Thursday, May 18, 2017

A Branding Primer

with guest Laurie Tomlinson.

Thank you so much, Seekers, for inviting this self-professed marketing geek to talk about one of my favorite subjects. Let’s get to it, shall we?

What is Branding and Why Is It Important?

I love marketing guru Seth Godin’s definition:
 “A brand is the set of expectations, memories, stories, and relationships that, taken together, account for a consumer’s decision to choose one product or service over another.” 
Many people mistake a cohesive style for brand, and while it’s an important component, it’s only a small part of it.

Branding is the collective story you tell industry professionals and readers about you and your work. It’s what sets you apart from other authors, not in a dog-eat-dog kind of way, but in a way that represents the unique aspects that make you *you*. It’s how, when readers are scrolling through their social media, they can tell a post is from you even before they see your name.

Identifying the Vision and Mission of Your Brand

While an author tagline is great because it tells the audience what they can expect up front, knowing the vision and mission behind your work is most crucial. Everything we write, from the pages of our books, to our query letters, to the tone and content of our social media should tell that for us.

Vision answers the question: What do I write?
Mission answers the question: Why do I write?

So if, for example, you write authentic women’s fiction (what) to give readers hope through relatable characters (why), your blog posts will be hope-filled, your voice authentic, and your content primarily centered around women.

Many of us who are doing our heart’s work have huge heart-dreams and run into a snag when trying to be succinct in the themes/topics we cover, but inconsistency will only confuse readers and detract from our message. To create a more defined brand vision and mission, we should go with our strongest values and the characteristics we can see being most cohesive across our unique body of work.



Identifying Our Audience

A huge key to brand is identifying our audience. This is the person who will benefit the most from our work. One thing I’ve always encouraged clients to do is to name the person they’re writing for. Mine is Meg. It may sound kind of weird—especially if you talk about this pretend person in a pitch appointment (cough, or so I’ve been told)—but we all create and talk to imaginary people, so let’s go with it.

Just as we research and profile characters before beginning a new project, it’s important to know and identify as much as possible about our ideal audience. Of course, our work will naturally appeal to a broader range of people, but if we write for anyone and everyone who will listen, our message as a whole will be watered down, and our potential for impact will suffer.

At the very least, identifying age, gender, and what makes this person click a link or pick up a book can be helpful. If you write for more than one genre, then look for the common denominators in your audience and refine from there.

But most importantly, research what your audience needs the most from you. Is it hope? Entertainment? Solidarity? Authenticity? Hopefully, this lines up with the why of your vision and what you uniquely have to offer.

Once you've determined your ideal audience, every branding decision should consider that person. I know it sounds like a lot of work, but you will soon develop an instinct for what (and where) you write, the tones you use, and the messages you send. And your intentionality with your brand will result in the reward of a more meaningful conversation between you and your audience.

A Case Study:

In my debut novel, With No Reservations, my heroine Sloane is a popular food blogger who knows a lot about branding and reaching her ideal audience. Her website is called Mise en Place, a French culinary term for assembling ingredients prior to cooking. The photos she uses have distinctive color contrast and always feature shots of the recipe ingredients neatly (and appetizingly!) arranged.

All of her design decisions and word choices reflect an approachable, organized, and beautiful cooking experience because that’s what her audience needs for recipe inspiration.

Sloane writes to give accessible, step-by-step recipes to home cooks who want to mix up their rotation. Her ideal reader, a busy 30-year-old housewife named Michelle who found her on Pinterest, is attracted to a recipe post because of its beautiful pictures, knows it’s from Sloane because of her unique style of photos, and comes back to the website because the step-by-step format of the recipes makes her feel like she can try anything.

While Sloane’s recipe posts naturally attract a broader audience—men who love to cook, 20-year-olds who are getting their first apartments, and other cooking enthusiasts—the style and content decisions she makes stay true to her vision and what’s accessible and appealing to Michelle. Sloane regularly gauges this, and may shift and adapt things according to the conversation and reader feedback her content generates.

So, to sum things up, it's simple. Once you’ve refined the vision and message for your author brand, the more you will know about your ideal audience. And the more you know about your person, the easier your decisions will be and the more your content will resonate.

What and who are you writing for? Is there an author you can think of with a distinctive brand?

About With No Reservations: There can be more than comfort in food…

What could well-known and wealthy Graham Cooper Jr. have in common with a blogger like Sloane Bradley, a woman with secrets she's kept firmly out of the public eye? That is, besides a love of food. Sloane still can't believe Cooper's the chef at the restaurant she's been assigned to promote. But she's boiling to prove to him that her "little blog" can put his place on the map. She can also fall head over heels for the guy, who has secrets of his own, it turns out…except for one thing. She can't get past the post-traumatic stress disorder that keeps her walled up in her home studio.




Leave a comment today for an opportunity to win a copy of With No Reservations. Winner announced in the Weekend Edition. Seekerville is tossing in two more copies. print or ebook.


About the Author: Laurie Tomlinson is an award-winning contemporary romance author and cheerleader for creatives. Previously a full-time book publicist, she now runs an editing and PR consulting business, 1624 Communications.


Her novella That’s When I Knew was featured in the Love at First Laugh collection, and her debut novel, With No Reservations, is now available from Harlequin Heartwarming. You can connect with Laurie on her websiteFacebook page, and Instagram.


112 comments :

  1. Hi Laurie and welcome to Seekerville. What a great topic and something we sometimes forget to think about. The audience. It is key especially when you are marketing. Vince often advises us to think of the market and audience even before we start writing the novel. Thanks for the timely reminder. Tara Taylor Quinn targeted many of her novels to abused women and her books had characters that were either abused or dealt with a victim. She targeted a lot of her marketing to groups who help and work with abused women. She has a big following because she targeted for awareness of the problem also.

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    1. Hi Sandra! Love that about Tara. An excellent example :) Thanks for the warm welcome! The strawberry shortcake sounds delicious.

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    2. Sandra, thanks for sharing that info about Tara's books.

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  2. Its late, so I forgot to mention that I hope you have a wonderful day. Thanks so much for joining us.

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  3. I brought some strawberry shortcake to nibble on. Love it for breakfast too. smile

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  4. Welcome back to Seekerville, Laurie and congratulations on your debut release from Heartwarming. WHO DOESN'T LOVE A STORY WITH A GUY & FOOD. You nailed it.

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  5. Now, let's sit down and chat about Meg. Who is Meg? How long has she been your imaginary friend? Can you share Meg's demographics???

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    1. Tina! Thanks for hosting me again! So happy to be here :) It took me a while (and a few books) to refine my ideal audience. Meg is someone who values authenticity and wants to see characters who are like her. She needs to see that love prevails and the Lord can redeem even the messiest situations. Even though my characters are primarily 20s and 30s, I think anchoring my brand and message on those things can serve a broader audience, too :) At least that's my hope!

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  6. I'm not a writer, but there are lots of authors who are my go-to. I love their unique writers voice, style, tone and know exactly what to expect when I read their books. Not that there's no surprises within the pages, but I KNOW what I'm getting into with their books...if that makes sense! And I anticipate (or salivate, lol) it before I even open the first page. I really hope this is on topic, like Sandra said, it's late and my brain doesn't always function when it's tired :-) By the way, thanks for the strawberry shortcake, Sandra! It's one of my favorite Summer treats.

    Congrats on your debut novel Laurie!! I'm a huge foodie & love to cook so your book sounds wonderful! Thanks for the generosity and opportunity to win a copy.

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    1. Thanks Trixi, I love strawberries too.

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    2. That's what every writer wants to hear, Trixi!

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  7. This is very interesting, Laurie.

    I'd not thought of branding in this way, but you're so right!

    Just one thing though... Watch out on that dog-eat-dog kinda thing, especially as the author of a novel about a food blogger. ;)

    Seriously - you've given me much to consider as I go forward. Thank you!

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  8. I had not thought of author branding before, but I suppose that those authors who stand out for me must be doing something right.

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    1. You're exactly right, Mary! I'm sure they'd love to hear that, too!

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  9. Laurie, thanks for being here today. You've brought up so many good points. Like Sandra mentioned about Tara, I've always felt my calling was to write books that ministered to women, that empower them... so we deal with past traumas and growth and it appears to be working... BUT... I do it under the label of romance and strength, not victimization and that seems to broaden the appeal. I've got a Womens Fiction series coming out with Waterfall/Amazon starting this fall, and it was so much fun to write these dynamic women... and then to layer in potential romance. To me, that's an ideal blend for storytelling... This is a wonderful post, I'm so glad you were here to explain it this way.

    I like to see authors self-establish, then branch out. Like a tree... strong roots in one genre, but don't get too comfy cozy because you might have to expand your leafy horizons!

    If nothing else, this industry changes monthly... and sometimes weekly.

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    1. Thanks, Ruthy! Love this: "I do it under the label of romance and strength, not victimization and that seems to broaden the appeal." So important, and you do it so well! Yes, the industry is constantly changing, and we can branch out as long as we stay established to the roots of why we write, what's important to us, and what our readers need!

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  10. You've given me so much to think about, Laurie. Thank you for being here today. Congratulations on your release!

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  11. Hi Laurie,
    You nailed me with your tagline,
    {Stories of grace in the beautiful mess}

    Life is messy, but there's so much beauty and grace to be had in the mist of it. I love the way you think, I can tell we are going to be book buddies.

    Congratulations on your debut novel, With No Reservations. I've had it on my radar since I started hearing about it on blogs before it even came out. As Tina said, "you can't go wrong with a guy and food", so true. Sign me up! I'd love to be in your drawing.

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    1. We sound like kindred spirits, Tracey! Thanks for commenting :)

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  12. but we all create and talk to imaginary people, so let’s go with it

    YES! I'm laughing because this is so true. Right now I've not a clue on my target audience and, of course, I'm nowhere near to being published. This post is wonderful stuff for me to think about and work on. Thanks!

    I love your blurb for your book. Congrats on your debut! Sign me up for the drawing. I'll need to put a tab on the title, because if I don't win it, I'm definitely going to want to buy it. Sounds like a great read.

    Thanks again for visiting. I learned something new today, and got a good laugh in as well. What's better than that?

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    1. So glad it resonated with you, Deb! And I totally agree about Mary Connealy! :)

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  13. p.s. Mary Connealy has a definite, distinctive brand, imho. You always know what you're gonna get and Mary ALWAYS delivers. yay.

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    1. Agree, Julie and Mary and Ruthy are very distinctive. With Debby moving into Amish Suspense, her brand is becoming more solidified as well. MUST LEARN FROM THIS!!

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  14. Hi Laurie,

    Congratulations on your book! It sounds like a great story. Thanks for sharing about branding. I still struggle with branding and blogging. I focus on love God, family and country. Is that too big?

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    1. Those are awesome things to focus on, Jackie!

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  15. What I write, clean speculative fiction in the young adult category, who I write for are teenage girls who are around my age and are looking for a clean but still interesting book.

    I would say that an author with a definitive, distinctive brand is Ally Carter.

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    1. You are so right about Ally Carter! And it sounds like you're definitely on the right track, Nicki!

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  16. Great post, Laurie, and something for me to think about as I am writing my first book.

    Please enter me in the drawing for your book. It looks good!

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  17. Good morning Laurie.
    My target audience? I'm not certain. I do know if I make my target editors, it makes me uptight and nothing comes out right.
    The first story I ever wrote I mailed (yes, the old-fashioned way) 2 chapters at a time to a friend of mine. She'd had some childhood issues that my character had. Many times I wrote what I thought she'd like to see. And you know, she loved it and it made the writing much easier.

    Makes perfect sense to me.

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    1. Sounds like you do have your target audience nailed down, Connie! That's such a good point about not targeting editors and making sure we write what resonates with us and our audience instead of catering to what we believe are their standards.

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  18. LAURIE, WELCOME BACK TO SEEKERVILLE!!

    And I'll be the first to admit that not only does the subject of "branding" scare the pejeebers out of me, but I had a very limited understanding of what it meant until your blog today, so THANK YOU!!

    I have to admit, I always thought my audience or my "Madison" (my Meg) would be the teenage and young adult sector, but I was shocked to see that a large sector of my audience are the 30 to 50-year-old range, which shocked the socks off of me. Suddenly instead of a Madison, I had a Mary or a Susan. I suppose this makes sense when you realize my "brand" as I see it is purity before marriage, which is something moms would be a LOT more prone to read about than young women. :|

    Very interesting post!

    Hugs,
    Julie

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    1. So happy to be here, Julie! I love love love this example of how, if we stay true to ourselves and what the Lord has called us to write, it often extends beyond our ideal audience in unexpected ways!

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  19. Hi Laurie!!!! What a great post and great advice. Now I'm going to spend all day trying to come up with a name for my audience. My tag line is "Country roads, small towns, happily ever after." Which perfectly sums up the type of stories I write. Branding is important and I can't wait to put some of your advice to work!

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    1. Seriously. I love, love that concept.

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    2. Agreed with them! Excellent tagline, and you capture it so well!

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  20. Welcome to Seekerville, Laurie - and congrats on "With No Reservations"!! I enjoyed your post and would love to be included in the drawing to win a copy of "With No Reservations" - a cute romance in which both Graham and Sloane have their eyes opened, I'm betting!! Thanks for the giveaway opportunity!!

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    1. Bonton! Big hugs out to you! Great to see you here.

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    2. Thank you, Bonnie! Good luck :)

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    3. Waving to Bonnie! Sending hugs and love too!

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    4. Thank you, ladies!! A wonderful day to say "hi" and send hugs to each of you today - you too, Patti Jo!!

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  21. Laurie, welcome back to Seekerville!! Your book looks great! I love stories with secrets.

    I'd believed my brand was inspirational and romance so my readers would be mostly women who loved God and romance. Then I'd narrowed it down to the historical genre so that meant readers who love venturing into the past, though I always try to make the issues relevant for women today. Your post shows me that I've been too broad and too narrow in the definition of brand. The reason/the why I want to write stories is to give readers hope but also the sense of being heard. Pondering all this. Thanks for your post!!

    Janet

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    1. I'm glad it gave you lots to think about, Janet! Thanks for having me!

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  22. Laurie, what a great post! The questions you pose are ones I need to think over and write down the answers. You've got me thinking. You took the big, abstract concept of "brand" and made it accessible. Thank you!

    And your book sounds like fun! I look forward to reading it!

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    1. JEANNE! So happy to see you here! Glad to help :)

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  23. Love your insights into marketing, Laurie! For me, one of the hardest parts of keeping my branding cohesive is knowing how much of my posts should be geared toward my audience and how much of my personal, day-to-day life I should share. I think Courtney Walsh does such a great job of this, and I always know her posts will be encouraging.

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    1. Welcome to Seekerville, Amanda Everett. Delighted to see you here. Are you a writer or a reader? Or both.

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    2. You're absolutely right about Courtney, Amanda! Often I see what she does on social media and wish I'd have thought of it myself :)

      Tina, you'll love Amanda. She is both a reader AND an up-and-coming author who really *gets it*!

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    3. So sweet of you to say, Laurie!

      Hi, Tina! As Laurie said, I'm both an avid reader and a pre-published author. I just finished my first novel and am currently working on edits

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  24. Thank you so much for this informative post! I've needed to do some branding for my book review blog and social media but I'm totally intimidated! Your advice has been so helpful.

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    1. Don't be intimidated at all, Heidi! If you refine your brand into something you really like and feel proud of, you'll love "coming to work" every day :) Own it, girl!

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  25. Laurie, what are you and Meg working on now? And of course we want to know...pantser or plotter. Heartwarming's are BIG books as far as word count. Are you by nature a long writer?

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    1. I'm a reformed pantser trying to learn how to plot :) I'm currently working on two proposals and hope to be able to share more soon!

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  26. Laurie, With No Reservations sound like a cute story, but also with a serious side. Post-traumatic stress disorder that keeps her at home. Keep help but think of Nim's Island where Jodie Foster is afraid to go out of her house.

    Congratulations on your debut! Looking forward to reading it.

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    1. I love that movie. I own that movie!!!

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    2. Sloane is very much like Jodie Foster's character! When I described the book to my mentor, she advised that I watch that movie for inspiration :) Thanks for commenting, Connie!

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  27. BTW, Seekerville is going to give away two more copies of this book to commenters. We're delighted that Heartwarming is open to new writers and that the content is clean fun romance. Do leave a comment for a chance to win a total of three books!

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  28. Great post, Laurie! I'm fascinated by the branding (and marketing) part of a career in writing, but also a little nervous about it. Things change so quickly. By the time I figure something out it seems like everyone else has gone on to the next big thing/idea. Your post was so helpful - it gives me something to work on now (while unpublished). Thank you, and congratulations on your book! It sounds so interesting!

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    1. Exactly! I think that establishing your brand gives you roots, so when the industry changes, you have the freedom to pivot a little while staying grounded to your brand, if that makes sense!

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  29. Welcome, Laurie, and thank you for this great, informative post! Adding to my Keeper File. :)
    I've been told my writing is "too sweet" for a certain publishing house (Not HQ) so I continue working on adding more conflict. All of that to say my target audience would be people who enjoy a sweet romance set in the south (I'm southern through and through, LOL) ;) and I always feature cats (sometimes other pets too).
    CONGRATULATIONS on your Heartwarming book!! How exciting! :)
    Blessings from Georgia, Patti Jo

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    1. I love those elements in a story, Patti Jo! Especially sweet kitties!

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  30. P.S. Waving at BONNIE (bonton)!! SO happy to "see" you today, sweet lady!! :)
    Hugs, Patti Jo

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  31. Toss my name in the hat please! It's been awhile since I read a Heartwarming.

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  32. Congratulations Laurie on your debut! This blog was perfect timing as I'm trying to figure out how to go live with Wordpress and branding is something I've been struggling with and making notes on. You've given me/us a wonderful resource here, so thank you! Personally, I love to read "edgey" romantic suspense with flawed people, and I also love diverse characters or "issue" books. That's what I'm writing and so far I haven't sold but hope to soon. I think Tara Taylor Quinn was brilliant when she came up with her brand strategy, and while not everyone will enjoy an "issue" book, there's thousands out there affected by that same "issue" who'll benefit from the hope and love generated by the story of overcoming/healing/surviving. Please toss me in the hat too, as I've yet to get a Heartwarming book and I really think I should put it on my to-read list. :)

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    1. I agree completely, Laurie! (Nice name, by the way! :) Good luck!

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  33. Laurie, thanks for being with us today and for providing such an interesting post. Branding is a difficult subject, in my opinion. I'm not sure if my social media presence reflects my brand. Hmmm?

    Larissa Reinhart comes to mind as an author who carries her brand into her FB posts. She writes humorous mysteries and her stories are delightful. Her FB comments frequently include funny info about her two daughters and their pooch. We see that quirky side of her and her family that she also provides in her stories. I always marvel at her ability to project her brand so consistently.

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    1. Oooh! I will have to check out Larissa Reinhart and study her ways :) Thanks for having me!

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    2. Great post, Laurie! You are too sweet, Debby! Thank you so much for the mention. I like to see things from the funny side of life, so it makes it easy for me. Also our family is a mess, so that's good fodder. ;) I do think its important to be aware of your brand on social media even if you're just talking about your family or your day. Some authors are a little TMI and it could turn away readers. Just my 2 cents. :)

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    3. Thanks for stopping by, Larissa. You know I'm a huge fan!

      Hugs to your wonderful family! :)

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  34. Congrats Laurie on your debut book! With no reservations sounds like an excellent read.
    Cheryl B

    CherylB1987 AT hotmail DOT com

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  35. Can't wait to read your book! Great article (from a fellow "self-professed marketing geek").

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    1. Jenny! Long time no SEE! Great to have you stop by to MEET Laurie. I hear you have snow today in Colorado!

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    2. Marketing geeks are my kind of people! :)

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  36. Laurie, thanks for visiting Seekerville and talking about branding today. I'll admit, branding is one area I struggle with. So, all tips are appreciated!

    Congratulations on your Heartwarming Debut novel!! It sounds fabulous!

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    1. Thank you so much, Rhonda! Always happy to be here!

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  37. Hi Laurie!

    Welcome to Seekerville today. :-)

    HUGE CONGRATS on your Heartwarming debut! With No Reservations sounds awesome. (Food and LOVE... What a great combination! Ahhh!)

    My tagline is Heartfelt, Homespun Fiction. Think: a modern-day version of The Waltons with a close-knit sense of family and community. Influences are Debbie Macomber and Jan Karon. My "brand" has somewhat of a down-home feel with an Ozarkian flair and a hint of nostalgia.

    You're so right, too -- I think nailing down our potential audience before plowing ahead with our stories greatly reduces stress. We may figure some of it out as we go, but visualizing our ideal reader beforehand provides clarity and even primes our creative wells.

    I've also picked up authors' books, and while they may not have a definitive tagline, I know by their "brand" (their stories, their online communication, and how they project themselves), I'm going to LOVE their stories. :-)

    Congratulations, again! Can't wait to read your debut!

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    1. Thank you, Cynthia! So good to see you here :) I love all the things that make up your brand. You're exactly right!

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  38. Hi Laurie! Tons of great info in your post! I believe I have a brand, but not about my books. It's about my dogs. I've had dozens of people say, "I know you! You're the Pom lady!" Of course, I try to use photos of me with my dogs whenever possible.

    Congrats on the new book!

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    1. My dog Sampson is one of my very best friends. That's a good thing to be known for!

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  39. Congrats on your debut! I'm not sure if I've really thought much about my audience. I kind of figure it will be someone a lot like me- obsessed with superpowers but also looking for something thought provoking. She'd be young and quirky and maybe feel a bit out of touch with most people- but able to relate to the author of the stories that touch her so much (for me, that author was Martha Finley, at least with her Millie Keith series). I'll name her Jordan after myself so I can make Jordan-kind jokes that only I understand (and, of course, other Jordans).

    My tagline? Maybe 'Finding meaning in the crazy action of life.' My brand is where action adventure, romance, comedy, quirky, and thought-provoking meet- along with a whole lot of mistaken identities, in one way or another. I think about every one of my stories has that. Maybe that's my brand...

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    1. It definitely sounds like you're on the right track. Love those elements!

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  40. Congratulations on your debut book, Laurie! What a wonderful blessing!

    Your post has influenced me to continue refining my audience...my "Sarah"...a mom who longs for adventure, excitement, and love, but because of her circumstances, settles for experiences~~vicariously~~ in books! ( I need to add more detail and really find out about "Sarah." )

    Please add my name to the drawing! Thanks...wishing you and all Seekers a tea-lightful rest of the day!

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    1. Now I'm jealous. Meg and Sarah. I need an imaginary friend. I'm going to work on this.

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    2. Yes, Kathryn! You have so much to offer Sarah!

      Tina, it's true. You must!

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  41. I've always been stumped by what brand means but you've edged me closer to an aha moment. I think part of my problem was in thinking that if you wrote contemporary romance that was brand. Or historical romance. But then I'd get confused when an author would write both. But I see now that the brand goes deeper than that. (hope that makes sense...I'm just back from the dentist and in lalaland!)

    I haven't tried the Heartwarming books yet. I adore the Love Inspired lines though and I know more than a few reviewers who give the Heartwarming books high recommendations. Must get adventurous the next time I shop at Harlequin.

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    1. Makes total sense to me! And you can trust that the Heartwarming stories will be sweet and wholesome :)

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  42. Still puzzling through this one, as it's not a concept I've fully identified in my own work. I know my what: I write Japanese historical fiction with inspirational and romantic elements. However, my why is more that I have a fascination with Japanese history and I want to provide inspy stories in that setting.

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    1. Walt, I loved seeing that you write Japanese historical fiction. I have WIP with Korean historical fiction! I realize it's not the same, but they definitely overlap with Japanese history.

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    2. I love that, Walt. So unique and interesting to give readers a scope of that history. There are definitely people who are interested in Japanese history and an even bigger audience who love historical adaptations done well! You've got this!

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  43. Hi Laurie and congratulations on your success! Your post got me thinking (a lot) about my brand. My target audience is women, probably over thirty. I lean WF with romance the central theme. High stakes, high emotion are my wheel house. My French-Canadian heritage plays into everything I write. My characters have French names, they speak French, and scenes from my stories are set in Quebec. So, maybe THAT is a start! Thank you for the prompt.

    When you mentioned authors who have an distinctive brand, Elin Hilderbrand came to mind. I haven't read a lot of her work, but she's definitely branded herself "the beach read Queen."

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    1. So happy this made you think, Josee! And I love Elin Hilderbrand!

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  44. Laurie, thank you for a great post! Congratulations on With No Reservations. Looks fabulous!

    I love the talking with imaginary people thing. Yep. I do it. Talk about them. Talk to them. :)

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    1. Thank you, Sharee. We would be weird if we didn't talk to imaginary people!

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  45. Hi Laurie, congratulations on your first novel and the description of your book sounds wonderful! As a reader, I have certain authors who never disappoint me so I tend to read them always but I am always looking for new authors who write like them. When our library patrons had favorite authors who couldn't write fast enough to feed their reading habits I often sent them to Read Alikes. There they could find read alikes of authors and genres. Guess I have been subjected to branding and just didn't know it.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win a copy of your book.
    Blessings!
    Connie
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Connie, I've never heard of Read Alikes! But I'm a sucker for "you may also like" sections on retail websites :)

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  46. Hey Laurie, congratulations on your first full length novel! Great topic and I definitely need help with my branding. I have none.

    And I talk to all sorts of imaginary people!

    I'd love to read your book so please enter me in the drawing.

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  47. Laurie, Thank you for this post. People who beta read or critique for me always say they are hungry afterward. Hmmm. Thanks so much for the info about branding.

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    1. Tanya, I had to put in a disclaimer to not read With No Reservations on an empty stomach :) Sounds like we have something in common!

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  48. Laurie, I'm sorry I'm so late. But I'm really glad I got by to read this great post! Thanks for the inspiration to take a good look at my branding. I know it's time I do an overhaul and this is some great info to start with.

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    1. Hope this inspires you! I had to cut out early because storms knocked out our power! But it's back up now :)

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    2. I'm sorry about the storms! Glad you have your power again.

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  49. Hi Laurie and thanks for this post. I have a fairly well-defined audience, but never thought about a specific audience-person. Great idea! Thanks again...

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    1. You bet! It's always my pleasure to talk marketing and branding :)

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  50. I'm a reader with PTSD so I'm interested in the PTSD aspect of the book, With No Reservations.

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