Friday, September 20, 2019

Unusual and Fun Punctuation Marks


Hello Everyone, Winnie Griggs here.

The other day I was watching a TV show (I’ve forgotten just which one now) and in a throwaway line, someone mentioned the Hedera punctuation mark. Well, I’d never heard of it before so naturally I had to look it up. (First I had to figure out how to spell it, which is a whole ‘nother story).  

Anyway, what I discovered was a whole world of unusual punctuation marks I’d never heard of before.  So in case any of the rest of you are similarly  curious, I thought I’d share what I found with you.


Acclamation Point
The acclamation point is a fun bit of punctuation that just looks happy and excited. Its purpose is to be used to indicate an exuberant welcome or an enthusiastic sense of goodwill.



Asterism
Also used in astronomy to indicate a group of stars, in punctuation it’s a nearly obsolete symbol used to indicate scene or other breaks in the text of a work. Nowadays three asterisks in a single line or another more simplified symbol performs this function.


Authority Point
As the name suggests, this punctuation mark indicates that the writer is speaking from a position of expertise or authority on the subject and that the statement or advice should be taken seriously.



Certitude Point
Similar to the Authority Point in both looks and meaning, the Certitude Point indicates the writer is absolutely certain of the facts presented but does not speak as an expert in the field.



Doubt Point
On the other end of the spectrum from the Authority Point and Certitude Point, the interesting-looking Doubt Point indicates the writer is skeptical of the statement.



Hedera
This is the one that started me on this quest. I had seen this one before, usually when perusing webdings, but I didn’t know what it was called or what it signified. The hedera is also called the fleuron and apparently dates back to old Greek and Latin texts. It was used to indicate the break between paragraphs back in the day before the custom of starting paragraphs on a new line came into common usage. These days it is used strictly as a decorative element.


Interpunct

This is a nearly obsolete bit of punctuation. In ancient times this vertically-centered dot was used to indicate a pause in the interior of sentences and sometimes to separate compound words.  It survives today in dictionaries to show the break between syllables in a word. It’s also used in mathematics to indicate the multiplication function.

Interrobang
This is another fun punctuation mark, one I could actually see myself using. The interrobang is for when you ask a question excitedly, or to express unbelief and surprise at the same time.



Irony Point
This punctuation mark actually precedes a bit of text to indicate that in the following passage there may be a crafty second layer of meaning. Surprisingly, this one has been around since 1841.



Love Point.
As the shape suggests, this one is used to signify affection or amorous subtext. This one is relatively new, appearing in 1966. 




Percontation Point
This backwards-question-mark-looking bit of punctuation is intended to be used to indicate the question is rhetorical. Who knew ʕ





Pilcrow

This one I’ve definitely seen before, and I’m sure most of you have too. And I also knew its function. But I never knew it had a name other than “paragraph mark”. Of course this is the symbol used to indicate the end of a paragraph.


Question Comma and Exclamation Comma
These fun bits of punctuation can be used when you want to express curiosity or excitement mid-sentence. They were invented in Canada in the early 1990s.








So there you have it, a bakers dozen of fun and unusual punctuation marks.

How many of these did you already know?  Which struck you as most interesting? Are there any others you’d like to throw in the mix?

Leave a comment to get in on the drawing for a copy of any book in my backlist, including an advanced copy of my upcoming re-release of Home For Thanksgiving which is now included in a Love Inspired Classic 2-in-1.




HOME FOR THANKSGIVING

All that stands between Ruby Anne Tuggle and a fresh start is an escort to Tyler, Texas, but no one in her home town is willing to accompany her and she's feeling desperate.  

Rancher Griff Lassiter is just passing through town, but he's too kind to refuse her plea. He's also too wary of being hurt again to offer anything but protection on the journey. 

Then a fever forces a change of plans along the way. Can this unexpected detour provide them with a chance to find the place they both belong...

54 comments:

  1. I've heard of the interrobang, but that's all. Unfortunately, I don't see them catching on ... and while I love the idea of the hedera, I also love modern paragraph breaks :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Iola. Unfortunately I agree that these won't come into common usage, but they are fun to explore :)
      And emojis like the various hearts and smiley with heart-eyes have taken its place in text messages at least

      Delete
  2. I have enough trouble with the regular ones. My score on Jan's quiz a couple weeks ago was even worse than my SATs.
    This is my pub day. Kindle version of "Westward Hope" is 5.99 on Amazon. I will have paperbacks to sell at in-person events. May haul a couple to ACFW, depends on what else I pack.
    I'm supposed to be on "Reading Is My Superpower" today, with Seeker Carrie, but, get this, MY computer hasn't loaded it yet. If you get on there before I manage to, tell me I said hi. Sheesh.
    I spent my last night as an unpublished author watching a Loretta Lynn documentary and doing my nails. The field is way different, it's music and it's country music, but creativity is inspiring in any form.
    The sun is barely up in NH and I'm watching a chipmunk on the woodpile.
    Your Kaybee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The relaxing life of a published author, right Kaybee?

      Delete
    2. What really happened was that I forgot Carrie starts later than Seekerville. I'm on there now if anyone wants to stop by, but I have to run out for a few. Be back later, here AND there.

      Delete
    3. Congratulations KayBee!!! Release day is always so very exciting, Doubly so for yor very first one! I hope you're taking time to celebrate big time

      Delete
    4. Congratulations on release day, Kathy! I just purchased the book on Amazon. I plan to read it soon.

      Delete
  3. I'm not even sure I could draw some of those. I'd do all right if they were on a keyboard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kathy, I was thinking that exact thing! You'd have to be able to type them. LOL

      Delete
    2. also!! HAPPY BOOK RELEASE DAY, KATHY!! Please tell everyone where they can buy it!

      Delete
    3. P,S. Carrie has featured Kathy at her blog today--Reading is My Superpower

      Delete
    4. Many of these are beyond my drawing skills as well. But you can find many of them in the webding and wingding fonts (I checked :) ).

      Delete
    5. Winnie, that doesn't help. I have never heard of webding or wingding!

      Delete
    6. LOL it's a font - check the font drop down in MS Word if you use it, there should be a listing for it there

      Delete
  4. I don't think I have heard of any of these, except the hedera, which I heard on the same TV show that you did. I think the acclamation point looks fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Susan, they do like a fun change from the everyday, don't they. I think my favorite, if you're basing it strictly on looks, is the Doubt Point

      Delete
  5. Such a fun post. And yes, when I saw that show--Last Man Standing?--I actually turned on the captioning so I could see what the word was! I've seen some of these, but didn't they were anything other than doodles :) Thanks, Winnie, for giving us the scoop!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Glynis. And THANK YOU! It WAS Last Man Standing, it's been bugging me that I couldn't remember.

      Delete
  6. I'm tempted to do away with my keyboard and write by hand just so I can incorporate some of these!

    Thanks for the fun post, Winnie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL Jan, don't abandon your keyboard just yet. As I mentioned above, you can fine many of these among the webding and wingding fonts.

      Delete
  7. These are so fun, Winnie! I've never seen most of them. But I do often use the last one--question mark exclamation point. I use it when I'm asking about something that seems crazy. haha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Missy! Now I don't feel so bad for being unfamiliar with so many of these. :)

      Delete
  8. I am gobsmacked!!!! As someone who regularly uses multiple !!! and combined !? I am particularly enamoured with the Acclamation point and the Interrobang. and don't you thinki the Acclamation point looks like a bunny? That makes me love it all the more. And interrobang is just fun to say. Plus I think the Exclamation Comma and the Question Comma should be punctuation essentials. How have I managed all these years without knowing this? And who knew punctuation could be fun and not terrorizing?! But how does one get these little pretties on her keyboard?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Kav. LOL - it DOES look like an excited bunny.
      Some of these, like the interrobang, can be found in some of the wingding fonts. Others I couldn't find anywhere.

      Delete
  9. The only ones I'd seen before were the Interpunct and the Pilcrow. But I had never heard of their names. And I'm a grammar geek and editor!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lila. Isn't it fun to learn some of these fun, but mostly useless, bits of info :)

      Delete
  10. How fun are these!?! With the rise of ebooks, perhaps we'll see more of these in the future to express ourselves in our writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Erica. Wouldn't that be cool! And now, when we see them, we'll know just what the author is trying to convey.

      Delete
  11. Sorry I'm so late popping in folks- woke up a little under the weather and went right back to bed. I'm all better now and can't wait to read all these posts!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you're feeling a little better, Winnie!

      Delete
  12. Hello Winnie and Prayers you feel better real soon I don't think I have ever seen these before Thank you for sharing Your book cover is beautiful and sounds like a great book Thank you for the chance to win I love reading!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sarah, you're quite wecome. And thanks for those kind words and for stopping by.

      Delete
  13. Oh, Pilcrow, Pilcrow, so long have I seen thy face without knowing thy sweet, sweet name.

    Such a fun, nerdy post! :0) Thank you for sharing these gems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL Smaantha, such a pretty ode. And yes, this kind of thing really brings out the nerd in me :)

      Delete
  14. This one caught my eye: Acclamation Point
    The acclamation point is a fun bit of punctuation that just looks happy and excited. Its purpose is to be used to indicate an exuberant welcome or an enthusiastic sense of goodwill.-how do I make my keyboard do those marks? I don't know what webding is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sally. Unfortunately the Acclamation point was one I couldn't find a wingding or keyboard shortcut for. I guess for now we just need to hand draw or insert a graphic for it. :(

      Delete
  15. Congratulations, Kathy. I loved your post on Reading is my Superpower. You've demonstrated with the release of your first novel today that perseverance is a vital key to success. God bless.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Can we please bring some of these back? I love them all. Thank you for sharing this fun knowledge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Amy. I agree, but to bring them back into general use I'm afraid we'd need to make some keyboard and or font adjustments.

      Delete
  17. Hi Winnie:

    How interesting! I never knew about most of these. What a creative idea for a post unlike any others I've seen on Seekerville over the past ten years.

    Do you have the ASCII numbers for any of these? With that code these marks could even be entered in Seeker comments.

    I have a few suggestions for new punctuation marks: use the musical notation for repeat for a sentence or paragraph which should be reread immediately. Also you could have a mark for 'read slowly' and one for 'read quickly'. Then there could be a down arrow for 'this next passage is deep -- pay special attention'. Of course, there are the simple funny faces: one with a smirk could be used to indicate sarcasm for those who take everything literally.:}

    BTW: which of these new marks do you suggest using on the cover of your "Home For Thanksgiving" after the graphic which shouts, "Three Novels…Great Value"? Perhaps an upside down Doubt Point would do. :)

    Please place me in the drawing as Thanksgiving books make my favorite romances.

    Vince


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vince. Glad you enjoyed the post. And your suggestions are so fun.
      Some of these do have Unicode values - you can find them here: https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/thedefinitearticle/2015/02/05/13-punctuation-marks-you-never-knew-you-needed-but-so-do/
      And of course you are in the drawing.

      Delete
  18. What a fun post! Love especially the Canadian contribution...(I may be a bit biased on that one...lol). I didn't know many of these punctuation marks and I'm guessing I'd have to use a symbol font to find them. The majority of these symbols I've never seen before. Reminds me a bit of Gregorian chants and early notated music - it's fascinating to see how symbols have evolved in language. Thanks again Winnie (Acclamation Point) ;P Lee-Ann

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lee-Ann. Love the Gregorian chant reference. And yes, I find it fascinating too - totally geeked out doing this research.

      Delete
  19. These are fascinating, Winnie.What a fun bit of knowledge to have. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This is interesting to read. I knew two of them. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you enjoyed the post Lucy and you're quite welcome.

      Delete
  21. Amzing, Winnie! Who knew? I didn't. Seems there's a whole world of punctuated marks that I have never seen. Nor have I ever used any of them. Wonder what my editor would say if I added a few of them to my next submission!? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL Debby, you totally ought to try using some of these.

      Delete
  22. Fun post, Winnie. These were mostly unfamiliar, although would you believe I read the word interrobang in something else today? How strange I have never heard that word and now I see it twice in one day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is kind of strange Sandy, especially since it's not a word you would see in everyday usage.

      Delete
  23. Winnie I thought you were making them up until you got to that backward P paragraph marker.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL Mary, I'm not creative enough to come up with this stuff :)

      Delete
  24. Hi to my name twin! I loved this post, Winnie! Now I need to figure out how to find them for my daily use on my computer! I think the acclamation point, the doubt point, the question and exclamation commas, and the authority point would come in very handy! LOL

    Thanks for the fun post--I got a kick out of it (insert acclamation point)!!
    I'd love to be entered in the drawing!

    Winnie Thomas

    ReplyDelete

If you have trouble leaving a comment, please "clear your internet cache" and try again. You can find this in your browser settings under "clear history."