Monday, April 10, 2017

5 Ways to Create Passion in Your Story

by Guest DiAnn Mills



Readers are looking for an intense experience that whisks them away into our character’s world. No longer do they want to read about a character on a journey; they crave to be that person. Readers must be passionately involved with every breath, thought, word, and action in our stories. When readers are disappointed in a writer’s inability to create this world for them, they toss the book aside. And they may never read another word of ours again.

Writers, we can’t let this happen.

“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” ― William Wordsworth



How can we ensure our readers have the adventure they deserve?

The writer must have passion for the story.
Only when a story robs us of our sleeping hours and keeps us in a fog during the day can we begin the process. Until then, the words are merely taking refuge on paper.

The writer must spend time getting to know the character.
Prewriting our novels takes time, thought, and lots of mental exhaustion. Ask questions, research, interview, and probe through the forbidden dark places of your character’s mind. Sometimes those places come from our own minds. Use the one fear that stalks them to show character growth and change. Know the character’s backstory as it effects the story. If it doesn’t matter to the character, it won’t matter to the reader.

“First, find out what your hero wants, then just follow him!”
– Ray Bradbury

The writer must create from her own personal pain.
For readers to feel anger, happiness, sadness, fear, contempt, disgust, and loneliness, we must rip the scars off our hearts and write authentically. Be that character no matter how foreign the experience. Emotions in conflict add tension to every line of story. Slam your character into a corner, watch her squirm and fight her way out.

The writer is convinced her character plays the perfect role.
Only your character can be the one to tread where no one has gone before. Only your character has the past, flaws, weaknesses, victories, goals, and determination to ensure the story ripples with emotion. We all experience life in a different manner, and your character’s inner and outer expressions have to coincide with how she perceives each moment of story.




The writer must select the exact point of view.
This tip is twofold.
1. The deeper the POV, the more the reader can identify with the character. 2. Every time we change point of views, we are asking the reader to step out of the character’s closet, undress, and dress again in the new character’s POV. How many times is that transition necessary for our story? How often will readers move their passion to another character?

Passion wraps its arm around emotion, and within that depth of writing, the writer can provide an adventure that ripples with credibility and unexpected happenings.

How do you create passion in your story?

****
DiAnn will be giving away a copy of Deep Extraction today! Please let us know in the comments if you'd like to be entered. Winner will be announced in the weekend edition.


DiAnn Mills is a bestselling author who believes her readers should expect an adventure. She creates action-packed, suspense-filled novels to thrill readers. Her titles have appeared on the CBA and ECPA bestseller lists; won two Christy Awards; and been finalists for the RITA, Daphne Du Maurier, Inspirational ReadersChoice, and Carol award contests. Library Journal presented her with a Best Books 2014: Genre Fiction award in the Christian Fiction category for Firewall. Connect with DiAnn here: www.diannmills.com





A SUSPICIOUS DEATH, A SECRET PLOT, A BUDDING ROMANCE. A pacemaker should have saved oil and gas magnate Nathan Moore’s life. Instead, it provided his killer with a perfect means of execution. Special Agent Tori Templeton teams up with US Marshall Cole Jeffers to investigate Nathan’s murder and whether it’s connected to a recent bombing at one of Nathan’s oil rigs. The closer they get to finding the killer, and to each other, the more intent someone is in silencing them for good.


125 comments :

  1. Welcome DiAnn!! Oh I'm so excited to see you here :-)

    As a reader, I love "stepping into the characters shoes"!! As if I just stepped into the pages of the books and I became part of everything...seeing every scene, smelling every scent, feeling every emotion and even thinking every thought the hero or heroine does. I can connect deeper with the story and I'll truly come away from it feeling like I lived another life somewhere else.

    I really like how you put it here "Passion wraps its arm around emotion, and within that depth of writing, the writer can provide an adventure that ripples with credibility and unexpected happenings". Gives me chills down the arm reading it, if only all authors can create that depth and have that passion :-)

    Thanks for a fun post. I really like getting to know how authors operate and how they create their stories. Some of them so real you think it's actually happening!! That's a passionate author :-)

    Please toss my name in the hat for a chance to win your newest novel "Deep Extraction", thanks so much. I have read a few of your novels (enjoyed them tremendously) and always love the chance to read more :-)

    Blessings!

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    1. Thanks, Trixi, glad I could help. We can't expect our readers to have passion for our stories if we don't have it!

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  2. Trixi, that is a great quote from DiAnn! It inspires me to try harder as a writer.

    Thanks for stopping by!

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    1. Thanks, Missy! Have a super day!

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  3. Welcome back, DiAnn. Delighted to have you spend the day with us. I BROUGHT BAGELS! This is like a movie director finding the perfect cast and then immersing them in character.

    I create passion by channeling my characters. By becoming one with them.

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    1. I think I do that, too, Tina. That's what makes me cry and laugh when I write some scenes. :)

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    2. Oh, Tina, bagels! Toasted with butter? Asiago cheese? Ok, back to writing. Thanks for posting, and yes, I'm passionate about creating story.

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  4. DiAnn, we're so glad you joined us! You asked how we create passion in our story. I try to use dig deep and use personal struggles to inform my stories. Even if the struggles aren't exactly the same. I can take the emotions and apply them to different situations.

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    1. Hi, Missy, Donald Maass, in Writing the Breakout Novel, (a favorite) suggests writers journal their most painful experience then translate the experience/experiences into their characters.

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    2. DiAnn, that's a great idea. I'm not a journaler (used to be, though). Maybe I need to start it up again.

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  5. Hi DiAnn:

    So happy! I just checked your books on Amazon and bought "The Homestead Brides Collection: 9 Pioneering Couples Risk All for Love and Land" for only $1.59. It features three Seekers, a favorite Seeker friend, a Tulsa neighbor, and of course, yourself.

    How do I give my characters passion? I don't give them passion. I create the context where the characters must be feeling the passion. The advantage here is that I can do this without having to feel the passion myself. This way the reality of the character's feeling does not depend on what, I as a writer, am feeling but rather what any human would be feeling under the same circumstances.

    The disadvantage is that this is very hard to set up. It is one step deeper than showing which is one step deeper than telling. I call it 'emoting'.

    BTW: if you are going to start doing this, it is best to start with 'injustice'; I have found it the easiest passion to emote.

    Please enter me in the drawing for your new book. I live here in the oil patch! I'm like 'in the choir'. : )

    Vince

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    1. Vince, thanks for letting us know about the sale!

      Are you talking about setting up the plot so it involves more universal stakes?

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    2. Hi, Vince, of course you're entered! Another way of looking at the passion/emotion is how does a writer immerse a reader into the experience and not let go. Emotions that are true to character will accomplish that feat.

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  6. Hi DiAnn,

    Thanks again for this timely reminder. Passion is catching and if I'm not infected, why would my reader be?

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    1. Hi, Anna! I love this description. :)

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    2. Yes! We want to entertain, inspire, and encourage our readers.

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  7. I've got some nice hot coffee and tea for everyone this morning to go with Tina's bagels. Strongly caffeinated for me. :)

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    1. Bagels and hot tea. I'm ready to roll. Thanks Missy and Tina!

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    2. Missy, dark roasted and black, please!

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  8. Hi Diann! Sometimes in working with the public you have to put your poker face on and some days that poker face stays on. So, if I'm not feeling the emotions of my characters, I'll sometime watch HGTV. Many times the home buyers are passionate about what they want and at the end of the show they're in tears as they see their dreams become reality. I'm usually moved and ready to tackle my WIP.

    Thanks for sharing and please add my name to the drawing. Thanks!

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    1. Jackie, what a great idea! HGTV (along with the Food Network) are my go-to channels for watching and for background noise while I work. I need to pay more attention to the emotions!

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    2. Hi, Jackie, that must be why I love Fixer-Upper! I think any well-plotted and well-acted movie shows us emotions too.

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    3. How interesting, Jackie! I like watching the shows that feature beach property...the beach is always my happy place! :)

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    4. I love Fixer Upper. It's the only HGTV show I watch, but I love Chip and Joanna. And those KIDS!!!!!! Drake, Duke, Ella and Emmie..... OH MY STARS!!!!

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    5. I love Fixer Upper too, and my son and his wife are about to move to Waco. We've joked about them applying to get Chip and Joanna to fix a house for them. Joked, because they probably don't have enough time. But they may apply anyway. I'll keep you all posted.

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  9. Diann, Thanks for this post. It is so helpful. Please enter me in the drawing for your book.

    I become my character and when the scene is an emotional one I feel wrung out when I am through writing it.

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    1. Wilani, I agree. I, too, feel wrung out after writing difficult scenes. It's tiring, but it's a good thing!

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    2. Hi, Wilani, I'm thinking your emotional scenes are amazing.

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  10. My favorite way to get in deep with a character is seeing everything through their eyes first person. I love reading it and I love writing it. And when I need a little extra passion for my stories, I get it from music and other people's stories. Gives me a storytelling adrenaline rush.

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    1. Boo, I once tried writing a scene I'd been having trouble with in first person. It really was eye opening. I probably need to try that more often. Thanks for the suggestion!

      You know, music really moves me. And so does good writing. Your ideas really work for me, too!

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    2. Thanks, Boo, I believe writers feel passionately so they can write passionately!

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  11. DiAnn, this is good and so helpful. I used to read your column in Christian Fiction Online. Good advice.
    I agree with Missy that we have to dig deep into our own emotions, pasts and hurts.
    I've been critiqued for not putting enough emotion on my pages and not making my characters "relatable" enough, so it's a constant learning curve for me. I also tend to be very New England-y and have my characters suffer silently. Which I guess is okay, but I have to work on showing what's happening to them INTERNALLY. I have to remind myself that I'm not Edith Wharton and I'm not writing "Ethan Frome."
    Please put me in the drawing, I'm looking for something new to read--and review!
    Kathy Bailey

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    1. Kathy, I'm writing a character now who's very private. I have to make sure to give him enough POV time. His scenes keep coming up short! I think I need to spend more time in his thoughts.

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    2. Kathy, writing is not just about creating a great story, but we have to face our own emotions head on. Gulp!

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  12. BTW, "Ethan Frome" is the most depressing book EVER.
    KB

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    1. LOL, Kathy. I read it many years ago but can't remember it at all. Maybe I blocked it out! haha

      Okay, now I'm heading to Amazon to read about it and refresh my memory.

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    2. I haven't read it - maybe that's a good thing!

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  13. Diann, welcome back to Seekerville. Thanks for these great tips on creating passion in our stories! It always takes me a long time to truly know my characters struggles and how they'd react. Once I do, it's tougher yet to dig that deep inside me and "bleed" on the page, yet that's what we have to do when we are passionate about what we have to say.

    The fun part of writing a romance is creating heroes and heroines who are not only perfect for the role they play, but also perfect for each other. Even when they don't see that at first.

    Janet

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    1. Thanks, Janet, romance is the sweet spot for all of us.

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    2. Good point, Janet! It takes me a while to get to know my characters, too.

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    3. Not surprising as it takes time to know real people too. :-)

      Janet

      Janet

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  14. Good morning, Seekers! And welcome DiAnn. Thanks for sharing these tips with us.

    I've got fresh made, whole wheat pancakes to share this morning.

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    1. Thanks, Amber, if I wasn't driving through Kansas (actually husband is driving) I'd be right there!

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  15. DiAnn, what a delight to have you here this morning! And thank you for an insightful post about not just telling the story but feeling the story. I love emotion in stories, I love real-life related drama even in comedies. That mix is such a perfect blend, the "laughter through tears" is my favorite emotion style...

    Steel Magnolias.... Field of Dreams... I love seeing the humor soften the angst just like it does in our daily lives.

    I think it's time for fresh coffee.... Luckily I have plenty to share!

    Huge congrats on all of your successes. What a wonderful body of work!

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    1. Hi, Ruth, I think Steel Magnolias is a tribute to all writers who dig deep for emotion.

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    2. Ruthy, I'll add some Italian Sweet Cream creamer to your coffee!

      I, too, love humor mixed with the drama.

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  16. Hi DiAnn and welcome to Seekerville. Great points to consider for filling our novels with passion. Thanks for such a comprehensive list. Have a great day and thanks again for joining us.

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    1. Thank you, Sandra. May you write a bestseller!

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  17. Hello DiAnn, you're a new-to-me author and your post is extremely helpful. I find if I'm stuck on a scene with a character I do a journal entry "in character" and let them rip. It usually only takes two paragraphs before I'm "channeling" them, as Tina said. It works for me, anyway! Please enter me in the drawing for your book. I love FBI stories. Have a blessed day with us. :)

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    1. Hi, Laurie, you have the key to unlock emotion! Yep! You're entered in the giveaway.

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    2. Laurie, I love the idea of journaling as the character when stuck. Thanks for sharing!

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  18. Welcome back, DiAnn! I loved your analogy of how switching viewpoints is like asking your reader to step out of one character's "closet" and into another.

    And you're so right about choosing the right POV for any given scene. I decided by asking which character has the most at stake in the scene's outcome. Which character is most emotionally involved here? Which character has the most to lose (or gain)?

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    1. Thanks, Myra, our like minds must stem back to our once a week crit sessions at Boston Market. :)

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    2. Myra, I loved that quote, too. It truly is hard to switch POV's when I'm really into a story I'm reading.

      As for who has the most to gain or lose, it's sometimes interesting to choose the opposite character as the POV character just to watch the reaction of the other character. Sometimes that's even more emotional for the reader.

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    3. Oh, yes, DiAnn, I never pass a Boston Market that I don't remember those days! I learned so much from our critiques.

      Missy, I agree--it can be very enlightening to get the opposite character's reaction and personal insights into a situation.

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  19. Good morning, DiAnn! Ripping the scars off our hearts? That's some tough stuff. The third book I wrote (unpublished/pre-published) was so personal that I cried through the second half as I faced a particular issue I hadn't wanted to deal with before. It's still unpublished and probably better served as therapy. (I can't say the problem was solved, but the writing helped me personally.) But it challenged me to go deep, and although I haven't written anything as personal since, I think it probably helped both personally and professionally. Thanks for a terrific post!

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    1. Meghan, you inspire me, and I know you inspire other writers with your heart-felt words. Writing is never easy! Bring on the tissues.

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    2. Meghan, I've considered writing about some tough issues but haven't gone there yet. I'll keep your experience in mind as I move down the road just a bit and consider it again.

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  20. Hi DiAnn! I have a question about this: "Every time we change point of views, we are asking the reader to step out of the character’s closet, undress, and dress again in the new character’s POV. How many times is that transition necessary for our story?"

    When the greater part of a story is told from the heroine's POV, but there are times when the story requires the hero's POV, what do you think is the best way (for the reader) to transition between the two? I've seen extra space between paragraphs, new chapters, small headings that tell who the character is ... any thoughts?

    Thanks!
    Nancy C

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    1. Hi, Nancy, I suggest a distinction of a new chapter or a pound sign to show a POV change. A double space is used when the new POV character is in the same scene. The unique character traits will shine through dialogue and narration, showing the reader the new POV.

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    2. One thing I've learned, Nancy, is that when you do change POVs in the next scene, make sure the POV is clearly identifiable in the very first line or two so there's no confusion for the reader.

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    3. NANCY, DiAnn and Myra are SO right about making the distinction crystal clear as to whose POV you are in. I used to use a double-space, but when my earlier books went to ebook, I noticed that often that space was missing and the two POVs just ran into each other, which upset me because it looked like I was head-hopping. Also, in my earlier books, my publisher utilized a scene change with a double-space, too, so it was very confusing.

      So now I use a double dash between POVs to indicate a shift, but like Myra says, you have to differentiate in the first few lines with an action or thought by the new POV character.

      I love this subject because I'm one of the few authors who loves multiple POVs in a scene since I feel they can serve a very useful purpose. My record is 11 POVs in one hospital scene where my close-knit Irish family is devastated when the father has a heart attack. It was SO much fun for me to reveal to the reader how each of the characters were feeling. :)

      Anyway, here's my Seeker blog on the subject in case you're interested:

      CONFESSIONS OF A POV QUEEN

      Hugs,
      Julie

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    4. Thanks for the question, Nancy. And thanks for those of you sharing your thoughts.

      Julie, 11 pov's!! Wow! :)

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    5. Due to the fact that my other POV's are not that many and sometimes step away from my main heroine's journey in order to show what other characters are doing, I show my character's POV's by creating a section that is not a chapter and says the other character's name in the place of the chapter title.

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    6. These are wonderful comments! I appreciate everyone responding.

      DiAnn said: The unique character traits will shine through dialogue and narration, showing the reader the new POV. That is definitely a way to test whether the characters are unique from one another. Thank you!

      Myra, your tip about being sure the POV character is established in the first sentence is particularly helpful, too.

      I wondered about the extra/double space because that could so easily disappear in formatting. Sorry it happened to you, Julie, but thanks for the heads-up.
      Thanks for the link. I'm awed that you have used 11 POVs! :-)

      That's an interesting approach, Nicki. I can see how it would work in that situation.

      Seekerville is the best!

      Nancy C

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    7. Yes,Seekerville is amazing!

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  21. DIANN!! Welcome back to Seekerville, especially talking about my FAVORITE subject: PASSION!! You're one of the authors who does passion so very well, so it's an honor to have you here today!

    My tagline is "Passion With a Purpose," so I'm all about infusing it into my novels, trust me!

    You asked: How do you create passion in your story?

    Well, it certainly helps if one is a CDQ (caffeinated drama queen) such as moi, but your tips above are EXCELLENT for any writer, CDQ or no, to accomplish this feat.

    The #1 way I create passion in my stories is to do exactly what your fabulous Wordsworth quote said,“Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” At times I feel like I'm cutting a vein and bleeding onto the keyboard, the passion is so intense inside of me, which hopefully translates to the reader in a similar way.

    The main way I like to inject passion into my stories is through the intensity of emotions played out in movie mode, pumping them up until the reader experiences what both the characters and I am experiencing. I won't bore you or everybody else with the various means I use since it would take too long, but I actually go into this in great detail in my workbook, ROMANCE-OLOGY 101: Writing Romantic Tension for the Inspirational and Sweet Markets
    and my Seeker blog entitled KEEPING IT "REEL" ... OR A "NOVEL" APPROACH TO PUTTING A MOVIE IN YOUR READER'S MIND.

    Anyway -- FUN subject, so thank you for a great discussion to kick off the week!

    Hugs,
    Julie

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    1. Thanks, Julie, Wadsworth was the master - “Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.” Passion. Emotion. Readers can't get enough.

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    2. Julie, you were the reason I didn't get any writing done this weekend! First, I went to InD'tales, read the article, signed up, entered your contest, went to Amazon, clicked on your book, A Passion Most Pure, and began to read and read and read. You could never have written that book without all the "passion" you wrote with, and the passion you put in the book. I'm with you all the way. My first book will be a bit more sensual, but not over the top. Looking forward to reading the second in the series, etc.. Thanks for spending the time writing such an awesome book!

      Marcia

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    3. Uh-oh, MARCIA, I'm not in trouble, am I?? ;)

      Girl, you just made my day with your sweet comment, and I cannot thank you enough for taking the time to read the InD'Tales interview, entering my contest, AND reading APMP -- HOLY COW!!

      It sounds like you need to check out my Seeker blog on Wednesday, my friend, because the editor of InD'Tales, T.J. Mackay, is going to be here encouraging writers like YOU to take your edgy writing to the secular arena to win some souls for Christ, so do come by, okay?

      And just FYI, I don't know if you have read any of my other books, but I have a free download available right now for the prequel novella to my new contemporary series, Isle of Hope, so I hope you take advantage. Here's the link:

      A GLIMMER OF HOPE

      Thanks again, Marcia, for your wonderful support, and hope to chat with you on Wed. too!

      Hugs,
      Julie

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    4. No, Julie, no one is ever in trouble when I'm reading a good book...

      Thanks for the invite. I'm taking two online classes right now, so I will be in my "office" and will certainly stop your blog by for a bit.

      Thanks for the link...APMP is the first book of yours I have read, and looking forward to reading more. I am a voracious reader, and sometimes...well, most times...it gets in the way of my writing. But, I claim it is all in the name of research and let myself get away with it.

      Blessings,

      Marcia

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  22. So good to have you with us today, DiAnn! Great blog and an important topic. If I struggle, as a writer, to enter fully into my character's POV, I revisit his/her internal conflict. Often that pesky GMC needs to be tweaked, just a bit, to make the story come alive. When I find that wound that keeps the heroine/hero from living life to the full, I can usually move quickly through the story. It's finding that buried pain that often has me pulling out my hair as I begin to write...

    Pouring a cup of Ruthy's strong coffee to go with Tina's bagels.

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    1. Good point, Debby! The internal drives it in my opinion.

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    2. Hi, Debby, buried pain - great terminology. We all have it, and so our characters need to unload it. :)

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  23. Hi DiAnn! Your thoughts on POV struck me this morning. Causing our characters to jump in and out. In the case where you have two POV's (hero/heroine) should they always be the same word count or getting equal "showtime"?

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    1. Hi Sharee, I strive for balance with the hero and heroine. But sometimes the heroine has more to say! Go figure.

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    2. I, too, try to stay pretty balanced. But usually one of my characters has more of a journey, and that one probably has more time in his/her POV. Although, I almost always alternate back and forth from one POV to the other. I don't often do two scenes in a row in the same POV.

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  24. I love this advice. I have had many books that I just cannot get through and I put down for those various reasons. (I would love to be entered! Thanks!)

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    1. Hi, Susan, you are entered! Thanks for posting.

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    2. Thanks for stopping by, Susan!

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  25. All very good tips, I probably create passion the best by inserting myself into my character's place (writing in the personal first person POV often helps with this). Also since I have already written two and a half books about these certain characters (over 200,000 words) it is so much easier to slip into their roles, and know their personalities and how they would act and feel.

    It is definitely hardest writing the first books of a series, after that you have gotten a good feel for the characters.

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    1. Nicki, that would definitely make it easier to get into POV if you've spend a lot of time with the characters.

      They do become sort of like our alter-egos sometimes! :)

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    2. Hi, Nicki, first person is an adventure in emotional depth, as though the reader is peeking through the pages of the character's diary.

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  26. DiAnn, I so appreciated your post. I think one of the scariest parts of writing is digging deep into my own heart to gain the depth and understanding about what and how my characters feel and act on those feelings. And yes, knowing their backstory is key too. Your suggestions make a lot of sense! Thanks for sharing your wisdom here today. :)

    I'd like my name entered in the drawing, please. :)

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    1. Hi, Jeanne, yes, you're entered in the giveaway. I often think we writers should have a second career as psychologists to help us better understand our characters. Diving into our own feelings is scary!

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  27. DiAnn, I enjoy a well written story. When an author is passionate about their work, it shines through in the story.

    HAPPY PASSOVER!

    Please enter me in the drawing.

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    1. Hi, Caryl, you are entered!

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    2. Caryl, I was just listening to NPR and they interviewed a woman about cooking the Passover feast. It sounded wonderful!

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  28. Thank you DiAnn for the wonderful post. I especially made note of the POV points. I can't say for sure how many times, but there have definitely been times when POV has caused my connection with a character to change. Pinning! Have a beautiful day!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Kelly!

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    2. Thanks, Kelly, choosing "who has the most to lose" is extremely difficult. I'm right there with you!

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  29. Thanks, DiAnn, for the awesome tips. The way I try to create passion in my story(ies) is probably a bit unconventional from the other replies. First, I get comfy in my big office chair, leaning my head back on the headrest. Second, I close my eyes and try to imagine the character's feelings, body language, and then try and fixate on the dialogue. Somehow, when I'm in that zen moment, it comes to me. I get my best dialogue this way as I've given myself permission to let go of my beliefs and insecurities about the scene and let my characters take over. Most of them are not as shy as I am, or modest!

    Please enter me in the drawing.

    Blessings,

    Marcia

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    1. Hi, Marcia, you are entered! I love your way of diving into POV. Congrats on sharing a great tip.

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    2. I love that, Marcia! It's like letting a movie play in your head.

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  30. DiAnn, I am late getting here today but glad I stopped in. I enjoyed this post and it will make me think about the passion I need for writing. Please enter me for your book. I love your suspenseful stories!

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  31. DiAnn such great advice. Very challenging. I am ready to do revisions on a story I don't feel like I've loaded with enough emotion.
    I'll use these points from this article to try and bring things to live, and awaken some passion!

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    1. Hi Mary, thanks for the kind words. I always read emotion in your books.

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  32. Great tips, DiAnn! When I need to go deep, music is the way. Thanks for visiting today!

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    1. Jill, music really helps me, too.

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    2. Hi, Jill, music that's in the mood for the story is a great way to get into the zone!

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  33. Say you have a book where the POV is switching between two characters. If you want to minimize POV switches, are you suggesting that sometimes you want to stay in one character's POV for several scenes before switching to another character?

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    1. Walt, I typically switch after each scene. But I'll be interested to see what DiAnn says if she gets a chance to come by again tomorrow. Thanks for your question!

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    2. Hi Walt, No, I'm not saying that at all. Only to make a clear and distinct transition. Sometimes I write two scenes in the same POV, and other times I switch back and forth. It depends on the scene and the plot. Hope this helps!

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  34. Thanks for the tips, DiAnn! I'm printing this out so I can have it on hand for revisions I'm about to tackle.

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    1. Laura, thanks for stopping by!

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    2. Hi, Laura, that is a great ego-booster for me. So glad I could help.

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    3. A great post. I'm mulling over how often to change pov advice. I like 50-50 #heroine-hero, so you've given me something to consider. Thx!

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  35. Hi DiAnn! I'm soaking up this information. My favorite stories to read are the ones with POV from both the hero and the heroine so that is what I'm writing. I am reading Writing the Breakout Novel right now so I'm trying to apply what I'm learning from that too.

    Thanks for info and the giveaway!

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    1. Loraine, I love to see both pov's in a romance too.

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    2. Loraine, a writer never goes wrong with a Donald Maass book!

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  36. DiAnn
    I always enjoy learning from the best.Your in sights always make my writing better. Wonderful post. Put me in the drawing.

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    1. Thanks for posting, and you are in the drawing!

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  37. I loved this article and all the helpful tips
    Please enter me into the drawing!

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  38. Your tips can apply as well to memoir writing, my genre. Yes, please enter me into the drawing.

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    1. Hi, Marian, oh my goodness, yes, memoir writing is rich with emotion. You are entered in the giveaway!

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  39. I would love to be entered. Thank you for the great article.
    Becky B.

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  40. Nice job, DiAnn!

    Please enter me in your drawing for a copy of "Deep Extraction"

    May God bless you and all of Seekerville!

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  41. Hi DiAnn, I appreciated your question about the POV and the reader. You asked "How often will readers move their passion to another character?" I recently read a book written with three POVs and I found it to be almost exhausting. It was a good story but I sometimes forgot who was speaking.
    I would appreciate an entry in the drawing for your new book.
    Blessings!
    Connie
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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