Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Amish Tidbits

with guest Molly Jebber.

Research can be fun . . . 

You’ve picked your location for your story. You researched the entertainment, appearance, stores, and unique way of life there. Maybe you visited and talked to the people to learn more about the location’s history. That’s what I do to learn about the Amish.

I write Amish Historical Romance. Their history, faith in God, traditions, and lifestyle are all interesting to me. The Amish and I share the same faith in God. The difference is our lifestyles. I wear makeup, like to shop, drive a car, use a blow dryer and curling iron, love to listen to musicals, and enjoy many things the outside world has to offer that they avoid. 

The Amish and Mennonites believe baptism should be an adult choice, and they reject infant baptism. They were once known as Anabaptists. Mainstream Protestants and Catholic authorities persecuted the Anabaptists in the 1550’s. They were beheaded, burned at the stake, tortured and thrown in dungeons for believing this way in their faith.

Jakob Ammann felt the Mennonites were too lenient in church discipline and in accepting more conveniences and comforts into their lives. He led the Amish to Pennsylvania away from persecution, and the word, “Amish” derived from his last name. They thrived and still do today.

  They and I believe in John 3:16. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” 

King James Version

The Old Order Amish use the King James Version of the Holy Bible written in German or English. Their main language is Pennsylvania Dutch.

The community agrees and lives by a list of rules called the Ornung. The colors approved for women’s skirts and dresses and men’s shirts and pants, resolving disputes among themselves, etc. are all adhered to as agreed upon by the bishop and elders.



Dolls don’t have faces. They don’t want their children wanting to look like the dolls to avoid “graven images” and pride. The dolls are soft and cuddly.  


They use propane gas, wood burning stoves, and oil lanterns for cooking and light.  

Children attend school through the eighth grade. They are needed to work on the farm, and Old Order Amish don’t feel it is necessary for their lifestyle. 

Children play soccer, ride bicycles, fish, and hunt to name a few fun activities. The Amish have large community meals together to socialize. They take care of the widows and aged, and they financially support those suffering from sickness, a fire, etc. 

They will go to doctors, clinics, and hospitals. They do give and accept blood. 

They drive horse-drawn buggies or wagons for transportation. They will accept rides from Englischers, and they will travel by boat or train for long distances.
The Old Order Amish strive to do God’s will in their lives. They avoid confrontation, violence, and strife. I travel often to their communities and find the women kind and compassionate. They are so talented. Their food is delicious.

 Quilts are made with perfect stitches and beautiful patterns. Jellies, jams, baked goods, and many dry goods are amazing. The craftsmanship in their furniture is near perfect. I enjoy it all! They strive to do God’s will in all they do, and to forgive others, no matter how difficult the circumstances. I have been blessed by the Amish. If you have a chance, visit an Amish community and enjoy all the good food and dry goods! Here’s a potholder I bought.  
        
  
My Keepsake Pocket Quilt Series (Change of Heart, 1899 and Grace’s Forgiveness, 1900; and Two Suitors for Anna, 1903) takes place in Berlin, Ohio. In each one, someone receives a quilt with a pocket sewn on it and a letter tucked inside. 

Two Suitors for Anna releases in stores and ebook TODAY, January 31, 2017. Thanks for celebrating with me!

Have you visited Amish Country? What were your thoughts? Did you go home with an Amish homemade item? 




Anna hesitates when Noah proposes marriage and insists they move to another Amish community to meet new people and experience a new location. He takes her hesitation as rejection and leaves. Daniel comes to town and offers Anna friendship, and they fall in love. Noah returns, and he asks Anna for forgiveness and another chance. She’s torn. Who will she choose? Who will you root for?

Today Molly is generously giving away two copies of Two Suitors for Anna. Two winners! Be sure to comment! Winners announced in the Weekend Edition



MollyJebber has just signed a four-book contract for a new Amish Bakery Series with the first story taking place in 1912 coming soon. 

Please visit her website: http://www.mollyjebber.com for a complete list of where she’ll be speaking for Women’s Christian Connection, and other groups about the Amish and my books or where she’ll be offering classes on marketing, publishing, and writing. Enjoy watching her book video about Two Suitors for Anna

Her books are listed with links to buy them in print or Ebook in stores and online.

88 comments :

  1. Welcome Molly! Oh I so love Amish fiction, I have Beverly Lewis to thank for that. She was the first author I had read in this genre when I was searching to expand my Christian fiction palate! I've only learned about the Amish & Mennonite lifestyle through fiction, trusting the author to have authentic details. I bet it's a lot of fun do to your research with actual Amish folks!! I don't live anywhere near a community like that, but if I were to visit one, I think the first place would be a market where I could peruse the aisles for the food stuffs. Jams, jellies, apple butter, canned vegetables & fruit,etc. I'm making myself hungry thinking about it...lol! I also love seeing the Amish made quilts and furniture. You know you're getting well crafted things that will last a lifetime by buying those. :-)

    What a wunderbar post! It's been a while since I've read an Amish fiction book, but I have one coming up in my TBR pile called "The Seekers" by Wanda Brunstetter. Can't wait to read it!

    I had won an autographed copy of "Change of Heart" from you on a blog quite a while ago & I'd sure love to add this one to the collection. Please put my name in the Amish cap to win a copy of Two Suitors for Anna. I'm curious who she chooses :-)

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    1. Hi Trixie, Thank you for your kind words. Readers like you inspire and encourage me. The research is fun, and the Amish and Mennonite people have been so wonderful to me. I appreciate your message and your hat is in the ring for a chance to win Two Suitors for Anna!

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  2. Molly! Welcome to Seekerville. Delighted to have you here with us.

    I've brought out the jam and fresh bread (warm) for today!

    I can't tell you how delighted I am to see Kensington Publishing releasing Amish Fiction. Wonderful news. They are a wonderful publishing house and I know you are enjoying working with them.

    My memories of the Amish of Western New York include visiting a home for quilt shopping.

    They brought us to a room with a double bed stacked high with quilts. And I mean HIGH. One woman stood on each side and they drew back a quilt, over and over so we could look at them until we found the one we wanted to purchase.

    Such quality and craftsmanship. Such memories!

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    1. Hi Tina!
      Thank you for inviting me to Seekerville. I enjoy this site and all the helpful and interesting information posted, so I'm honored to be here today.

      Kensington has a "Kensington Bouquet" in house line where they are working to enhance Amish inspirational books. They are wonderful to work with.

      Oh, I love the handcrafted items. We bought a dining room table and chairs made by the Amish. It wasn't fancy, but the workmanship was perfect. We enjoyed the set for a long time. Our kids have it now!

      I bought a quilt at an Amish auction. It had been in the Amish family for generations (over 100 years old). It's a patchwork quilt with flour sack backing. So soft and the stitches are straight and tiny. I take it with me to events to share it with my readers. I never tire from visiting their communities.

      Thank you, again, Tina, for all your help, and for our "visit"!

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    2. The quilt sounds amazing! My sister is a quilter and would love to see something like that.

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  3. Hi Molly:

    I've enjoyed all the Amish romances I've read. Most were Contemporary. Yet I've never read an Amish Christmas romance. I see you've written one. Would please tell us how the Amish celebrate Christmas?

    Also, I hear there is a resort town in Florida for Amish and Mennonites to vacation. Do you live near that town? It might be fun to go there, too. Please include me in the drawing.

    Vince

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    1. Christmas - The Amish Christmas Sleigh has three stories by me, Amy Lillard, and Kelly Irwin. The Old Order Amish don't have a Christmas tree, fancy gifts or wrapping paper. They craft handmade useful handmade furniture, towels, etc. for gifts. Children - blocks, books, puzzles, etc. They pray and thank God for all He's done for them, they enjoy a meal, and read the story of Jesus Christ's birth.

      Pinecraft, Sarasota is not far from where I spend the winter. I love it! The small town is filled with Amish and Mennonites during their vacation time. Food is good, and the people are so kind.

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    2. I've read an Amish book where they go to FL for vacation, and I was so surprised! I never thought of them vacationing. :)

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    3. One of my Amish coworkers is a Pinecraft snowbird. She goes down in December & works through the winter & then comes back to Northern Indiana in the spring once the snow ends.

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    4. Hi Becky:

      Thank you: The "Snowbird" Amish. That's worth a book in itself. Now I really must visit Pinecraft. Vince

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    5. Hi Missy:

      If you can remember that book title, I'll buy and read it. Vince

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  4. I would love to visit Amish country. In the meantime I will enjoy the stories.

    Count me in thank you.

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    1. Hi Mary,

      You are in the drawing! Thank you for visiting, and it's always good to hear when readers enjoy Amish stories. Thank you!

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  5. Thank you for the great post about the Amish Molly. I live in Northeast Indiana, so I see the Amish quite often. I've also been to Shipshewana several times which has a lot of Amish farms in the area. I have gone to an Amish farm that has converted part of it into a restaurant. The ladies there make you feel like you are in their home and they are treating you just like friends and family. One of our good friends son married a girl who was raised in the Amish faith but chose to leave during Rumspringa. Their reception was totally catered by the Amish of her family's community. Oh. My. The food was wonderful and Amish peanut butter....I could eat it every day and never get tired of it. I love it.

    I would love to win one of your books. Thank you for the chance.

    Blessings,
    Cindy W.

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    1. Hi Cindy,

      I love visiting Shipshewana. I enjoyed your post. Their peanut butter is sooooo good. I enjoy the tours of the Amish farms, and they are so generous with their time and information. Thank you for visiting today!

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    3. Did someone mention peanut butter??? Oh my, my favorite food in the world...I'm crazy about it! What makes Amish peanut butter more special, is it because of how they make it...you, know homemade?? Now I know I need to put visiting an Amish community higher on my list of places to visit :-)

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  6. Welcome, Molly! I enjoyed learning more about the Amish. As a child, I remember visiting Lancaster, PA and was fascinated by the Amish people. I begged my father for a horse and buggy. Thanks for visiting today.

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    1. Hi Jill,

      I loved your comment about asking your father for a horse and buggy! My niece once asked her father for a horse, and they lived in a community with houses not too far apart with small yards. He told her it was against to the law. She'd have to get permission from the Mayor. She called the Mayor. He promptly called her father and said, "What is this I hear about a horse?" We've laughed about that for years.

      Lancaster, PA is the one place I haven't been and I can't wait to go. I've been too many other Amish communities, and that one is on my list!

      Thank you for visiting me!

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  7. Welcome to Seekerville, Molly! My home in Kentucky was framed by Amish men. Builders love to hire the Amish even though they don't live very close. I know men who drive to Amish country, like Crab Orchard, to pick men up and drive them to work. The men framing our house took a few days off because they heard of a buggy for sale in PA. Somehow they got a ride to PA to check out the buggy and bought it and got it back to KY. I don't know how they communicated and worked out the logistics, but they did it. They are fascinating and seem to be hard workers.
    Thanks for sharing today!

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    1. Hi Jackie,

      The Amish are resourceful. I loved your post about the Amish building your house! Thank you for sharing your story! The Amish will pay "us" to provide transport of them or something they buy from a distance. It's acceptable, as long as they are not the ones doing the driving. Just a guess, but maybe that's how they got the buggy back to KY. Thank you so much for visiting me. I really did enjoy your post!

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  8. Good morning Molly!

    What about law enforcement? If an Amish person stole from another, would the elders handle the problem w/in or turn them over to the police? What about more serious crimes.

    I'd think the Amish would have a low crime rate.

    Thanks for being in Seekerville today.

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    1. Hi Connie, The Amish won't report crimes among themselves. They handle it. If it is a serious crime, the police insist on being involved. Amish avoid violence or confrontation. Their crime rate is low.

      Thank you for visiting!

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  9. MOLLY, welcome to Seekerville. Congratulations on your new release Two Suiters for Anna. Readers love Amish stories. Debby is writing Amish Suspense.

    Thanks for sharing the interesting tidbits on the Amish! How do you differentiate Amish lifestyle from "English" farmers who live simply too?

    Janet

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    1. Hi Janet,

      The Old Order Amish farmers won't use ANY worldly equipment, no matter how labor intensive the work. They don't have trucks with trailers or electricity. They do have a close knit community full of help when they need it. Some English farmers have this too, but the Amish seem to have a special bond.

      Thank you for asking the question. Thank you for visiting!

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  10. Good morning MOLLY,
    This was interesting. I don't write Amish but I read it. I think it's something you can't fake, you have to have a real heart for the genre. It is a fascinating culture. I have avoided going to Lancaster so far because I don't want to gawk and make people feel like they are in a fish bowl, although they can probably cope quite nicely. I just finished one of Debby's books, "Plain Truth," and learned a lot about the childhood enzyme disease.
    I also enjoy reading about the Mennonites and the Shakers. I grew up near a Shaker community in Canterbury, N.H., and was privileged to meet three of the last surviving Shakers from that colony. All women, of course.
    I'm intrigued by "historical" Amish fiction because in earlier times, "plain" and "fancy" weren't that different on the outside. Most women wore long dresses and cooked on wood stoves and rode in buggies, so the details separating the two cultures have to be finer.
    Would love to be entered in the drawing.
    Kathy Bailey

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    1. Hi Kathy,

      In the Amish Historical Romance books I write, I enjoy including tidbits from the time period.

      Example: In "Change of Heart", President McKinley was born in Massillon, Ohio, and I include him in the story.

      I interview women who are in their nineties, and they tell me stories about their lives and the lives of their parents. I learn so much, and I enjoy them. It's such a blessing the women are willing to share and help me with this information.

      They tell me about using a heavy iron heated over the fire and using a potholder to iron their clothes. Fun facts I can use that we may not be familiar with as we use all our modern conveniences. It's fun and keeps me learning new facts!

      Thank you for visiting and asking your question.

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    2. Hi Kaybee! Thanks for mentioning PLAIN TRUTH! I enjoyed researching the story. The medical community is learning a great deal from Amish families in regard to certain diseases. Anything medical gets my attention. :)

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  11. Good Morning Molly. Thanks so much for this interesting post. I would have to admit that Amish isn't my favorite genre, but I do enjoy it from time to time. I grew up very near an Amish community and like remembering the things they would do. I remember playing a softball game against an Amish school and all the girls wore dresses and kapps. Didn't hold them back at all. I think they beat us! I have a question. With all the different sects and orders of Amish, how difficult is is to write an Amish book? I am thinking that no matter how well you research, someone out there will take issue with you, saying something is incorrect because the sect they are familiar with isn't quite the same. I really respect the authors that take this on, because so many people love to read Amish.

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    1. Hi Cindy,

      I write Amish Historical Romance, and my books center around the Old Order Amish in the late 1800's and early 1900's.

      I do stick close to their lifestyle and tradition, but they are stories of fiction, and I do bring trouble to my characters lives.

      I enjoy writing the stories, and I'm relieved and fortunate to have readers who have inspired and encouraged me along the way and still do. You are right, it was scary the first time my publisher put "Change of Heart", my first book on the shelf. Thankfully, it was well received. I can't say enough about how much I appreciate and value my supportive readers.

      Thank you for your post!

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  12. Molly, thanks for being here today. I don't write Amish but I think it's lovely that folks are flocking to sweet stories of an intriguing and separate group of congregations. And if there's a bakery involved, I'm in!!!

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    1. You're so kind, Ruth! Thank you! I'm working on my first book in my bakery series now. Sometimes I get hungry writing it with all the goodies I'm talking about. Not good for my waistline!! LOL

      Thank you for visiting!

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    2. I agree, any book with a bakery is on my wish list on Amazon!

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  13. Welcome, MOLLY!

    I so enjoyed your glimpse into Amish life. I learned some things I didn't know. I've always wanted to visit an Amish community; we have a small Amish group about an hour from where I live in the Ozarks, and though I've visited in their area, I haven't really met anyone from the group. Would love to! Would also love to visit Pennsylvania one day. Though I don't write Amish fiction, I'd like to learn more about the culture, as I'm fascinated by their lifestyle.

    I recently watched an old movie classic on TCM called Friendly Persuasion. Have you ever seen it? It's about a Quaker family whose son joins the war. I won't spoil it for you, but this movie classic buff found it interesting. :-) And though the family's not Amish,it brought to mind how we can respect others, though we might view life through a different lens.

    CONGRATS on your new release and your new series ~ Looking forward to reading!

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    1. Hi Cynthia,

      I did see the previews for the movie. I haven't watched it yet. It did capture my interest. You're right, I've learned through researching the Amish that I have put some of my preconceived notions aside about not just the Amish but other people's views on a lot of things.

      Thank you so much! I appreciate your post!

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    2. I learned a lot from this post as well, Cynthia.

      So glad Molly shared with us.

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  14. Hi Molly, Thank you so much for joining us here today in Seekerville. What a wealth of information you have shared about the Amish. Your new release sounds exciting.

    We drove through Amish country in our motorhome and I was scared to death we were going to hit a horse and buggy on those narrow country roads. We didn't stop to buy anything because there was nowhere to park our motorhome. Beautiful country though. And always interesting to see different lifestyles. We have such diversity here in the US.

    Thanks again for joining us. Have fun today.

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    1. Hi Sandra,

      Thank you for sharing your story with me. I appreciate you stopping by!

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  15. I visited Pinecraft two years ago. It was quite interesting, I loved all the tricycles, What shocked me the most was seeing an amish girl with a cell phone. I would have loved to buy a doll but did not have the money for it at that time. It took all I had to make the trip. I did have a piece of Shoofly pie and it was awesome!

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    1. The Mennonites dress like the Amish although they may wear lighter colored dresses. They use cell phones.

      Shoofly pie - love it!!

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  16. I keep hearing about Pinecraft and now it's on my bucket list.

    Shoofly pie???? Had to look that one up!

    Shoofly pie is a molasses pie considered traditional among the Pennsylvania Dutch and is called Melassichriwwelkuche in Pennsylvania Dutch. The pie may get its name because the sweet molasses odor attracts flies that must be "shooed" away.

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  17. Molly, I love this article.
    I've been to Amish Country.
    I was in Ohio. I flew into Canton, OH.
    I'm blank on all the names. I stayed in an Amish bed and breakfast, the couple who ran it, the husband grew up Amish.
    I remember great food, some confusion at a huge Amish restaurant how the reconciled the Amish and the electricity. The waitresses were Amish, or costumed like they were.
    What I remember vividly is I talked with at least FIVE people in different situations, about the Amish. Every one of them told me about the Amish, 'this is how it really is.' and each one of them said things completely differently.
    Which amused me.

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    1. The different types of Amish communities can be confusing. The Old Order Amish are the most strict. The rest of the Amish orders allow just a few things different from the others. It may be the color of dresses the women wear, such as a light color instead of dark colors. Subtle changes. They still stay with their core beliefs. It's interesting and fun to research.

      Thank you for stopping by!

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    2. Schwartzentuber, right? :) Spelling doubtful.

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  18. I also was struck by the horse and buggies.
    The first day I'm like, "Wow, weird."
    The next couple of days, I'm all, "This is charming, following them on the road, life is slowing down, lovely."
    The last day or two, "Get off the road!"

    I suspect if I stayed longer, I'd have adapted.

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    1. I'm always afraid they'll get hit by a car! Some of the roads are narrow to get around the buggies and horses.

      When I rode in a buggy, the Amish man said it gets cold in the winter but they have big wool blankets to keep them warm. I can't imagine! It was quite a bumpy ride too!

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  19. I've been looking at a map near Canton and just cannot remember where I was. What town.
    There was a huge cheese factory. Free samples.

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  20. I've been googling and cannot find the places I was. I am ashamed of myself. My thinker is sore now.
    :)
    So nice to have you here today, Molly. Despite my inability to remember details, you've awakened so fond memories.

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    1. Maybe you visited Berlin? Middlebury? Mt. Hope? or Sugarcreek? They are not too far apart and all around the Canton area. They are my favorite communities to visit!

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  21. MOLLY!!! Welcome to Seekerville -- it's good to see you here!

    And, WOW, did you educate me on the Amish, my friend -- so many things I never knew!

    The closest I have come to Amish is going to dinner at an home in an Amish community close to Lake of the Ozarks. The food was delicious and the entire experience was fascinating. But we went during the dog days of summer, so two of the main things I remember was that there was no air-conditioning and my iced tea had no ice. ;) But it was really fun to go and see how the Amish live.

    We now live in at the Lake, so it's not uncommon to see Amish families in McDonald's or Subway, something that still fascinates me. :)

    Hugs,
    Julie

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    1. Thank you, Julie! I'm enjoying the comments and my visit!

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  22. Good morning Molly. Enjoyed all your nuggets of info about the Amish!!

    Sometime in the 1980's the Amish settled in the little Ozark community where my grandpa had a farm. I had the privilege of meeting a sweet Amish woman. She and her family have remained friends for more than twenty years. They also sell sorghum which I can't find in California, so they ship it to me. Their Gooseberry Jam is delicious and I LOVE their Apple Butter!! Reading through their community cookbook is delightful since I recognize some of the names and know where their farms are.

    The Amish family that purchased my grandfather's farm are always gracious and lets us take photos of the rock-hipped roof barn my grandpa built. Last time we were there they showed us the inside of the house and the revisions they'd made. We had a good laugh about the steep stairs and how the Amish father tore them out and changed the angle after his daughter had tumbled down them!

    Our family also had a good chuckle about the outhouse! My grandpa didn't install an indoor toilet until 1976. He just left the outhouse where it was. When the Amish bought the farm, they tore out the indoor facilities and resurrected the outhouse we all remembered so fondly!!

    I have found this particular family to be friendly, fun and willing to answer any questions I've had about their different beliefs and lifestyles. They are down to earth and often quite romantic in their expressions. It's a joy to know them!

    I'd love to be entered in the drawing for your book. My mother and sister-in-law and I always appreciate a good Amish story!

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    1. Hi Kathryn, I loved reading your post and story about your grandfather and the Amish family! Thank you for sharing it with me.

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  23. Thank you Molly and congratulations on your new book deal! May God bless you and all of Seekerville!

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    1. Thank you, Phyllis, and may God bless you too. Thank you for stopping by!

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  24. A great post about everything Amish! Sad to say I haven't read too many Amish stories and have never visited the Amish. Congratulations on your 4-book contract!! How exciting!

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    1. Thank you, Sally, for the good wishes and for stopping by today!

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  25. Molly, thanks for being with us today! I loved reading your post. I enjoy the Amish as well. Good people. So hard working.

    I've lived near Amish communities in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Have also visited an Old Order Amish community in TN that was a bit different. Each community has their own ways of doing things as you mentioned in the blog.

    I sent the second book in my new Amish Protectors series, titled UNDERCOVER AMISH, to my editor yesterday. Hubby said he could hear the clip-clop of horses hooves coming from my office with all the Amish buggies I had running through the pages of my story. :) Those horses and their buggies are now in NYC!

    I'm hoping to visit Pinecraft in the not-too-distant future. Any suggestions for what I need to see, places to visit, restaurants, etc?

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    1. Hi Debbie,

      I loved your comment about the horses and buggies clip clopping. I can relate. LOL

      Pinecraft is a really small town but their restaurant is amazing, and if the Amish and Mennonite vacationers are there, it's busier with gatherings at the park. They do have an Amish furniture store and gift shop.
      Sarasota has a beautiful beach, shopping, and Circus museum.

      So good of you to stop by. Thank you!

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  26. Buggies in NYC! Now that's a little Rhinestone Cowboy, Debby! I can't wait.

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    1. Laughing, Tina. The buggies are on the pages of my manuscript now on my editor's desk. The story does not involve NYC Amish. Although that would be interesting! :)

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  27. Glad to have you as our guest today, Molly! There are many tidbits here I hadn't come across before--thanks! Not that I feel any closer to writing an Amish story. There's still too much I don't know, and I freely admit it!

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  28. Molly, Loved reading your post. I've visited Amish country in Pennsylvania and Ohio. We brought back noodles and jams and enjoyed them. My MIL has several Amish dolls, and I remember asking her about them after I met my husband and she explained about why they did not have faces sewn on. Congratulations on your new book contract.

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    1. I love the dolls! Thank you for your kind words!

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  29. Congratulations Molly, I am sure your new book will be a wonderful read. My husband and I often drive to Miller's near because they have wonderful food products. I have never had the pleasure of visiting some of the larger Amish settlements that are tourist attractions but I have visited several Amish homes in both PA and KY. Our rural area in Kentucky is now home to many Amish families and I consider them friends!
    Connie
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. I meant to say Miller's Bakery and Furniture near West Union, Ohio.
      Blessings!
      Connie
      cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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    2. Thank you, Connie. I have Pennsylvania on my list. I'm partial to the Amish communities in Ohio and visit them often. Thank you for visiting me today!

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  30. Molly, my question wasn't clear. I write Americana set in late 1800s when farmers didn't have modern conveniences so the English and Amish farmers lived much the same. I was wondering how you differentiate them.

    Writing historical novels requires a lot of research. Writing Amish fiction must take even more. I'm impressed. We live near Amish. I'm impressed with their talent and work ethic.

    Janet

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    1. I'm sorry, Janet. I did misunderstand. in the 1800's, there wasn't much difference, except the Amish would not work on Sundays.

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  31. Molly....I meant to ask in my original post what that was a picture of?? It looks like a bat clinging to a rafter. Or some kind of animal at the bottom of a well....I just can't tell.

    And someone mentioned peanut butter....only my most favorite food in the entire world!!! What makes the Amish kind more special?? I'm guessing it's how they make it (homemade of course). If I ever get the chance to visit an Amish community, I'm seeking out a jar or while case of peanut butter...lol!!

    The other question, Englisher's such as myself, are they able to visit the more Old Order Amish? I know they are more strict than some that have split off from there. Old Order seems to be more strict when it come a to worldly things and people. I've always been curious about this :-) Thanks for indulging my questions! I've long been fascinated by their lifestyle and think we can learn an awful lot from them.

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    1. Hi Trixi,

      I appreciate your questions, and thank you for asking them. The picture above is a dungeon where in the 1550's, the Amish were kept in them for punishment because they believed in God and adult baptism. This is just one example of the types of punishment they endured.

      Old Order Amish are strict. They are kind, but they are more to themselves. The other Orders of Amish are more open to visitors and tours of their farms.

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    2. There may be Old Order Amish inviting visitors for tours, but fewer than the other Orders.

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    3. Oh my, how terrible!! Talk about religious persecution, I can't even imagine what it would have been like to endure this kind of punishment!

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  32. For ten years my English curriculum was one written by Mennonites and so I am familiar with the Anabaptist past you wrote about. Living in Ohio I have gone to visit many towns which were predominately Amish. For instance the town of Berlin where we went to go pick up our puppy was predominantly Amish (actually we bought our dog from an Amish man). My mom has several Amish souvenirs from faceless dolls to little patches of quilts.

    No need to enter me for your book. My mom already owns it.

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    1. Thank your Mom for me. You made my day finding out she owns it. So interesting to learn your curriculum was written by Mennonites! Thank you for sharing this!

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  33. Welcome, Molly! Thanks for sharing the tidbits today. I find the Amish very interesting. I look forward to checking out your new book!

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    1. Thank you, Missy! I really appreciate it!

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  34. Molly, I am so impressed with how knowledgeable you are about your topic. All research or do you have friends who are Amish?

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  35. Thanks for visiting Seekerville today and sharing all your knowledge about the Amish. So interesting!

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  36. I have never been to Amish country. The only time I've ever seen an Amish person was on a trip to D.C. a few decades ago. However, the historian in me loves learning new facts.

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  37. Thanks, Molly! This was such an interesting and educational post! Congratulations on your new four-book contract!!

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  38. Molly, I love your cover! Wishing you all the best!!

    Janet

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  39. A question I have asked several times and never heard an answer. If the Amish believe "the way I do", why can one read a complete book and never find the name of Jesus? Why are there no references to specific scripture such as John 3:16. I have yet to find an Amish title that is salvation by grace, not works. Thanks.

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  40. I have not visited Amish country. I love quilts and homemade gifts.

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  41. Thank you for sharing your expertise, Molly. I would love to be included in the drawing.

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