

    Please put me in the drawing Tina, and I love all of these suggestions from everyone on what you read over and over for enjoyment and "comfort" in the repetition of story.

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    1. Have you read Phyllis Whitney, Laurie. Great classic gothics.

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    2. I was a total Phyllis Whitney fan at one time and they scared me silly!

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    3. Laurie, I'm so sorry about your accident and illness!

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    4. Oh, my! I didn't realize your accident was recent. Praying for your swift recovery, Laurie.

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    5. Oh yes, me, too, TINA! I was on a MAJOR Phyllis Whitney binge several years ago! I went through a used book store and bought up every single one I could find.

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    6. First, I'm so sorry about your accident! Second: I love Mary Stewart!!! Nine Coaches Waiting... Madame, Will You Talk??? Oh, be still my heart, I loved her stories!!!!

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    7. Laurie, sending prayers and hugs! I love Mary Stewart too! And Phyllis Whitney. Also Daphne du Maurier. Anyone remember Edna Ferber? She was in my mother's era, but I read all her stories!

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    8. Oh, Laurie, you reminded me -- I re-read all of Mary Stewart's books many, many times. Could not get enough of the Merlin-Arthur books. The first of hers I read was "Moonspinners," and I was her fan forever. Thanks for the reminder ... I need to get those down to read again.

      Nancy C

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  38. Winter Solstice. I read it almost every Christmas.

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  39. Laurie I've never read Daphne du Maurier except for Rebecca. I'll have to give that a try.

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  40. I have never thought of my old book friends as "comfort reads," but I like the term. It reminds me of "comfort foods" and that's never a bad thing! So, when I'm in need of comfort, I grab some chocolate and wrap up in a blanket and reach for the Psalms, Narnia, The Hobbit, The Once and Future King, The Neverending Story (WAY better than the movies, just trust me), or CS Lewis's Out of the Silent Planet.

    Although lately I've ventured out of the sci-fi/fantasy world and will grab for anything by Jan Drexler, Ruthy, Tina... or really any of the Seekers and various Seekervillagers.

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    1. I never read The Never Ending Story book. But my kids and I watched those movies over and over, Meg! Must find the book/s.

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    2. :)

      https://www.amazon.com/Neverending-Story-Michael-Ende/dp/0140386335/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1479233915&sr=8-1&keywords=the+neverending+story+book

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    3. Megan, you reminded me about the Narnia books, more favorites of mine. About fifteen years ago I had some health problems that sidelined me for about six weeks. During that time, my husband started reading the Narnia stories to me to help take my mind off things. As I got stronger, we took turns reading chapters to each other. Those days will always be precious memories!

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    4. I love that, Myra! It's amazing how such simple "children's" stories have impacted so many people. My sister and I used to read the chapters out loud to each other as well :)

      And Tina! I hope you enjoy it! The Neverending Story is one of the books I read out loud to my daughter when she was so small she couldn't even roll over yet. Granted, she didn't understand it at all, but it is such a sweet memory for me watching her react to my voice and sharing a favorite story with her.

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  41. Any book I pick up to read is my "Comfort Reads". I could use this book because I have been sick for weeks.
    Hot tea, lemon, and honey is my go to "Comfort Need".
    Thanks for entering me in your giveaway.
    Janet E.
    von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Library Lady I'm sorry you're sick. I hope you get well soon. God bless you.

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    2. I'm so sorry you've been sick such a long time, Library Lady! Have you tried zinc lozenges? I read they shorten sickness.

      Hugs, Janet

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    3. Janet E., I have to agree with you that just about any book I pick up is a comfort read. They just about all take me away somewhere, to the wonderful story world.

      I hope you feel better soon!

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    4. Sending chicken soup, Library Lady, and gentle hugs!

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  42. Oh yes, please enter me in the comfort drawing, I can never have to much of that.

    I'm enjoying all the recommendations, as if I don't have enough books in my TBR pile!

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    1. You are in Tracey!!! Books. Books. Books!!!

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  43. Great blog, Tina, that brought comfort! I don't usually reread books of fiction, although I've saved my Nancy Drew series, Little Women and some other favorites. Just touching the covers brings back so many delightful memories.

    The Bible, as many have mentioned, always comforts. I start the day with morning prayer that includes a number of psalms as well as other Old and New Testament readings. Yesterday Psalm 1 was the first scripture. The words and the cadence wrapped me in warmth, like a visit with an old friend.

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    1. Well, come on over to the dark side, Debby Giusti. Rereads are the BEST kind.

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    2. Debby....I never re-read books either! Besides the Bible that is :-)

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    3. I'm giving you a high five, Trixi! :)

      Hugs!

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  44. What a fun subject! When I was in grade school, my mother bought a collection of classic books from a door-to-door salesman, much to my father's chagrin. I devoured titles such as WIZARD OF OZ, ALICE IN WONDERLAND, and GULLIVER'S TRAVELS. Later in junior high, I added WHERE THE RED FERN GROWS and OLD YELLER to the list, which I can see have influenced me to always include the love of dogs in my work today.

    Nowadays, my comfort books turn to other themes, such as PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, and LORD OF THE RINGS. A weird mix of genres, I know. But there's something about good vs. evil with Christian symbolism that leaves me spellbound and full of hope in happy endings. And I'm a big fan of Austin's repetitive themes regarding the ushering in of women's rights.

    Now I'm off to bake pumpkin muffins. You got me hungry for them this morning, Tina. Have a good day, y'all!

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    1. RENEE, I never read the book but I watched Old Yeller and the story was so emotional that I remember sobbing.

      Janet

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    2. You've got a couple of MAJOR tear jerkers in there, Renee.

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    3. I love Lord of the Rings though I have to admit that I prefer the movies however, I have read the books. I would have to say that the Lord of the Rings are my comfort movies. The first two Hobbits too but the third just makes me cry.

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    4. Yes! Tear jerkers, all. Now if I could only translate that feeling to the page, I might sell something. Hahahaha.

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    5. Yes! Tear jerkers, all. Now if I could only translate that feeling to the page, I might sell something. Hahahaha.

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    6. I wouldn't say that Old Yeller is a comfort story, in fact I would say quite the opposite. When I was really young I watched the movie and it gave me nightmares. It scared me so silly that I still obsess about rabies today some ten years later. When I had to read the book I was quite turned off from it, plus the dog dies and that is just sad.

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    7. My mom and dad bought that classic collection from the door to door salesman too. My dad read to me many nights. RENEE! I bought pumpkin spiced instant Quaker Oatmeal just now.

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    8. My mom bought Readers Digest Condensed Books. So I read Winds of War and War and Remembrence in condensed form and liked them so much I re-read them in their long form.

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    9. NICKY, you might not want to read Stephen King's Kujo.

      Janet

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    10. Great, Janet, now I want to read it. Did I mention that I am morbidly fascinated with things that frighten me? Hence me checking rabies books out of the library and studying everything there is to know about it (did you know that there was only 1 rabies case for humans in 2015?).

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    11. Nicky, did you know that rabies has been transmitted through organ donations? I believe it happened in Russia. In my previous life, I was "into" infectious diseases! :)

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  45. Mary Connealy, her lesser-known works are just as great as "Rebecca" but I don't think movies were made of any of them except "Rebecca". "My Cousin Rachel" is a fantastic psychological suspense novel long before the term was even used. I particularly loved "Jamaica Inn" and "Frenchman's Creek", in fact, "Frenchman's Creek" is my top favourite even over "Rebecca". :)

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    1. I just came home with Frenchman's Creek, Laurie! I can't wait to try it!!!

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    2. Laurie, I read all the du Maurier books in my youth. Wonder if I'd enjoy them as much now?

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  46. Laurie I'll check them out for sure. I'm going to the library (maybe) later today! Thanks for the great suggestion. You know, I think I KNEW she'd written other books. I just haven't read them. Frenchman's Creek and Jamaica Inn. I'm excited.

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  47. I should probably re-read the Harry Potter books. I'll admit by about book five I was majorly skimming.
    I just can't bear it.

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    1. I mean I can't bear to reread them all. :( I am sooooooooo not addicted to them, and many are.

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    2. Not so into Potter. Love the movies, however. Cheating. I know.

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  48. What a great post, Tina! Comfort reads . . . As far as devotions, I have read and re-read Streams in the Desert a number of times. In fact, just this morning, I was thinking it was time to pull that one out again. :)

    As for fiction, the Anne of Green Gables series. Loved those characters. Janette Oke's Love Comes Softly series is another one. I also really enjoy Susan May Warren's My Foolish Heart and Rachel Haucks' royals series. I think these are comfort reads for me because the characters resonate with who I was when I first read them. :) Also, they speak encouragement to me. And hope. And truth.

    What's on your comfort reads list, Tina? Or have you shared it above somewhere? :)

    Such a fun post!

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    1. I have such a long comfort read list I feel it would be unfair to list some and not all. They are like children.

      I have classics, and mysteries, suspense..and strange and unusual stuff on my list.

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  49. Hmm. . I have always loved The Blue Castle by Lucy Maud Montgomery. I just like it. Probably my Kristen Billerbeck novels. I have reread those often. What a fun topic to think on. Becky B/

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    1. Isn't it, Becky B. I love any Lucy Maud Montgomery too.

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  50. My favorite comfort read is Ella Enchanted which I've read like six times. However I also like Percy Jackson which I've read three or four times (depending on the book)

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    1. Ella Enchanted is quite good. Agree, Nicky.

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  51. Tina, you made me realize I haven't pulled out any books as comfort reads in a long time. Must go think on this!

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    1. Get with it, Tippens. A new home isn't home until you pull out your comfort reads. (BTW, I donated a ton to the library too. Broke my heart)

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  52. hi Tina
    as a youngster, my comfort book was The Giving Tree by Shel Silversteen. Teen years was Sherlock Holmes and short stories by Isaac Asimov. College years Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern series.
    With my son hitting reading age, I'm revisiting my favorite childhood books. He's not quite as riveted with books as I was.*sigh*

    lately, for my romance comfort fix - it's been Seekerville collections and your Rosetti Curse book. I adore the grandmas.

    Name in draw please. I need a cover for a pillow so my little guy doesn't keep stealing the one I like to use. Gotta mark something as mommy's. *heh*

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    1. Awww, DebH, I love Grandma Rosetti too.

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    2. Thank you, Mary Connealy. It is a favorite of mine too.

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  53. Tina, Louis L'Amour has a lot of great stories!

    I remember one of my sons getting in trouble while in tutoring for Spanish. He'd pretend to study Spanish while really reading Louis L'Amour. It wasn't too funny for him when he had to pay and take an online college Spanish course to make up for the class credit.

    As an adult, he does like to write.

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    1. I believe you, Connie. Mary Connealy has twisted my arm and some day I will read one of Louie's books. :)

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    2. Tina you MUST REMEMBER. Every single Louis Book (okay I can think of maybe three exceptions) are ROMANCE NOVELS!
      Men don't like admitting this.

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    3. All romance novels. My local library has a gazillion. Must check them out.

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    4. I need to read Louis! Maybe I'll ask Santa to stick one in my stocking. That is if I'm not too naughty! :)

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  54. I will add that moving made me reevaluate all my stock of books. We estimated that I gave away about 1500 books to the library before moving. It took 4 carloads (twice was my SUV) to take them all over there! The ones that are left are of course, books by my Seeker friends. And my favorite authors: the ones that always make me cry and say "Why can't I write like that?" :)

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    1. 1500 books? LOL wow, that's GOT to be a record, Missy. Good for you for sharing them that way!

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    2. I don't think that's a record. I think we are tied. After all, I had enough books in boxes to tilt my entire office so I couldn't close the door. Sometimes moving is a good thing.

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  55. TINA, I had not thought of "comfort" reads before. Reading itself is comforting especially while enjoying a cup of hot tea.

    Please enter me in the drawing.

    Have a TERRIFIC TUESDAY!

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    1. Reading is totally one of the top five blessings and comforts in life. We are blessed to have so many books.

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  56. "A good book has no ending".:

    Say What?

    Do you realize that this excludes every genre romance? I like, "A good book can be read over and over without ending."

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    1. What that means, Vince, is that the story lives on long after you close the book. That you are thinking of the H/H and their life together after you hit THE END. And in fact you want to send them a Christmas card this year.

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    2. Tina, I agree one hundred percent... The author haunts us with what could be... even as we close the cover. SIGH.....

      Now that's a good book!!!!

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    3. Hi Tina: that could also mean that there were too many loose ends to really know how the story turns out. Besides a bad book can have very memorable characters that haunt you far into the future! And as much as I like Jack Reacher, I've never had the urge to send him a Christmas card.

      Granted, while you make a good point, I still like the idea that you can keep reading a good book over and over again and still enjoy and get satisfaction with each rereading. But then, we're only talking about good books. There are still the better books and the best books to define. : )

      P.S. Good books never end. Better books transcend endings whether they have one or not. The best books enter your soul and become a part of you forever.

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    4. "Bad books seem like they are never going to end."

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  57. My current comfort reads are of a different ilk... Max Lucado's "The Crippled Lamb" and The Berenstain Bears and The Spooky Old Tree and When a Monster is Born.... which is a crowd-pleasing favorite. :)

    It's a different brand of comfort for certain!!!!

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    1. I love your current comfort reads. I have a couple of those on my own bookshelves. :)

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    2. Ruthy I think I got The Crippled Lamb for my daughter last year (for the grandbabies) but you've given me two new suggestions.

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  58. Paying homage to Tina's blog post, I just got back from the local library.
    I got two books we've talked about here, today. Frenchman's Creek by Daphne du Maurier and a Louis L'Amour. I also got some new sweat socks and a thermal shirt which I now see if two sizes too big. So I'll return the shirt and take comfort in the socks.

    And a cup of Earl Grey tea. It's actually a really nice warm day.

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    1. I wish my library carried socks and shirts. Life would be pretty much perfect.

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    2. Clearly I need an editor. I have modified the wrong past participle. I may need to see a doctor and reverse the modification. That sometimes takes minor surgery once it's happened.
      But it is so easily preventable!!!

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    3. Mary: Will you share which L'Amour book you came home with? Come to think of it, "Conagher" would make a nice comfort read.

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    4. Vince, I got Reilly's Luck, the one suggested by Connie. I've read it (I've read them ALL probably almost all multiple times. Certainly MANY of them multiple times. But the book blurb she gave sounded familiar but I decided to hunt it up and read it again.
      I'm a HUGE Conagher fan.
      Probably the one I've read the most, except maybe for FLINT! Is Sackett Brand. Where Tell Sackett is hunted by 40 men in the Mogollen Rim. And all the Sacketts come a'runnin'.

      Best line in the book, one Sackett meets another and says, "I heard Tell Sackett's treed in the Mogollens by 40 men."
      "Let's go and go fast, before he gets them all himself."

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  59. My comfort reads are children's classics. Maybe that's embarrassing. :) But rereading Anne of Green Gables series, Little Women etc nothing beats that for me.

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    1. Not embarrassing at all! PailofPearls, I would be worried if you said The Brothers Grimm. Now those were just plain terrifying.

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  60. I am sorry I'm so late to the party! I have several comfort reads and my husband doesn't understand how I can read the same books over and over. One of my favorites is The Secret Garden. Great post!

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    1. Secret Garden got three votes today. Excellent choice. My husband is not a rereader either.

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    2. Oh My Gosh, The Secret Garden! Best book ever. I wonder if my daughter has that for her daughter yet.

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  61. I do have a few comfort reads! Of course the Bible is the biggest one.

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  62. I love reading my comfort reads over and over! They are ones where I feel completely part of the story as it comes to life in my mind, even after I've finished reading. My long-time favorites have been These Happy Golden Years by Laura Ingalls Wilder, The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare, The Long Way Down by Robb White, The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier. My current comfort read is Edenbrooke by Julianne Donaldson... I've lost count of how many times I've read it! I'd love to be entered in the giveaway! :)

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    1. Excellent choices. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. I haven't thought of that book in years. You are entered, Heidi.

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    2. Heidi, I really like Edenbrooke, but I haven't read it in a while. That is something I should remedy.

      I had to read The Witch of Blackbird Pond for school, but just because I had to read it for school doesn't mean that I didn't thoroughly enjoy it.

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  63. Way late coming in today and way too many comments to read. I'm sure they would all be interesting. I think my comfort reads right now are the Guideposts book series. They are fun mysteries and have characters that feel like people I might have as friends.

    Please enter me in the drawing.

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    1. Sandy, do you buy them or check them out at your library. How do you access that series.

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  64. Tina, This might be a long response. Books are one of my favorite things period. From my kids' shelves with Shel Silverstein, Poppleton in Fall by Cynthia Ryland and of course, Dr. Seuss, I'm very fortunate that if I want to read to my twins, that's usually comforting in and of itself. As far as books that are my comfort reads, it depends on my mood. Jennifer Crusie if I want a good laugh. A Tommy and Tuppence mystery by Agatha Christie if I want to get enthralled in a mystery. Anne of Green Gables anytime because that brook will always run by Rachel Lynde's house. I also love the Story of the Von Trapp Family Singers because that story is timeless. As previously mentioned, Happy Hollisters or Trixie Belden if I'm feeling nostalgic. And I also love biographies of classic movie stars or coffee table books about them. I'm so fortunate there are so many great books waiting for discovery as well. Sigh, this is the tip of the iceberg.

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    1. YES!!! This is the bottom line. A comfort read for whatever rabbit hole you want to go down. You nailed it, Tanya.

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  65. Thankful for comfort reads. Great post, Tina! I've reread a few Irene Hannon sweet romances. Oh, The Places You'll Go! by Dr. Seuss is a favorite, too.

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    1. Okay, now you are in trouble. You disappeared. I love Irene too.

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  66. Lovely post, Tina! I really appreciate the Stephen King quote. The only book I've read more than once (for me) is To Kill a Mockingbird. I wore out my first and second copies, so am now on my third -- all three books are side by side on my bookshelf. I like to read it every other year, and I always come away with something new from the story.

    Looking forward to reading comments and finding some new-to-me books Seekervillagers mention.

    Nancy C

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  67. Now I for sure have to find myself another copy of TKAMB. How do you like that for an acronym, Nancy!

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  68. Ah, Nancy! To Kill a Mockingbird. So perfect.
    And another....A Lantern In Her Hand by Bess Streeter Aldrich. Powerful, beautiful book. But I cry too much.

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  69. My comfort read is The Hobbit, though I haven't read it recently.

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    1. Another Hobbiter! Interesting comfort read.

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  70. Tina, you asked how I get the Guideposts series to read. I have gotten many of them from a friend who has written for them. I started the Mysteries of Marble Cove series that way. There were 24 books in the series and I was given the first 10. I called Guideposts and they sent out the rest of the series one month at a time until the final book. I am so excited because they have a two volume, four book Christmas series. I really enjoyed the characters so looking forward to reading it again. I have also received books from another series from my friend and have gotten others through inter-library loan as our library doesn't carry them.

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  71. Oh yes, Tina...
    Love this...

    One of my favorites is Quiet Talks on Prayer. Another is The Hiding Place. Ahhhh.

    I'm always humbled when someone tells me they've read one of mine more than once. Perhaps they're taking King's quote to heart. :)

    Sorry to be late. Internet has been spotty until yesterday afternoon. Trying to catch up!!!

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  72. Glad to see you, May and KC!!! Thank you!!!

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  73. Tina,

    When I began reading your post, I actually remembered a book from my childhood titled "Home for a Bunny." I read that book so much that I wore it out and my mom had to find and purchase another one for me. These days, with so much going on, the Bible is the one book that brings me true comfort.

    Please enter me in the drawing!

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  74. I've never really heard of a "comfort read", but it's got my name all over it. As a reader, I anticipate the interaction of a good book...joining with the main characters and breathing all the angst that comes her way. Great topic. Thanks!

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  75. I tend to fall back on certain retellings of fairy tales from . . . middle school? Beauty (the best version of Beauty and the Beast out there) and Spindle's End (Sleeping Beauty) by Robin McKinley are still among my favorites. Even though I could just about quote the books from memory, I still reread them every couple years.

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